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<a href=http://ww2.kqed.org/futureofyou/2015/04/16/sleep-hacks-3-ways-to-prevent-electronics-from-wrecking-a-good-nights-rest/ target=_blank >Sleep Hacks: 3 Ways to Prevent Electronics From Wrecking a Good Night’s Rest</a>

KQED Science | April 16, 2015

Sleep Hacks: 3 Ways to Prevent Electronics From Wrecking a Good Night’s Rest

Do you read from a smartphone late at night, or charge it next to your bed? Here are three tricks to stop the artificial light onslaught.

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<a href=http://ww2.kqed.org/futureofyou/2015/04/15/meet-the-man-leading-californias-3m-precision-medicine-initiative/ target=_blank >Meet the Man Leading California’s $3M ‘Precision Medicine’ Initiative</a>

KQED Science | April 15, 2015

Meet the Man Leading California’s $3M ‘Precision Medicine’ Initiative

The state of California just launched a $3 million “Precision Medicine” initiative. The project’s leader, Dr. Atul Butte, opens up to KQED about some of the key challenges, including efforts to safeguard patient privacy.

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River Otter Populations Are Expanding in the Bay Area

KQED Science | April 10, 2015 | 3 Comments

River Otter Populations Are Expanding in the Bay Area

River otters in the Bay Area finally have the first-ever census of their population published this year. After decades of no sign of the species, their numbers are expanding to nearly all nine counties in the Bay Area. Find out more from naturalist Sharol Nelson-Embry.

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<a href=http://ww2.kqed.org/news/2015/04/06/radio-reporter-busted-by-water-inspector-drought target=_blank >When a Radio Reporter Gets Busted by the Water Inspector</a>

KQED News | April 6, 2015

When a Radio Reporter Gets Busted by the Water Inspector

It began when she hopped onto the side of my bathtub, plastic bag in hand, and told me to turn on the shower. Sue Tensfeldt hates to be called a water cop. And she's not really a cop at all, but she is on the lookout for water wasters. She's a ...Read More

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NASA’s MESSENGER Spacecraft: Preparing Its Farewell Message From Mercury

KQED Science | April 3, 2015 | 0 Comments

NASA’s MESSENGER Spacecraft: Preparing Its Farewell Message From Mercury

NASA's MESSENGER spacecraft is soon to end its 10-year mission in a fiery touchdown on the surface of the planet Mercury--but not before giving us our most up-close look yet at this little understood and elusive world.

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<a href=http://ww2.kqed.org/futureofyou/robotics-surgeons-google-jandj target=_blank >Robotic Surgeons on the Horizon From Google, Johnson & Johnson Team</a>

KQED Science | March 27, 2015

Robotic Surgeons on the Horizon From Google, Johnson & Johnson Team

Your surgeon's favorite new assistant? A robotic arm. It may seem like the stuff of science fiction, but nimble robot hands are routinely used by surgeons in complex surgeries today. The field has grown dramatically in recent years, with hospitals around the country performing thousands of robot-assisted surgeries every year. And now, ...Read More

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Tsunami Preparedness Week: Building a Network of Awareness

KQED Science | March 26, 2015 | 0 Comments

Tsunami Preparedness Week: Building a Network of Awareness

Tsunamis are a worldwide menace with specific local threats. It pays to learn your local situation and keep the knowledge fresh in your community.

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Hypothesis: Our Solar System Lacks ‘Super-Earths’ Because Jupiter Wrecked Them All

KQED Science | March 23, 2015 | 2 Comments

Hypothesis: Our Solar System Lacks ‘Super-Earths’ Because Jupiter Wrecked Them All

It turns out our solar system is weird: it doesn't have any rocky "super-Earths" orbiting closer to the sun than Mercury. Here's one theory as to why: like Miley Cyrus, Jupiter came in like a wrecking ball and smashed any nascent terrestrial planets just as the solar system was forming.

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2015/03/21/158642/why_some_mushrooms_glow_in_the_dark?source=npr&category=science target=_blank >Why Some Mushrooms Glow in the Dark</a>

KQED News | March 21, 2015

Why Some Mushrooms Glow in the Dark

A team of scientists recently created some fake, glowing mushrooms and scattered them in a Brazilian forest in hopes of solving an ancient mystery: Why do some fungi emit light?

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After an Earthquake, Use Your Phone Camera – For Science

KQED Science | March 19, 2015 | 1 Comment

After an Earthquake, Use Your Phone Camera – For Science

Large earthquakes are in our future. When one strikes, there are ways you can help scientists study the event using your phone.

