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UC Berkeley Study Says Migratory Birds Use Infrasound to Avoid Storms

KQED Science | December 19, 2014 | 0 Comments

UC Berkeley Study Says Migratory Birds Use Infrasound to Avoid Storms

It’s well-known that daylight length is an important migratory trigger, but a new study from UC Berkeley finds birds use infrasound, or tones lower than the normal range of human hearing, to flee bad weather.

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<a href=http://ww2.kqed.org/news/2014/12/17/just-add-rain-and-bay-area-hills-turn-green target=_blank >Just Add Rain, and Bay Area Hills Turn Green</a>

KQED News | December 17, 2014

Just Add Rain, and Bay Area Hills Turn Green

Here's a lovely sight and sound for you: Rain sluicing through a towering tree up in Oakland's Redwood Regional Park.

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What Gives the Morpho Butterfly Its Magnificent Blue?

KQED Science | December 16, 2014 | 1 Comment

What Gives the Morpho Butterfly Its Magnificent Blue?

What does it mean to be blue? The wings of a Morpho butterfly are some of the most brilliant structures in nature, and yet they contain no blue pigment -- they harness the physics of light at the nanoscale.

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L.A.’s “Resilience By Design” Report Lays Out Ambitious Earthquake Infrastructure Plan

KQED Science | December 11, 2014 | 0 Comments

L.A.’s “Resilience By Design” Report Lays Out Ambitious Earthquake Infrastructure Plan

The just-released seismic resiliency plan for Los Angeles goes beyond just saving lives; it hopes to ensure that the nation's second-largest city will still work after a magnitude 7.8 earthquake.

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2014/12/10/151234/debate_should_we_genetically_modify_food?source=npr&category=science target=_blank >Debate: Should We Genetically Modify Food?</a>

KQED News | December 10, 2014

Debate: Should We Genetically Modify Food?

Proponents of GMOs say that farmers who grow these crops are able to use fewer environmentally damaging pesticides. Critics, however, say the claims of those benefits are overblown.

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Earth’s Most Common Mineral is Bagged and Tagged: Meet Bridgmanite

KQED Science | December 4, 2014 | 0 Comments

Earth’s Most Common Mineral is Bagged and Tagged: Meet Bridgmanite

Thanks to a meteorite collected in 1879, we have finally given a name to the most abundant mineral in Earth. Here's why it took so long to christen this stuff.

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The Hidden Perils of Permafrost

KQED Science | December 2, 2014 | 0 Comments

The Hidden Perils of Permafrost

For thousands of years, mysterious bacteria have remained dormant in the Arctic permafrost. Now, a warming climate threatens to bring them back to life. What does that mean for the rest of us?

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/video/millie-hughes-fulford-scientist-in-space/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=millie-hughes-fulford-scientist-in-space target=_blank >Former Astronaut Studies Aging with Space Experiment</a>

QUEST | November 26, 2014

Former Astronaut Studies Aging with Space Experiment

UCSF molecular biologist and former astronaut Millie Hughes-Fulford is sending an experiment into space that could one day help travelers going to Mars and aging people here on Earth. She seeks to understand how a lack of gravity impacts our immune system.

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Stalled Clean Power Alternative to PG&E Looms Large in New S.F. Electricity Law

KQED Science | November 25, 2014 | 4 Comments

Stalled Clean Power Alternative to PG&E Looms Large in New S.F. Electricity Law

A city-run alternative to PG&E could rake in millions for San Francisco but faces opposition from the business sector.

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California Drought: A Glimmer of Hope For Winter Rain And Snow

KQED Science | November 20, 2014 | 1 Comment

California Drought: A Glimmer of Hope For Winter Rain And Snow

But given the state of long-range forecasting, climatologists admit that the glimmer could be a mirage.

