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How Science Can Help Prevent a (Bad) Hangover

KQED Science | December 29, 2014 | 3 Comments

How Science Can Help Prevent a (Bad) Hangover

In the annals of medical research, you won’t find many studies on the common hangover. But one intrepid Bay Area scientist has taken on the topic -- and even has an inexpensive remedy you probably haven't heard about.

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Bird Biology Knowledge Expands with the Sequencing of 48 Genomes

KQED Science | December 29, 2014 | 0 Comments

Bird Biology Knowledge Expands with the Sequencing of 48 Genomes

In a stunning feat of scientific prowess, a large group of scientists has completely sequenced the genomes of 48 different bird species. But as sequencing gets easier, managing all of that data is turning out to be the real challenge.

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2014/12/28/152616/scientists_discover_that_drunk_birds_sing_like_drunks?source=npr&category=science target=_blank >Scientists Discover That Drunk Birds Sing Like Drunks</a>

KQED News | December 28, 2014

Scientists Discover That Drunk Birds Sing Like Drunks

If you've ever listened to karaoke at a bar, you know that drinking can affect how well someone can sing. Christopher Olson and his colleagues at Oregon Health and Science University recently set out to find if the same was true for birds, specifically zebra finches. "We just showed up in ...Read More

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2014/12/27/152585/an_aspiring_martian_continues_to_pursue_the_red_planet?source=npr&category=science target=_blank >An Aspiring Martian Continues to Pursue the Red Planet</a>

KQED News | December 27, 2014

An Aspiring Martian Continues to Pursue the Red Planet

Lt. Heidi Beemer has dreamed of going to Mars since she was 8 years old. She's carefully planned her life, from her education to her career, with a goal of getting to the red planet.

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2014/12/26/152512/recordings_that_made_waves_the_songs_that_saved_the_whales?source=npr&category=science target=_blank >Recordings That Made Waves: The Songs That Saved the Whales</a>

KQED News | December 26, 2014

Recordings That Made Waves: The Songs That Saved the Whales

In the mid-20th century, whale populations were dwindling. More than 50,000 whales were killed each year by commercial whalers. But then in the 1960s, a song — or rather, many songs — sparked a movement.

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/video/scary-tsunamis-2/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=scary-tsunamis-2 target=_blank >Scary Tsunamis</a>

QUEST | December 26, 2014

Scary Tsunamis

Ten years ago this week, a massive earthquake in the Indian Ocean off Sumatra triggered a tsunami that killed more than 230,000 people in Indonesia, Sri Lanka, Thailand and other countries.

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KQED Science’s Top Five Stories of 2014

KQED Science | December 26, 2014 | 0 Comments

KQED Science’s Top Five Stories of 2014

From the launch of our original web video series Deep Look to our stories over the science of schizophrenia and the politics of water — it's been another year of diverse storytelling from the KQED Science team. Here's a round-up of our top 5 stories (based on page views) that you enjoyed in 2014.

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New Data from Rosetta Spacecraft Sheds Light on Origins of Earth’s Oceans

KQED Science | December 24, 2014 | 1 Comment

New Data from Rosetta Spacecraft Sheds Light on Origins of Earth’s Oceans

After several months of analysis of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, the European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft has yielded some intriguing, and maybe, unexpected results. The data is refueling a long-running debate in the scientific community about a matter closer to home: the origin of Earth's oceans.

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Ten Years After Indian Ocean Tsunami, California is Better Prepared

KQED Science | December 23, 2014 | 0 Comments

Ten Years After Indian Ocean Tsunami, California is Better Prepared

The tragedy sparked a decade of improvements to our tsunami warning system.

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2014/12/23/152359/a_vanished_jetliner_still_haunts_families_of_the_missing?source=npr&category=science target=_blank >A Vanished Jetliner Still Haunts Families Of The Missing</a>

KQED News | December 23, 2014

A Vanished Jetliner Still Haunts Families Of The Missing

In the first months after her partner disappeared, says Sarah Bajc, she still felt his presence. "For a long time I felt him with me — I mean really physically felt him with me," she says. "I feel that less frequently now." Bajc's partner, Philip Wood, was one of 239 people ...Read More

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2014/12/23/152354/could_glitter_help_solve_nasas_giant_telescope_problem?source=npr&category=science target=_blank >Could Glitter Help Solve NASA's Giant Telescope Problem?</a>

KQED News | December 23, 2014

Could Glitter Help Solve NASA's Giant Telescope Problem?

