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Drought-Stressed Crops May Be Better For You

KQED Science | October 20, 2014 | 1 Comment

Drought-Stressed Crops May Be Better For You

Scientists in California's Central Valley are testing the nutrient content of fruits grown with less-than-normal amounts of water. And the findings so far are raising a question: will consumers buy fruits that are just as nutritional, or sometimes higher in antioxidants, if they aren't as pretty?

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High Temps Intensified California Drought

KQED Science | October 14, 2014 | 0 Comments

High Temps Intensified California Drought

Heat and drought often go hand-in-hand, creating a vicious cycle that looks a lot like California these days.

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<a href=http://ww2.kqed.org/news/2014/10/02/court-upholds-water-releases-for-salmon-on-north-state-rivers target=_blank >Court Upholds Water Releases for Salmon on North State Rivers</a>

KQED News | October 11, 2014

Court Upholds Water Releases for Salmon on North State Rivers

A federal judge in Fresno has ruled that the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation did not violate the law when it made special reservoir releases last year to help salmon in Northern California's Klamath River survive the drought rather than save the water for farms. But U.S. District Judge Lawrence J. O'Neill ...Read More

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With Drought, New Scrutiny Over Fracking’s Water Use

KQED Science | October 10, 2014 | 6 Comments

With Drought, New Scrutiny Over Fracking’s Water Use

The drought is putting a spotlight on water use around California, including for hydraulic fracturing. How much water does fracking use and will it increase as companies tap into the Monterey Shale, estimated to be the largest oil resource in country?

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Anti-Fracking Activists in California Take Fight to County Ballots

KQED Science | October 10, 2014 | 16 Comments

Anti-Fracking Activists in California Take Fight to County Ballots

Activists are hoping local residents will do what state legislators haven’t done -- shut down the controversial oil production technique known as hydraulic fracturing.

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<a href=http://ww2.kqed.org/news/2014/10/06/california-water-officials-arent-following-own-call-for-conservation/ target=_blank >California Officials Aren’t Following Own Call for Water Conservation</a>

KQED News | October 6, 2014

California Officials Aren’t Following Own Call for Water Conservation

RIVERSIDE – Mike Soubirous is a prodigious water user, pumping more than 1 million gallons per year at his lushly landscaped home on a hot, windy Southern California hilltop. Soubirous also is a member of the Riverside City Council, and one of his jobs in that position is to make decisions ...Read More

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<a href=http://ww2.kqed.org/news/2014/09/18/california-groundwater-court-case-could-speed-up-regulation/ target=_blank >California Groundwater: Court Case Could Speed Up Regulation</a>

KQED News | October 2, 2014

California Groundwater: Court Case Could Speed Up Regulation

By Daniel Potter The Scott River's flow depends on snow melting off the nearby mountains, but the last few winters haven't delivered. In places, the river disappears underground. (Daniel Potter/KQED) California's Supreme Court is being pressed to take up a case that could dramatically alter oversight for groundwater, building on a landmark ...Read More

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California’s ‘Water Year’ Ends as Third Driest on Record

KQED Science | September 30, 2014 | 1 Comment

California’s ‘Water Year’ Ends as Third Driest on Record

Only 1924 and 1977 were drier. And there's little in the long-range forecasts to suggest a rebound soon.

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The Connection Between California’s Drought and Climate Change

KQED Science | September 29, 2014 | 1 Comment

The Connection Between California’s Drought and Climate Change

Climate change is making the weather pattern that's responsible for California's drought more likely, according to a new study from Stanford.

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Long-Range Forecast: Less Snow for Skiers, Less Water for California

KQED Science | September 24, 2014 | 0 Comments

Long-Range Forecast: Less Snow for Skiers, Less Water for California

A new federal report affirms what scientists have been saying for years: California's "bank account" of snow-melt water may be overdrawn within decades.

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Drought Rallies Support for California Water Projects

KQED Science | September 23, 2014 | 1 Comment

Drought Rallies Support for California Water Projects

Water worries persist -- and may be driving support for a multi-billion-dollar water bond.

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/epArchive/R201409191000?pid=RD19 target=_blank >California Proposition 1: Water Bond</a>

Forum | September 19, 2014

California Proposition 1: Water Bond

Water is always a hot political topic in California, and this drought-plagued year is no exception. Proposition 1 on the November ballot would authorize $7.5 billion for what supporters say are critical water quality and infrastructure projects. We'll discuss what's in the bond and hear from opponents who claim that ...Read More

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<a href=http://blogs.kqed.org/newsfix/2014/09/18/california-groundwater-court-case-could-speed-up-regulation/ target=_blank >California Groundwater: Court Case Could Speed Up Regulation</a>

KQED News | September 18, 2014

California Groundwater: Court Case Could Speed Up Regulation

By Daniel Potter The Scott River's flow depends on snow melting off the nearby mountains, but the last few winters haven't delivered. In places, the river disappears underground. (Daniel Potter/KQED) California's Supreme Court is being pressed to take up a case that could dramatically alter oversight for groundwater, building on a landmark ...Read More

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What to Know About California’s New Groundwater Law

KQED Science | September 17, 2014 | 25 Comments

What to Know About California’s New Groundwater Law

Governor Jerry Brown signed legislation Tuesday that will require the first-ever rules for pumping groundwater in California. Here's why lawmakers and the governor acted, and what the new laws mean.

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Why More Trees in the Sierra Mean Less Water for California

KQED Science | September 15, 2014 | 26 Comments

Why More Trees in the Sierra Mean Less Water for California

California water districts are eyeing a potential new source of water: trees. After a century of fire suppression, Sierra Nevada forests are more dense than ever before. And those pine trees are taking up a lot of water that might otherwise run off into California rivers.

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Quake-Revived Streams Could Keep Flowing for a While

KQED Science | September 9, 2014 | 2 Comments

Quake-Revived Streams Could Keep Flowing for a While

The Napa quake jump-started several streams in the Napa and adjoining valleys, but how long they'll run and where the water is coming from is hard to pin down.

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How to Drive Home the Drought Message: Make It a Game

KQED Science | September 8, 2014 | 1 Comment

How to Drive Home the Drought Message: Make It a Game

As the drought continues, efforts to spur action include an online game that puts users in charge of California's water supply.

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Drought Myth-Busting: Why El Niño Is Never A Good Bet

KQED Science | September 1, 2014 | 3 Comments

Drought Myth-Busting: Why El Niño Is Never A Good Bet

The peculiar set of ocean conditions is known as a California rainmaker -- but El Niño's reputation has been greatly exaggerated.

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Landmark Groundwater Reform Headed to Governor’s Desk

KQED Science | August 29, 2014 | 2 Comments

Landmark Groundwater Reform Headed to Governor’s Desk

The era of unlimited groundwater pumping in California could be ending. A package of bills would require local agencies to restore over-pumped aquifers.

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Leaky Pipes Lose Billions of Gallons of Water Every Year in the Bay Area

KQED Science | August 28, 2014 | 1 Comment

Leaky Pipes Lose Billions of Gallons of Water Every Year in the Bay Area

On top of the drought, the South Napa Quake damaged dozens of water pipes and last month a ruptured pipe ruptured on the UCLA campus leaked about 20 million gallons of water. So how strong is California's water infrastructure?

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