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<a href=http://ww2.kqed.org/news/2015/03/03/hermosa-beach-voters-face-tough-choice-allow-drilling-or-pay-oil-company-17-5-million target=_blank >Hermosa Beach Voters Face Tough Choice: Allow Drilling or Pay Oil Company $17.5 Million</a>

KQED News | March 10, 2015

Hermosa Beach Voters Face Tough Choice: Allow Drilling or Pay Oil Company $17.5 Million

Hermosa Beach voters are being asked to greenlight new oil drilling or pay a penalty to settle a decades-long legal fight. It's a cautionary tale about the high stakes for land use in California cities, particularly when oil companies get involved. A “yes” vote on the only measure on Tuesday's ballot ...Read More

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<a href=http://blogs.kqed.org/stateofhealth/2015/03/10/sugar-papers-show-industrys-influence-in-1970s-dental-program-study-says/ target=_blank >‘Sugar Papers’ Show Industry’s Influence in 1970’s Dental Program, Study Says</a>

State of Health | March 10, 2015

‘Sugar Papers’ Show Industry’s Influence in 1970’s Dental Program, Study Says

Hundreds of pages of newly-found documents show that the sugar industry worked closely with the federal government in the late 1960s and early 1970s to determine a research agenda to prevent cavities in children, an analysis of the documents shows.

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<a href=http://ww2.kqed.org/futureofyou/2015/03/09/apples-advance-into-medical-research-targets-preventative-care-3/ target=_blank >As Apple Watch Launches, Taking Stock of Competitors and Possibilities</a>

KQED Science | March 9, 2015 | 0 Comments

As Apple Watch Launches, Taking Stock of Competitors and Possibilities

The tech titan's latest device/platform drops into a busy gadget niche that has a big gender gap among early adopters. Still, analysts are expecting more than 10 million sales in the first year.

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Powerful Genetic Test Prevents Paternity Mix-Up

KQED Science | March 9, 2015 | 4 Comments

Powerful Genetic Test Prevents Paternity Mix-Up

A couple who used a fertility clinic to conceive was ready to sue when the child’s blood type didn’t match up with mom and dad’s. Obviously the clinic had used the wrong sperm or made some other awful mistake. Except in this case they probably hadn’t. The couple, whose case I worked on, gave me […]

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Ancient Sinkhole Could Presage Mega-Tsunami for Hawaii

KQED Science | March 9, 2015 | 0 Comments

Ancient Sinkhole Could Presage Mega-Tsunami for Hawaii

There's buried treasure here for tsunami hunters, but scarce funding may mean Hawaii remains vulnerable.

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2015/03/07/157668/these_tunes_are_music_to_your_cats_furry_ears?source=npr&category=science target=_blank >These Tunes Are Music to Your Cats' Furry Ears</a>

KQED News | March 7, 2015

These Tunes Are Music to Your Cats' Furry Ears

When you leave the house, do you ever turn on some music to keep your cat company? What kind do you choose? Tom Jones crooning "What's New Pussycat?" A ballad by Cat Stevens? Perhaps Al Stewart's "The Year of the Cat"? Nonsense. Cats don't to want to hear humans singing about them, ...Read More

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Dawn Arrives at Ceres, Makes History

KQED Science | March 6, 2015 | 0 Comments

Dawn Arrives at Ceres, Makes History

March 6, eight years after launch and two and a half years since leaving its last port of call, the asteroid Vesta, NASA's Dawn spacecraft has arrived at the dwarf planet Ceres, making history!

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2015/03/06/157574/could_a_quokka_beat_a_numbat_oddsmakers_say_yes?source=npr&category=science target=_blank >Could A Quokka Beat a Numbat? Oddsmakers Say Yes</a>

KQED News | March 6, 2015

Could A Quokka Beat a Numbat? Oddsmakers Say Yes

It's March, and that means college basketball fans are gearing up for the NCAA tournament. But there's another tournament taking place this month — and animals aren't the mascots, they're the competitors. "Mammal March Madness" is organized by a team of evolutionary biologists. They choose 65 animal competitors and then ...Read More

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Scientists Discover Natural Glass Created by Volcanoes and Lightning

KQED Science | March 5, 2015 | 0 Comments

Scientists Discover Natural Glass Created by Volcanoes and Lightning

Geologists are familiar with something most of us have never seen—spherules, or microscopic balls of natural glass that hide in sediments all over the world. A new study reports a previously unknown kind of spherule that’s forged during volcanic eruptions as lightning lashes roiling clouds of hot ash.

