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The First Annual World Shorebirds Day Kicks off on September 6

KQED Science | August 29, 2014 | 0 Comments

The First Annual World Shorebirds Day Kicks off on September 6

Shorebird populations worldwide are declining, and endangered birds like the spoonbill sandpiper are facing extinction in the next five years. Learn about shorebirds who migrate to San Francisco Bay during winter months and how you can join the first annual "World Shorebirds Day" celebration.

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Feds Will Allow Logging in Some Areas Burned by Rim Fire

KQED Science | August 27, 2014 | 0 Comments

Feds Will Allow Logging in Some Areas Burned by Rim Fire

A U.S. Forest Service decision will allow loggers to remove dead trees from 52 square miles of forests blackened last year in a massive central California wildfire, a move contested by environmentalists.

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After Record-Breaking Rim Fire, Log Trees or Leave Them?

KQED Science | August 26, 2014 | 2 Comments

After Record-Breaking Rim Fire, Log Trees or Leave Them?

Later this week, the U.S. Forest Service will release plans to allow logging companies to harvest some of the dead trees. Some environmental groups say it would destroy important wildlife habitat.

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What Causes Earthquakes?

KQED Science | August 24, 2014 | 1 Comment

What Causes Earthquakes?

The earth is constantly shifting and the Earth’s crust is broken up into many rocky plates, like pieces of a puzzle.

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San Francisco Wants to Know: Is Your Living Room Window Killing Migratory Birds?

KQED Science | August 22, 2014 | 0 Comments

San Francisco Wants to Know: Is Your Living Room Window Killing Migratory Birds?

Between 100 million and one billion birds die each year from colliding with glass windows of commercial or residential buildings. San Francisco is launching a program to track the damage caused by windows in homes.

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Drought-Stricken California Town Struggles to Keep the Water Flowing

KQED Science | August 20, 2014 | 2 Comments

Drought-Stricken California Town Struggles to Keep the Water Flowing

From heavy machinery to hand-held flour sifters, this town is pulling out all the stops to save its water.

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A Year After Rim Fire, Debate Sparks Over Replanting Trees

KQED Science | August 18, 2014 | 1 Comment

A Year After Rim Fire, Debate Sparks Over Replanting Trees

Reforestation is common after large fires in the West, but some scientists say it’s time to rethink how forests are replanted.

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<a href=http://blogs.kqed.org/newsfix/2014/08/15/salmon-cannon-whooshh-innovations target=_blank >Video: The Salmon Cannon–Our Next Brainstorm for Weary Fish</a>

News Fix | August 15, 2014

Video: The Salmon Cannon–Our Next Brainstorm for Weary Fish

If you're a member of the noble genus Oncorhynchus — generally speaking, the Pacific salmon — you gotta wonder what those land-dwelling Homo sapiens will come up with next. We two-legged land-dwellers have treated the native salmonids — chinook, coho, steelhead and others — to a series of fun ...Read More

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Parks Attract Affluent Homeowners to Earthquake Fault Zones Despite Risks

KQED Science | August 14, 2014 | 1 Comment

Parks Attract Affluent Homeowners to Earthquake Fault Zones Despite Risks

The Alquist-Priolo law keeps new homes away from active earthquake faults. But a study finds that the resulting 'fault zone parks' attract wealthy residents despite the seismic hazard.

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Some of Us May Have a Genetic Predisposition to Disliking Exercise

KQED Science | August 11, 2014 | 0 Comments

Some of Us May Have a Genetic Predisposition to Disliking Exercise

About 90% of us over the age of 12 fail to get as much exercise as we should. This is almost certainly not because we don’t believe in those benefits. Instead, it looks like at least part of the reason may be that some of us are genetically programmed to hate exercise.

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Cap and Trade Faces First Major Political Test

KQED Science | August 7, 2014 | 1 Comment

Cap and Trade Faces First Major Political Test

A group of Democrats wants to delay the planned expansion of California's cap-and-trade system. They're worried about the impact of higher gas prices.

