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Tag: evolution

A Glimpse of LUCA, Life’s Last Universal Common Ancestor

KQED Science | August 25, 2014 | 0 Comments

A Glimpse of LUCA, Life’s Last Universal Common Ancestor

A new study suggests how early life might have survived without some of the cellular machinery that is absolutely required for life today. Turns out that having a fairly leaky membrane may have been the key.

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Comb Jelly DNA Studies Are Changing How Scientists Think Animals Evolved

KQED Science | June 2, 2014 | 5 Comments

Comb Jelly DNA Studies Are Changing How Scientists Think Animals Evolved

Comb jellies are these beautiful, otherworldly creatures that sparkle gently in the sea. And now, if a study in the journal Science and another one in the journal Nature hold up, they may not be so gentle on evolution or the tree of life. These “aliens of the sea” are fundamentally changing how we think about both.

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New Trove of Canadian Fossils Expands Knowledge of Cambrian Explosion

KQED Science | February 13, 2014 | 0 Comments

New Trove of Canadian Fossils Expands Knowledge of Cambrian Explosion

A new trove of soft-body fossils promises to expand the range of time and life-forms available to science as we explore the Cambrian Explosion of a half-billion years ago.

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New Species Discovered by Bay Area Scientists

KQED Science | January 3, 2014 | 0 Comments

New Species Discovered by Bay Area Scientists

The work of finding and describing species new to science isn't just something Charles Darwin did. Scientists at Bay Area institutions have discovered ants in Madagascar, barnacles in the Gulf of Guinea and legless lizards here in California.

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Why Are So Many People Right-Handed? Genetic Research May Hold The Clues

KQED Science | September 23, 2013 | 7 Comments

Why Are So Many People Right-Handed? Genetic Research May Hold The Clues

Scientists have struggled for a long time to explain why 85-90 percent of people are right-handed. They’ve known genetics plays an important role in people occasionally ending up left-handed, but they also know it is not the whole story.

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Adapting to Stress: Early Exposure Gives Amphibians Higher Tolerance To Pesticides

KQED Science | July 31, 2013 | 0 Comments

Adapting to Stress: Early Exposure Gives Amphibians Higher Tolerance To Pesticides

Amphibians are going extinct faster than any other class of organisms in human history. Experiments suggest that some species might be able to tolerate certain pesticides in the short run. Whether that could give them enough of a cushion to adapt over the long run remains to be seen.

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A Mind for Animals: An Interview with Virginia Morell

KQED Science | May 15, 2013 | 0 Comments

A Mind for Animals: An Interview with Virginia Morell

In her new book Animal Wise, Virginia Morell challenges us to recognize the evolutionary roots of animal cognition and to see their rich intellectual and emotional capacities as shaped by natural selection.

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