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/video/bringing-fish-up-from-the-deep/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=bringing-fish-up-from-the-deep target=_blank >Bringing Fish up From the Deep</a>

QUEST | March 5, 2015

Bringing Fish up From the Deep

Scientists at the California Academy of Sciences have designed a portable decompression chamber to safely bring new fish species up from the ocean's "twilight zone."

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2015/03/05/157499/jaw_fossil_in_ethiopia_likely_oldest_ever_found_in_human_line?source=npr&category=science target=_blank >Jaw Fossil in Ethiopia Likely Oldest Ever Found in Human Line</a>

KQED News | March 5, 2015

Jaw Fossil in Ethiopia Likely Oldest Ever Found in Human Line

Scientists working in Ethiopia say they've found the earliest known fossil on the ancestral line that led to humans. It's part of a lower jaw with several teeth, and it's about 2.8 million years old. Anthropologists say the fossil fills an important gap in the record of human evolution. Although it's ...Read More

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/epArchive/R201503041000?pid=RD19 target=_blank >New Film Explores History, Ecology of the Russian River</a>

Forum | March 4, 2015

New Film Explores History, Ecology of the Russian River

A new documentary examines the state of the Russian River in the context of other troubled watersheds around the world.

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Study: Napa Quake Should Spur Retrofits to Older Buildings

KQED Science | March 3, 2015 | 0 Comments

Study: Napa Quake Should Spur Retrofits to Older Buildings

The Bay Area's worst shaker in 25 years revealed -- once again -- where the vulnerabilities are.

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Vivid New Seadragon Found Hiding in a Museum

KQED Science | March 3, 2015 | 0 Comments

Vivid New Seadragon Found Hiding in a Museum

Science has just introduced the first new seadragon species in 150 years, and the first new ichthyosaur species in 130 years. The coincidence illustrates the value of museum collections.

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March Drought Update: A North-South Divide, and Where’s the Snow?

KQED Science | March 3, 2015 | 0 Comments

March Drought Update: A North-South Divide, and Where’s the Snow?

Uneven rainfall across the state has helped replenish Northern California reservoirs, while those to the south remain in mostly abysmal shape. Meantime, the latest snow report is in, and it's not good.

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From Drifter to Dynamo: The Story of Plankton

KQED Science | March 3, 2015 | 0 Comments

From Drifter to Dynamo: The Story of Plankton

Most plankton are tiny drifters, wandering in a vast ocean. But where wind and currents converge they become part of a grander story… an explosion of vitality that affects all life on Earth, including our own.

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<a href=http://blogs.kqed.org/education/2015/03/03/why-do-scientists-and-the-public-disagree/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=why-do-scientists-and-the-public-disagree target=_blank >Why Do Scientists and the Public Disagree?</a>

KQED Science | March 3, 2015

Why Do Scientists and the Public Disagree?

From KQED Education Do Now: According to a new study by the Pew Research Center, scientists and the public have differing views on science-related issues. Why do you think scientists and the public disagree?

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<a href=http://blogs.kqed.org/education/2015/02/26/how-can-the-international-community-address-indoor-air-pollution/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=how-can-we-address-indoor-air-pollution target=_blank >How Can We Address Indoor Air Pollution?</a>

KQED Science | March 2, 2015

How Can We Address Indoor Air Pollution?

From KQED Education Do Now: Indoor air pollution from from burning solid fuels for heating and cooking is a huge health concern in many parts of the world. How can we best address this problem?

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2015/03/02/157323/sciencebased_artist_gives_celebrity_tortoise_a_second_life?source=npr&category=science target=_blank >Science-Based Artist Gives Celebrity Tortoise a Second Life</a>

KQED News | March 2, 2015

Science-Based Artist Gives Celebrity Tortoise a Second Life

George Dante fell in love with taxidermy as a small child. His parents took him to the American Museum of Natural History in New York City, and he couldn't tear his eyes away from the dioramas in the Hall of African Mammals. When Dante was seven he preserved his first specimen: ...Read More

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A New, Stronger Tunnel to Bring Hetch Hetchy Water to the Bay Area

KQED Science | March 2, 2015 | 0 Comments

A New, Stronger Tunnel to Bring Hetch Hetchy Water to the Bay Area

The San Francisco Public Utilities opened on Friday a new cement-encased, steel-lined tunnel that runs from Sunol Valley to Fremont. It will carry an average of 265 million gallons of water a day for customers of the Hetch Hetchy Water System Improvement Program, which consists of more than 80 projects to seismically retrofit and upgrade an 80-year-old water system serving 2.6 million people in the Bay Area.

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