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2014/08/05/the-future-of-sustainable-food-qa-with-wendell-berry/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=the-future-of-sustainable-food-qa-with-wendell-berry target=_blank >The Future of Sustainable Food: Q&A with Wendell Berry</a>

QUEST | August 5, 2014

The Future of Sustainable Food: Q&A with Wendell Berry

Photo by Guy Mendes Farmer and environmentalist Wendell Berry is known to many as the father of the sustainable food movement. He is an outspoken advocate for an agrarian revolution to end industrialized practices that he says are poisoning the land and destroying rural communities. In recent years Berry has promoted ...Read More

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<a href=http://blogs.kqed.org/newsfix/2014/08/04/cal-fire-gains-ground-on-mother-lode-blaze-2nd-fire-burns-near-yosemite/ target=_blank >California Fire Update: Cooler Weather Could Help Firefighters</a>

News Fix | August 4, 2014

California Fire Update: Cooler Weather Could Help Firefighters

The sky over Burney, a town of about 3,500 northeast of Redding, as the nearby Eiler Fire tripled in size on Saturday. (Courtesy Ryan Albaugh) Update, Monday 8:25 a.m.: We're still waiting for updated acreage numbers on the major fires burning in Shasta, Siskiyou and Modoc counties, but cooler, moister weather ...Read More

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Genetically Engineering Wild Populations Could Be Just Around the Corner

KQED Science | July 28, 2014 | 0 Comments

Genetically Engineering Wild Populations Could Be Just Around the Corner

We might be able to use selfish genes to cause the population of mosquitoes that carry malaria to crash. Is genetically manipulating these insects out in the wild worth preventing hundreds of millions of people from getting malaria?

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California’s Wandering Wolf Now Has Puppies in Oregon

KQED Science | July 25, 2014 | 0 Comments

California’s Wandering Wolf Now Has Puppies in Oregon

OR-7 has at least three pups that he and a mate are raising in the Cascade Range of southern Oregon.

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Feds Propose New Safety Rules for Oil Trains

KQED Science | July 23, 2014 | 1 Comment

Feds Propose New Safety Rules for Oil Trains

There have been several fiery oil train derailments in other parts of the country in the past year. The new rules include lower speed limits, better brakes and safer rail cars.

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<a href=http://blogs.kqed.org/newsfix/2014/07/22/real-time-lightning-tracker-lets-you-keep-track-of-strikes-worldwide/ target=_blank >Real-Time Lightning Tracker Lets You Keep Up on Strikes Everywhere</a>

News Fix | July 22, 2014

Real-Time Lightning Tracker Lets You Keep Up on Strikes Everywhere

This screen shot from Blitzortung.org shows lightning strikes in North America. Click on the image to go to the site. The Oakland A's ballpark, already afflicted by intermittent sewage problems, was cursed early this morning by lightning, which brought down power lines and caused a brief power outage. PG&E spokeswoman Tamar Sarkissian ...Read More

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New UC Berkeley Study Shows Oxytocin May Help Rejuvenate Aging Muscles

KQED Science | July 21, 2014 | 0 Comments

New UC Berkeley Study Shows Oxytocin May Help Rejuvenate Aging Muscles

UC Berkeley researchers have discovered that administering oxytocin may help maintain healthy muscles during aging.

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<a href=http://blogs.kqed.org/newsfix/2014/07/17/drought-bear-cubs-captured-and-released-in-lake-tahoe/ target=_blank >Three ‘Drought Bear’ Cubs Captured and Released at Lake Tahoe</a>

News Fix | July 17, 2014

Three ‘Drought Bear’ Cubs Captured and Released at Lake Tahoe

Brace yourselves. There is a serious problem taking shape in the Sierra Nevada (but on occasion, it's seriously cute, too.) Nevada Department of Wildlife Conservation Aid Cooper Munson holds two of three black bear cubs captured and safely released on Wednesday. (Photo courtesy of NDOWDrought bear cubs. On Wednesday, Nevada Department of ...Read More

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California’s Drought is Hurting Farmers More Than Food Consumers

KQED Science | July 15, 2014 | 0 Comments

California’s Drought is Hurting Farmers More Than Food Consumers

Economists estimate that the drought will cost the state's farm economy about $2.2 billion this year, including the loss of more than 17,000 jobs.

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