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Sizing Up Tsunamis By Their Sound Waves

KQED Science | June 5, 2013 | 0 Comments

Sizing Up Tsunamis By Their Sound Waves

Scientists at Stanford may have found a way to build a better warning system for tsunamis. The key is listening for the earthquake's sonic signature.

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Can’t Pop This: Bubble Scientists Reveal the Physics of Soap

KQED Science | May 9, 2013 | 1 Comment

Can’t Pop This: Bubble Scientists Reveal the Physics of Soap

Why do bubbles pop? And what happens when they do? UC Berkeley scientists have cracked the bubble cluster code.

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<a href=http://blogs.kqed.org/newsfix/2013/05/08/96462/ target=_blank >How Can Anyone Hit a 90 MPH Fastball? Science Explains!</a>

KQED News | May 8, 2013

How Can Anyone Hit a 90 MPH Fastball? Science Explains!

Hitting a home run seems impossible. A fastball takes .4 seconds to go from the pitcher's hand to home plate, and a hitter needs a full .25 seconds to see the ball and react. So how does anyone do it? Researchers at UC Berkeley have identified an area of the brain that makes it possible.

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2013/05/03/the-state-of-the-universe-matter-and-age-up-dark-energy-down/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=the-state-of-the-universe-matter-and-age-up-dark-energy-down target=_blank >The State of the Universe: Matter and Age Up, Dark Energy Down</a>

QUEST | May 3, 2013

The State of the Universe: Matter and Age Up, Dark Energy Down

Smile, universe, for your baby picture! Maps of the early universe by the COBE, WMAP, and Planck missions. Image credit: NASA On news that the universe may be 100 million years older than previously estimated, cosmological markets have seen a reduction in the benchmark of ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2013/01/09/exploratorium%E2%80%99s-science-with-spirit-transcends-place/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=exploratorium%25e2%2580%2599s-science-with-spirit-transcends-place target=_blank >Exploratorium’s Science with Spirit Transcends Place</a>

QUEST | January 9, 2013

Exploratorium’s Science with Spirit Transcends Place

Blowing Smoke, an exhibit at the Exploratorium designed by artist Ned Kahn for the Turbulent Landscapes Exhibition. (Photo: D'Arcy Norman/Calgary, Canada) Legend has it that opening day for the late physicist Frank Oppenheimer’s “San Francisco Project” happened by accident. As told by the Chronicle’s ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/video/whats-next-for-nuclear/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=whats-next-for-nuclear target=_blank >What's Next for Nuclear?</a>

QUEST | September 18, 2012

What's Next for Nuclear?

Despite the accident last year at a nuclear plant in Fukushima, Japan, here in the United States, some policymakers – including President Obama – are pushing to expand nuclear energy as a source of abundant carbon-free electricity. “To meet our growing energy needs and prevent the worst consequences of climate change, ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2012/06/26/i-flamed-amazement-the-physics-of-st-elmos-fire/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=i-flamed-amazement-the-physics-of-st-elmos-fire target=_blank >"I Flamed Amazement": The Physics of St. Elmo's Fire</a>

QUEST | June 26, 2012

"I Flamed Amazement": The Physics of St. Elmo's Fire

St. Elmo's Fire on a cockpit window, by Fly For Fun[/add_caption_link]. Clad in a bright yellow raincoat and a crown of butterflies, laughing and singing, Ariel delighted the audience from the first moments of California Shakespeare Theater's "The Tempest."

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/video/the-science-of-riding-a-bicycle/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=the-science-of-riding-a-bicycle target=_blank >The Science of Riding a Bicycle</a>

QUEST | May 15, 2012

The Science of Riding a Bicycle

We don’t often think of it this way, but the everyday work of scientists frequently comes down to sewing, welding or hammering together simple materials like elastic, metal tubes and plastic to create the devices that will allow them to conduct their experiments. Mechanical engineer Jason Moore knows this all too ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2012/03/20/the-calligraphers-golden-touch/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=the-calligraphers-golden-touch target=_blank >The Calligrapher's Golden Touch</a>

QUEST | March 20, 2012

The Calligrapher's Golden Touch

Illuminated Initial N, Spanish, 1290-1310, on view at the Getty I had a fantastic middle school history teacher named Mr. Saunders. One day, after we had been learning about illuminated manuscripts, Mr. Saunders gave us a class period of complete silence–except for a tape of ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2011/11/09/%E2%80%98superfast%E2%80%99-muscles-help-bats-find-their-dinner/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=%25e2%2580%2598superfast%25e2%2580%2599-muscles-help-bats-find-their-dinner target=_blank >‘Superfast’ Muscles Help Bats Find Their Dinner</a>

QUEST | November 9, 2011

‘Superfast’ Muscles Help Bats Find Their Dinner

As a hunting bat closes in on a flying insect, its echolocation calls get closer and closer together, and shorter and shorter in duration. The calls, more than 160 per second, give the bat rapid-fire information on the location of its ever-moving prey. To the human ear, the calls register ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/slideshow/the-gritty-side-of-major-league-baseball/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=the-gritty-side-of-major-league-baseball target=_blank >The Gritty Side of Major League Baseball</a>

