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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/video/the-science-of-riding-a-bicycle/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=the-science-of-riding-a-bicycle target=_blank >The Science of Riding a Bicycle</a>

QUEST | May 15, 2012

The Science of Riding a Bicycle

We don’t often think of it this way, but the everyday work of scientists frequently comes down to sewing, welding or hammering together simple materials like elastic, metal tubes and plastic to create the devices that will allow them to conduct their experiments. Mechanical engineer Jason Moore knows this all too ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2012/03/20/the-calligraphers-golden-touch/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=the-calligraphers-golden-touch target=_blank >The Calligrapher's Golden Touch</a>

QUEST | March 20, 2012

The Calligrapher's Golden Touch

Illuminated Initial N, Spanish, 1290-1310, on view at the Getty I had a fantastic middle school history teacher named Mr. Saunders. One day, after we had been learning about illuminated manuscripts, Mr. Saunders gave us a class period of complete silence–except for a tape of ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2011/11/09/%E2%80%98superfast%E2%80%99-muscles-help-bats-find-their-dinner/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=%25e2%2580%2598superfast%25e2%2580%2599-muscles-help-bats-find-their-dinner target=_blank >‘Superfast’ Muscles Help Bats Find Their Dinner</a>

QUEST | November 9, 2011

‘Superfast’ Muscles Help Bats Find Their Dinner

As a hunting bat closes in on a flying insect, its echolocation calls get closer and closer together, and shorter and shorter in duration. The calls, more than 160 per second, give the bat rapid-fire information on the location of its ever-moving prey. To the human ear, the calls register ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/slideshow/the-gritty-side-of-major-league-baseball/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=the-gritty-side-of-major-league-baseball target=_blank >The Gritty Side of Major League Baseball</a>

QUEST | October 24, 2011

The Gritty Side of Major League Baseball

Pitchers and serious baseball fan knows that brand-new balls are never used in professional play. The shiny coating applied in the factory makes it too hard for pitchers to get a good grip, so equipment managers in clubhouses around the country rub that sheen off every ball before games. ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/video/web-extra-orca-sounds-vs-underwater-noise/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=web-extra-orca-sounds-vs-underwater-noise target=_blank >Web Extra: Orca Sounds vs. Underwater Noise</a>

QUEST | September 12, 2011

Web Extra: Orca Sounds vs. Underwater Noise

FRIDAY HARBOR, SAN JUAN ISLAND – How do we distinguish orca sounds from other underwater noise?

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2011/01/13/goodbye-to-the-bevatron/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=goodbye-to-the-bevatron target=_blank >Goodbye to the Bevatron</a>

QUEST | January 14, 2011

Goodbye to the Bevatron

With the demolition of the Bevatron, a chapter of the Bay Area's high-level physics research comes to a close. By 1954, ten years after the first atomic bombs leveled Hisroshima and Nagasaki, many of the scientists who had helped develop America’s nuclear arsenal had returned to the US. After ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2010/09/24/scientists-manipulate-atoms-in-real-time/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=scientists-manipulate-atoms-in-real-time target=_blank >Scientists Manipulate Atoms in Real Time</a>

QUEST | September 24, 2010

Scientists Manipulate Atoms in Real Time

Illustration of a magnetically active iron atom under observation in the scanning tunneling microscope. (Credit: IBM Almaden-Research Center) Reported for KQEDnews.org. Imagine a future where iPods could store hundreds of thousands — or even millions — of songs, where smart phones could hold hundreds of Hollywood films, and where solar-powered ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2010/09/15/kate-nichols-post/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=kate-nichols-post target=_blank >Producer's Notes: Color By Nano – The Art of Kate Nichols</a>

QUEST | September 15, 2010

Producer's Notes: Color By Nano – The Art of Kate Nichols

These glass capillaries contain liquid solutions of silver nanoprisms synthesized by artist Kate Nichols. Image courtesy of Kate Nichols. Originally inspired by the work of Northern Renaissance painters, one could also describe artist Kate Nichols as a “Renaissance” artist herself. Nichols applies a wide variety of skills ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2010/09/14/40-years-of-the-clean-air-act/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=40-years-of-the-clean-air-act target=_blank >40 Years of the Clean Air Act</a>

QUEST | September 14, 2010

40 Years of the Clean Air Act

Bay Area smog, 1968 Reported for KQEDnews.org For those too young to remember the Bay Area 40 years ago, it’s hard to imagine the mostly clear skies that Bay Area residents enjoy today filled with choking smog from factories, cars and garbage fires. “Air pollution back in the ‘50s and ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/audio/all-charged-up-over-emfs/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=all-charged-up-over-emfs target=_blank >All Charged Up Over EMFs</a>

QUEST | August 23, 2010

All Charged Up Over EMFs

The wireless age has introduced countless devices that many of us can't live without, like cell phones, laptop computers and wifi routers. Like all electronics they communicate using electromagnetic frequencies – or EMFs. Some people worry that EMFs are making them sick – and say that technology should slow down, ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2010/08/20/reporters-notes-all-charged-up-over-emfs/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=reporters-notes-all-charged-up-over-emfs target=_blank >Reporter's Notes: All Charged Up Over EMFs</a>