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Calif. Water Regulators Tighten the Screws — But Just a Little

KQED Science | March 17, 2015 | 2 Comments

Calif. Water Regulators Tighten the Screws — But Just a Little

As California plods into its fourth year of drought, critics say the latest round of statewide water restrictions are too little -- and possibly too late.

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Los Angeles Willing to Pay Its Highest Price Ever for Water

KQED Science | March 16, 2015 | 2 Comments

Los Angeles Willing to Pay Its Highest Price Ever for Water

Los Angeles is offering rice farmers in the Sacramento Valley more money than the city has ever paid for water — $700 per acre-foot. At this price, rice farmers could make more money selling water than they can make on their crops. That makes it easy to say “yes,” says Lance Tennis, whose family has […]

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<a href=http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2015/03/want-to-get-more-girls-into-stem-give-them-real-world-work/ target=_blank >Want to Get More Girls Into STEM? Give Them Real-World Work</a>

Mindshift | March 13, 2015

Want to Get More Girls Into STEM? Give Them Real-World Work

A screen grab from Burlington High School's Help Desk video, “All the Techie Ladies,” produced by the female members of the team. From the left: student Kelsey O'Brien and teacher Jennifer Scheffer. In an effort to encourage girls' interest in STEM, a high school in Massachusetts is giving students a chance ...Read More

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<a href=http://ww2.kqed.org/futureofyou/broken-medical-records target=_blank >Critical Condition: How a Broken Medical Records System is Endangering America’s Health</a>

KQED Science | March 12, 2015

Critical Condition: How a Broken Medical Records System is Endangering America’s Health

Digital medical records are scattered across dozens of systems that don’t talk with each other, endangering patients.

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<a href=http://blogs.kqed.org/stateofhealth/2015/03/11/industry-reaction-to-sugar-papers-mirrors-tobacco-in-1990s/ target=_blank >Industry Reaction to ‘Sugar Papers’ Mirrors Tobacco in 1990s</a>

State of Health | March 11, 2015

Industry Reaction to ‘Sugar Papers’ Mirrors Tobacco in 1990s

(Getty Images) The sugar industry worked to steer federal health research a report released Monday revealed. As State of Health reported, newly-uncovered industry documents dating to the1960s showed that the sugar industry influenced the National Institute of Dental Research, part of the National Institutes of Health, ...Read More

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<a href=http://blogs.kqed.org/stateofhealth/2015/03/10/sugar-papers-show-industrys-influence-in-1970s-dental-program-study-says/ target=_blank >‘Sugar Papers’ Show Industry’s Influence in 1970’s Dental Program, Study Says</a>

State of Health | March 10, 2015

‘Sugar Papers’ Show Industry’s Influence in 1970’s Dental Program, Study Says

Hundreds of pages of newly-found documents show that the sugar industry worked closely with the federal government in the late 1960s and early 1970s to determine a research agenda to prevent cavities in children, an analysis of the documents shows.

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<a href=http://ww2.kqed.org/futureofyou/2015/03/09/apples-advance-into-medical-research-targets-preventative-care-3/ target=_blank >As Apple Watch Launches, Taking Stock of Competitors and Possibilities</a>

KQED Science | March 9, 2015 | 0 Comments

As Apple Watch Launches, Taking Stock of Competitors and Possibilities

The tech titan's latest device/platform drops into a busy gadget niche that has a big gender gap among early adopters. Still, analysts are expecting more than 10 million sales in the first year.

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Scientists Discover Natural Glass Created by Volcanoes and Lightning

KQED Science | March 5, 2015 | 0 Comments

Scientists Discover Natural Glass Created by Volcanoes and Lightning

Geologists are familiar with something most of us have never seen—spherules, or microscopic balls of natural glass that hide in sediments all over the world. A new study reports a previously unknown kind of spherule that’s forged during volcanic eruptions as lightning lashes roiling clouds of hot ash.

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Vivid New Seadragon Found Hiding in a Museum

KQED Science | March 3, 2015 | 0 Comments

Vivid New Seadragon Found Hiding in a Museum

Science has just introduced the first new seadragon species in 150 years, and the first new ichthyosaur species in 130 years. The coincidence illustrates the value of museum collections.

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A New, Stronger Tunnel to Bring Hetch Hetchy Water to the Bay Area

KQED Science | March 2, 2015 | 0 Comments

A New, Stronger Tunnel to Bring Hetch Hetchy Water to the Bay Area

The San Francisco Public Utilities opened on Friday a new cement-encased, steel-lined tunnel that runs from Sunol Valley to Fremont. It will carry an average of 265 million gallons of water a day for customers of the Hetch Hetchy Water System Improvement Program, which consists of more than 80 projects to seismically retrofit and upgrade an 80-year-old water system serving 2.6 million people in the Bay Area.

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