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Stanford Psychologist Who Studies Racial Profiling Wins ‘Genius Grant’

KQED Science | September 17, 2014 | 0 Comments

Stanford Psychologist Who Studies Racial Profiling Wins ‘Genius Grant’

A professor whose research is helping a California police department improve its strained relationship with the black community and a lawyer who advocates for victims of domestic abuse are among the 21 winners of this year's MacArthur Foundation 'genius grants.'

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Why More Trees in the Sierra Mean Less Water for California

KQED Science | September 15, 2014 | 19 Comments

Why More Trees in the Sierra Mean Less Water for California

California water districts are eyeing a potential new source of water: trees. After a century of fire suppression, Sierra Nevada forests are more dense than ever before. And those pine trees are taking up a lot of water that might otherwise run off into California rivers.

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Coastal Cleanup 2014: Taming Beach Trash

KQED Science | September 12, 2014 | 1 Comment

Coastal Cleanup 2014: Taming Beach Trash

Plastics provide convenience but litter our oceans and waterways. Find out about efforts to clean up our coast and inland waterways at this year's annual Coastal Cleanup and how the "bag ban" may help keep trash out of our environment.

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Apple Jumps Into Health Monitoring With New Watch

KQED Science | September 9, 2014 | 1 Comment

Apple Jumps Into Health Monitoring With New Watch

The debut of the device marks Apple's entrance into multibillion-dollar mobile health industry.

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California Aquaculture Companies Explore Sustainable Fish Farming

KQED Science | September 8, 2014 | 2 Comments

California Aquaculture Companies Explore Sustainable Fish Farming

Most of the farm-produced seafood consumed in this country is imported, much of it from Asia, and that has raised concerns about environmental and public health regulation at overseas fish farms. Now some California aquaculture businesses are pitching environmentally friendly ways to bring more business here.

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NASA’s MAVEN Spacecraft Will Explore Mars’ Upper Atmosphere

KQED Science | September 5, 2014 | 1 Comment

NASA’s MAVEN Spacecraft Will Explore Mars’ Upper Atmosphere

On September 21, NASA's MAVEN (Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution) spacecraft will go boldly where no one has gone before: to the very top of the Martian atmosphere!

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<a href=http://blogs.kqed.org/lowdown/2014/09/04/burned-out-why-wildfires-in-the-west-have-gotten-so-much-worse-comic/ target=_blank >Burned Out: Why Wildfires in the West Have Gotten So Much Worse </a>

The Lowdown | September 4, 2014

Burned Out: Why Wildfires in the West Have Gotten So Much Worse

The 2014 fire season was predicted to be a doozy, and so far it hasn't failed to disappoint. Prolonged drought conditions throughout the West, felt particularly hard across the Golden State, have resulted in a string of large, destructive and extremely costly blazes, charring huge swaths of forest in Northern ...Read More

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Drought Myth-Busting: Why El Niño Is Never A Good Bet

KQED Science | September 1, 2014 | 3 Comments

Drought Myth-Busting: Why El Niño Is Never A Good Bet

The peculiar set of ocean conditions is known as a California rainmaker -- but El Niño's reputation has been greatly exaggerated.

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Oil Transport by Train Continues to Climb

KQED Science | August 28, 2014 | 0 Comments

Oil Transport by Train Continues to Climb

Sixty-six percent more oil came into California by rail in the first half of this year, compared to the first half of last year.

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A Glimpse of LUCA, Life’s Last Universal Common Ancestor

KQED Science | August 25, 2014 | 0 Comments

A Glimpse of LUCA, Life’s Last Universal Common Ancestor

A new study suggests how early life might have survived without some of the cellular machinery that is absolutely required for life today. Turns out that having a fairly leaky membrane may have been the key.

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<a href=http://www.californiareport.org/archive/R201408070850/a target=_blank >Scientists Take on Dangerous Mosquitoes in Central Valley</a>

The California Report | August 7, 2014

Scientists Take on Dangerous Mosquitoes in Central Valley

Two people have died of West Nile virus in Sacramento and Shasta counties, the first reported deaths in the state this year. Last year, 15 people died in California from the virus, which is usually transmitted to humans from a bite by an infected mosquito. One variety of mosquito found recently in San Mateo, Madera and Clovis is particularly worrisome because it can carry a number of deadly diseases, including yellow fever and West Nile. The state's entomologists are mobilizing to fight this new, bloodsucking threat.

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A Simple Mineral Has Geochemical Power That Helps Spark Life

KQED Science | August 7, 2014 | 0 Comments

A Simple Mineral Has Geochemical Power That Helps Spark Life

New work shows that the simple mineral sphalerite has geochemical powers suitable for helping life to arise from precursors in the mineral kingdom.

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Artist Will Take a 13-Hour Watery Stand to Draw Attention to Rising Seas

KQED Science | August 5, 2014 | 0 Comments

Artist Will Take a 13-Hour Watery Stand to Draw Attention to Rising Seas

A performance artist will stand in San Francisco Bay for a tidal cycle of thirteen hours to dramatize the challenge of rising seas. At high tide, she'll be covered up to her neck.

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The ‘Tahoe Tsunami’: New Study Envisions Early Geologic Event

KQED Science | July 31, 2014 | 0 Comments

The ‘Tahoe Tsunami’: New Study Envisions Early Geologic Event

A new paper marshals evidence detailing the catastrophic landslide and mega-tsunami that struck Lake Tahoe during the late Pleistocene.

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California’s Biggest Water Source Shrouded in Secrecy

KQED Science | July 31, 2014 | 18 Comments

California’s Biggest Water Source Shrouded in Secrecy

Stanford launches a major investigation of the state's dwindling groundwater resources and finds "alarming" gaps.

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Deep-Sea Octopus is Mother of the Year

KQED Science | July 30, 2014 | 0 Comments

Deep-Sea Octopus is Mother of the Year

Researchers from the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute discovered a deep-sea octopus that tends its eggs for 53 months, longer than any known animal.

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A Quest for Vegan Cheese That Actually Tastes Like Cheese

KQED Science | July 26, 2014 | 1 Comment

A Quest for Vegan Cheese That Actually Tastes Like Cheese

A team of Bay Area scientists is biohacking baker's yeast, in an effort to produce proteins that are just like milk proteins, only they're aren't from milk.

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Europe’s Rosetta Spacecraft Will Soon Ride a Comet

KQED Science | July 25, 2014 | 1 Comment

Europe’s Rosetta Spacecraft Will Soon Ride a Comet

Europe's Rosetta mission is poised to add another extraterrestrial landfall to a very short list, and top a new list as it becomes the first mission to land a probe on a comet.

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Richmond Nearly Ready to Approve Chevron Refinery Project

KQED Science | July 23, 2014 | 1 Comment

Richmond Nearly Ready to Approve Chevron Refinery Project

The Richmond City Council is considering Chevron's plans for a $1 billion project at its refinery there. If it's approved, this is one of the last steps before construction on the project would actually begin.

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2014/07/22/140287/pop_quiz_20_percent_chance_of_rain_do_you_need_an_umbrella?source=npr&category=science target=_blank >Pop Quiz: 20 Percent Chance Of Rain. Do You Need An Umbrella?</a>

KQED News | July 22, 2014

Pop Quiz: 20 Percent Chance Of Rain. Do You Need An Umbrella?

This week, All Things Considered is exploring how people interpret probability. What does it mean to us, for example, when a doctor says an operation has a 70 percent chance of success? One of the most common encounters with percent probabilities has to do with weather. Take ...Read More

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