QUEST | August 20, 2010

Reporter's Notes: All Charged Up Over EMFs

The wireless age has introduced countless devices that many of us can’t live without, like cell phones, laptop computers and wifi routers. Like all electronics they communicate using electromagnetic frequencies – or EMFs. Some people worry that EMFs are making them sick – and say that technology should slow ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2010/08/17/new-laser-could-create-atomic-%E2%80%9Cmovies%E2%80%9D/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=new-laser-could-create-atomic-%25e2%2580%259cmovies%25e2%2580%259d target=_blank >New Laser Could Create Atomic "Movies"</a>

QUEST | August 17, 2010

New Laser Could Create Atomic "Movies"

The new X-ray laser at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory could one day produce atomic "movies." Reported for KQEDnews.org Watching how plants transform sunlight into sugars, potentially leading to new fuels. Understanding how magnetic fields switch back and forth, a key step in developing faster computers. Scientists have big hopes for the ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/video/homegrown-particle-accelerators/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=homegrown-particle-accelerators target=_blank >Homegrown Particle Accelerators</a>

QUEST | July 28, 2010

Homegrown Particle Accelerators

QUEST journeys back to find out how physicists on the UC Berkeley campus in the 1930s, and at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in the 1970s, created "atom smashers" that led to key discoveries about the tiny constituents of the atom and paved the way for the Large Hadron Collider ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2010/07/27/producers-notes-homegrown-particle-accelerators/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=producers-notes-homegrown-particle-accelerators target=_blank >Producer's Notes: Homegrown Particle Accelerators</a>

QUEST | July 27, 2010

Producer's Notes: Homegrown Particle Accelerators

Ernest Lawrence above the 184-inch cyclotron. This was the biggest cyclotron he built at his laboratory in Berkeley, which later was named the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The 184-inch cyclotron no longer exists. But the building houses the Advanced Light Source, which uses the X-rays produced ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/video/quest-lab-bridge-thermometer/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=quest-lab-bridge-thermometer target=_blank >QUEST Lab: Bridge Thermometer</a>

QUEST | May 5, 2010

QUEST Lab: Bridge Thermometer

The roadway across the Golden Gate Bridge rises and falls as much as 16 feet depending on the temperature. When the sun hits the bridge, the metal expands and the bridge cables stretch. As the fog rolls in, the cables contract and the bridge goes up. Curators from the Outdoor ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/video/quest-lab-speed-of-sound/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=quest-lab-speed-of-sound target=_blank >QUEST Lab: Speed of Sound</a>

QUEST | April 7, 2010

QUEST Lab: Speed of Sound

Along with cable cars and seagulls, the Golden Gate Bridge foghorn is one of San Francisco's most iconic sounds. But did you know that if you hear that foghorn off in the distance, you can calculate how many miles you are from the bridge? Using the Speed of ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/video/the-new-bay-bridge-earthquake-makeover/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=the-new-bay-bridge-earthquake-makeover target=_blank >The New Bay Bridge: Earthquake Makeover</a>

QUEST | April 7, 2010

The New Bay Bridge: Earthquake Makeover

It's been more than two decades since part of the upper deck of the Bay Bridge collapsed in the Loma Prieta earthquake. The new self-anchored suspension bridge being built to replace the vulnerable eastern span of the Bay Bridge is scheduled to open in 2013 and will be seismically and ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2010/04/02/behind-the-scenes-with-the-mythbusters/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=behind-the-scenes-with-the-mythbusters target=_blank >Behind the Scenes with the Mythbusters</a>

QUEST | April 2, 2010

Behind the Scenes with the Mythbusters

A touching Mythbusters family portrait: Jamie Hyneman (L), Adam Savage (R), and (what's left of) the original Buster. (Editor's note: We have a guest blogger this week, KQED's Michael Kadel who accompanied us on a visit to our explosive San Francisco neighbors, the Mythbusters.) Once one strays from Public Broadcasting into ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2010/03/26/sun-earth-day-magnetic-magic/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=sun-earth-day-magnetic-magic target=_blank >Sun-Earth Day: Magnetic Magic</a>

QUEST | March 26, 2010

Sun-Earth Day: Magnetic Magic

Iron filings reveal the pattern of a magnet's invisible force field.Saturday, March 20th, was not only Vernal Equinox, but the annual Sun-Earth Day: a NASA-promoted effort around the country to focus attention on the special connections between the Sun and the Earth. This year's theme: Magnetic ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/audio/the-godfather-of-green/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=the-godfather-of-green target=_blank >The Godfather of Green</a>

QUEST | February 15, 2010

The Godfather of Green

Art Rosenfeld is retiring, stepping down from his post with the California Energy Commission. The 83-year-old nuclear physicist pushed California to enact some of the toughest energy efficiency standards in the world. QUEST talks with Rosenfeld about his passion for saving kilowatts. Andrea Kissack reports. ...

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