QUEST | October 24, 2011

The Gritty Side of Major League Baseball

Pitchers and serious baseball fan knows that brand-new balls are never used in professional play. The shiny coating applied in the factory makes it too hard for pitchers to get a good grip, so equipment managers in clubhouses around the country rub that sheen off every ball before games. ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/video/web-extra-orca-sounds-vs-underwater-noise/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=web-extra-orca-sounds-vs-underwater-noise target=_blank >Web Extra: Orca Sounds vs. Underwater Noise</a>

QUEST | September 12, 2011

Web Extra: Orca Sounds vs. Underwater Noise

FRIDAY HARBOR, SAN JUAN ISLAND – How do we distinguish orca sounds from other underwater noise?

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2011/01/13/goodbye-to-the-bevatron/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=goodbye-to-the-bevatron target=_blank >Goodbye to the Bevatron</a>

QUEST | January 14, 2011

Goodbye to the Bevatron

With the demolition of the Bevatron, a chapter of the Bay Area's high-level physics research comes to a close. By 1954, ten years after the first atomic bombs leveled Hisroshima and Nagasaki, many of the scientists who had helped develop America’s nuclear arsenal had returned to the US. After ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2010/09/24/scientists-manipulate-atoms-in-real-time/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=scientists-manipulate-atoms-in-real-time target=_blank >Scientists Manipulate Atoms in Real Time</a>

QUEST | September 24, 2010

Scientists Manipulate Atoms in Real Time

Illustration of a magnetically active iron atom under observation in the scanning tunneling microscope. (Credit: IBM Almaden-Research Center) Reported for KQEDnews.org. Imagine a future where iPods could store hundreds of thousands — or even millions — of songs, where smart phones could hold hundreds of Hollywood films, and where solar-powered ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2010/09/15/kate-nichols-post/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=kate-nichols-post target=_blank >Producer's Notes: Color By Nano – The Art of Kate Nichols</a>

QUEST | September 15, 2010

Producer's Notes: Color By Nano – The Art of Kate Nichols

These glass capillaries contain liquid solutions of silver nanoprisms synthesized by artist Kate Nichols. Image courtesy of Kate Nichols. Originally inspired by the work of Northern Renaissance painters, one could also describe artist Kate Nichols as a “Renaissance” artist herself. Nichols applies a wide variety of skills ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2010/09/14/40-years-of-the-clean-air-act/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=40-years-of-the-clean-air-act target=_blank >40 Years of the Clean Air Act</a>

QUEST | September 14, 2010

40 Years of the Clean Air Act

Bay Area smog, 1968 Reported for KQEDnews.org For those too young to remember the Bay Area 40 years ago, it’s hard to imagine the mostly clear skies that Bay Area residents enjoy today filled with choking smog from factories, cars and garbage fires. “Air pollution back in the ‘50s and ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/audio/all-charged-up-over-emfs/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=all-charged-up-over-emfs target=_blank >All Charged Up Over EMFs</a>

QUEST | August 23, 2010

All Charged Up Over EMFs

The wireless age has introduced countless devices that many of us can't live without, like cell phones, laptop computers and wifi routers. Like all electronics they communicate using electromagnetic frequencies – or EMFs. Some people worry that EMFs are making them sick – and say that technology should slow down, ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2010/08/20/reporters-notes-all-charged-up-over-emfs/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=reporters-notes-all-charged-up-over-emfs target=_blank >Reporter's Notes: All Charged Up Over EMFs</a>

QUEST | August 20, 2010

Reporter's Notes: All Charged Up Over EMFs

The wireless age has introduced countless devices that many of us can’t live without, like cell phones, laptop computers and wifi routers. Like all electronics they communicate using electromagnetic frequencies – or EMFs. Some people worry that EMFs are making them sick – and say that technology should slow ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2010/08/17/new-laser-could-create-atomic-%E2%80%9Cmovies%E2%80%9D/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=new-laser-could-create-atomic-%25e2%2580%259cmovies%25e2%2580%259d target=_blank >New Laser Could Create Atomic "Movies"</a>

QUEST | August 17, 2010

New Laser Could Create Atomic "Movies"

The new X-ray laser at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory could one day produce atomic "movies." Reported for KQEDnews.org Watching how plants transform sunlight into sugars, potentially leading to new fuels. Understanding how magnetic fields switch back and forth, a key step in developing faster computers. Scientists have big hopes for the ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/video/homegrown-particle-accelerators/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=homegrown-particle-accelerators target=_blank >Homegrown Particle Accelerators</a>

QUEST | July 28, 2010

Homegrown Particle Accelerators

QUEST journeys back to find out how physicists on the UC Berkeley campus in the 1930s, and at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in the 1970s, created "atom smashers" that led to key discoveries about the tiny constituents of the atom and paved the way for the Large Hadron Collider ...

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