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<a href=http://ww2.kqed.org/news/2014/11/19/water-board-weighs-phasing-out-diablo-canyons-cooling-system target=_blank >Water Board Weighs Phasing Out Diablo Canyon’s Cooling System</a>

KQED News | November 19, 2014

Water Board Weighs Phasing Out Diablo Canyon’s Cooling System

The power plant near San Luis Obispo pulls in 2.5 billion gallons of seawater every day, and then lets it out, 20 degrees warmer, back into the ocean. The system is known to cause marine damage, harming billions of fish larvae.

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Scientists Find Genes in Mice That May Lead to Future Ebola Treatments

KQED Science | November 17, 2014 | 0 Comments

Scientists Find Genes in Mice That May Lead to Future Ebola Treatments

Scientists have identified Ebola-resistant and Ebola-sensitive mouse strains. Not only will the sensitive mice be useful as a relatively quick way to test new Ebola treatments, but by comparing its genetics to those of the resistant strains, scientists may find new ways to treat Ebola.

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/video/catching-up-on-sleep-science/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=catching-up-on-sleep-science target=_blank >Catching Up on Sleep Science</a>

QUEST | November 12, 2014

Catching Up on Sleep Science

This video story was originally produced by Sheraz Sadiq and was updated by Lisa Landers and Arwen Curry. Be honest – do you ever brag about how little sleep you get? If so, you're not alone. Humans are the only species that seems to deliberately deprive themselves of ...Read More

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Yosemite’s Tuolumne Meadows: A Long-standing Geological Puzzle

KQED Science | November 6, 2014 | 0 Comments

Yosemite’s Tuolumne Meadows: A Long-standing Geological Puzzle

The iconic Tuolumne Meadows, in the high Sierra, is a geological puzzle. A newly published study traces the roots of the meadows to an incident deep in time and deep below the ground.

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Life Aboard a ‘Polar Roller': America’s Last Heavy Icebreaker

KQED Science | November 6, 2014 | 1 Comment

Life Aboard a ‘Polar Roller': America’s Last Heavy Icebreaker

And a trick to prevent seasickness that the skipper swears by (other than staying ashore).

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Oldest Sequenced Genome From 45,000-Year-Old DNA

KQED Science | November 3, 2014 | 1 Comment

Oldest Sequenced Genome From 45,000-Year-Old DNA

In a technological tour de force, a group of scientists have managed to read most of the DNA from the thigh bone of a 45,000 year-old-man. They were able to estimate that humans and Neanderthals bred in a major way 50,000-60,000 years ago and to confirm that the human mutation rate is a bit slower than scientists previously thought.

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A Historic First: Rosetta Spacecraft Plans to Land Its Probe on a Comet

KQED Science | October 31, 2014 | 0 Comments

A Historic First: Rosetta Spacecraft Plans to Land Its Probe on a Comet

After 10 years of travel and three months orbiting the comet 67p/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, the European Space Agency's (ESA) Rosetta spacecraft is poised to deliver its landing probe, Philae, to the comet's surface -- a first in history.

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Activists Push for Public Review of Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant

KQED Science | October 29, 2014 | 1 Comment

Activists Push for Public Review of Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant

An environmental group claims there are unanswered questions about the seismic safety of the Central Coast plant.

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New Research Shows Targeted Antioxidants Help Mice Live Longer, Healthier Lives

KQED Science | October 21, 2014 | 0 Comments

New Research Shows Targeted Antioxidants Help Mice Live Longer, Healthier Lives

While many of the benefits of antioxidants are undoubtedly oversold, we do know that if given at high enough levels and targeted to the right place, antioxidants can help a mouse live 10-20% longer. If this holds up in people, that is equivalent to an extra 7-14 years for people here in the U.S.

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New Paper Outlines Updated Look on San Andreas Fault System

KQED Science | October 16, 2014 | 0 Comments

New Paper Outlines Updated Look on San Andreas Fault System

A new study from our local earthquake experts has put new and clearer numbers on the risk of large earthquakes in the Bay Area's future--evidence of new progress in this slow process of enlightenment.

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