NASA is building a new space telescope with astounding capabilities. The James Webb Space Telescope, scheduled for launch in 2018, will replace the aging Hubble space telescope and will provide unprecedented views of the first galaxies to form in the early universe. It might even offer the first clear ...Read More

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<a href=http://ww2.kqed.org/news/2014/12/22/federal-appeals-ruling-upholds-protections-for-central-valley-salmon target=_blank >Federal Appeals Ruling Upholds Protections for Central Valley Salmon</a>

KQED News | December 22, 2014

Federal Appeals Ruling Upholds Protections for Central Valley Salmon

A federal appeals court in San Francisco has upheld measures imposed by federal agencies to protect salmon and steelhead that migrate through the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta.

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Stanford Identifies Drug That May Improve Cardiac Stents

KQED Science | December 22, 2014 | 0 Comments

Stanford Identifies Drug That May Improve Cardiac Stents

Stanford researchers believe they’ve found a drug for cardiac stents that can more effectively prevent complications, because the drug targets the actual cause of stent disease.

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A Thirsty Town Debates Need for New Source of Water

KQED Science | December 22, 2014 | 3 Comments

A Thirsty Town Debates Need for New Source of Water

The central coast town of Cambria faced running out of water this year. This week, the town launches its new emergency water source, but some in the community believe a fight to shut it down is only just beginning.

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2014/12/20/152152/a_snail_so_hardcore_its_named_after_a_punk_rocker?source=npr&category=science target=_blank >A Snail So Hardcore It's Named After a Punk Rocker</a>

KQED News | December 20, 2014

A Snail So Hardcore It's Named After a Punk Rocker

Shannon Johnson, a researcher at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, found that when she talked to youngsters about sea snails, she communicated a little more effectively if she skipped the technical description and called them "punk-rock snails."

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Next Napa Quake Could Be Bigger, Stronger

KQED Science | December 19, 2014 | 0 Comments

Next Napa Quake Could Be Bigger, Stronger

New research indicates the fault that triggered the August quake is 20 miles longer than scientists realized, which could produce more powerful earthquakes in the future.

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UC Berkeley Study Says Migratory Birds Use Infrasound to Avoid Storms

KQED Science | December 19, 2014 | 0 Comments

UC Berkeley Study Says Migratory Birds Use Infrasound to Avoid Storms

It’s well-known that daylight length is an important migratory trigger, but a new study from UC Berkeley finds birds use infrasound, or tones lower than the normal range of human hearing, to flee bad weather.

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2014/12/19/152063/playlist_science?source=npr&category=science target=_blank >Playlist: Science!</a>

KQED News | December 19, 2014

Playlist: Science!

Break out the chemistry set and safety goggles. From monkeys to microbes, TED speakers in this playlist illuminate different realms of the scientific world.

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2014/12/19/152055/are_we_wired_to_be_compassionate?source=npr&category=science target=_blank >Are We Wired To Be Compassionate?</a>

KQED News | December 19, 2014

Are We Wired To Be Compassionate?

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode Just A Little Nicer. About Robert Wright's TED Talk Author Robert Wright says humans are not only wired to be compassionate but we have evolved to feel compassion out of self-interest.

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2014/12/19/152025/7_miles_beneath_the_seas_surface_who_goes_there?source=npr&category=science target=_blank >7 Miles Beneath the Sea's Surface: Who Goes There?</a>

KQED News | December 19, 2014

7 Miles Beneath the Sea's Surface: Who Goes There?

A ship full of marine scientists is floating over the deepest part of the world: the Pacific Ocean's Mariana Trench. They're sending down probes to study life in one of the most hostile environments on the planet.

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