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This Week’s Cosmic Inflation Discovery: Five Big Questions Answered

KQED Science | March 21, 2014 | 1 Comment

This Week’s Cosmic Inflation Discovery: Five Big Questions Answered

Chances are you read a headline about the Big Bang earlier this week. Perhaps you clicked to an article about it and started reading up. But you may still have some burning what-is-this-Big-Bang-news-anyway questions.

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Stanford Scientists Celebrate Evidence of Universe’s Early Growth

KQED Science | March 17, 2014 | 0 Comments

Stanford Scientists Celebrate Evidence of Universe’s Early Growth

In one of the first tiny fractions of an instant after the Big Bang, the Universe expanded explosively, faster than the speed of light. That exponential expansion of, well, everything, is described by the theory of inflation, which may now be confirmed.

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One Step Closer to Nuclear Fusion Reactions

KQED Science | February 12, 2014 | 2 Comments

One Step Closer to Nuclear Fusion Reactions

Physicists at Lawrence Livermore National Lab's National Ignition Facility said they've taken a significant step toward achieving nuclear fusion ignition.

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Mavericks Surf Competition Is Friday; How and Where to Watch

KQED Science | January 23, 2014 | 0 Comments

Mavericks Surf Competition Is Friday; How and Where to Watch

Tens of thousands of people are expected to descend on Half Moon Bay to watch the big wave surf contest, but the beach and cliffs are off-limits to spectators. If you want to watch the competition, your options are on TV, online or at a festival near the beach.

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Stunning Fish Skeletons Serve Science and Art

KQED Science | January 7, 2014 | 0 Comments

Stunning Fish Skeletons Serve Science and Art

Cleared and stained skeletons are strikingly beautiful. But not many people outside the lab would ever know it—until now. "Cleared" is an exhibit of stained fish skeletons currently on display at the Seattle Aquarium, prepared and photographed by Adam P. Summers. Recently, Summers and his colleagues used a cleared and stained manta ray to discover how these curiously flat fish filter food out of the water.

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Our Ten Favorite Science Sounds of 2013

KQED Science | December 27, 2013 | 0 Comments

Our Ten Favorite Science Sounds of 2013

From whales and elephant seals to brain music and killer electrons, our best sounds of the year.

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Our Top Science Stories from 2013

KQED Science | December 19, 2013 | 0 Comments

Our Top Science Stories from 2013

From the debut of the world's largest solar plant to Comet ISON, zombified bees to the physics of sailing — it's been another year of diverse storytelling from the KQED Science team. Here's a round-up of our top 10 stories (based on page views) that you've enjoyed in 2013.

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Why Does a Curveball Curve?

KQED Science | October 25, 2013 | 0 Comments

Why Does a Curveball Curve?

With the World Series in full swing, most Americans would probably say they know the basic rules of baseball: the pitcher throws it, the batter hits it, three strikes and you’re out. But underneath it all, the rules that truly govern this game are the laws of physics. “When you go to a ballgame you’re […]

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What Makes ‘Sneaker Waves’ so Sneaky — and Dangerous

KQED Science | October 22, 2013 | 0 Comments

What Makes ‘Sneaker Waves’ so Sneaky — and Dangerous

These insidious waves often seem to come out of nowhere and claim lives -- even on calm, sunny days. But how?

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How Do These Boats Sail Faster Than the Wind?

KQED Science | September 11, 2013 | 4 Comments

How Do These Boats Sail Faster Than the Wind?

It isn’t magic; it’s just physics. And it’s an idea as simple as rocket science, which in this case really breaks down to what you learned from riding a bike.

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Stanford X-Rays Bring a 200-Year-Old Opera Back to Life

KQED Science | June 11, 2013 | 0 Comments

Stanford X-Rays Bring a 200-Year-Old Opera Back to Life

According to legend, Cherubini's 18th-century opera Medea dragged on a bit. Maybe that's why Cherubini, or someone, used charcoal to scratch out a page and a half of the score.

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Sizing Up Tsunamis By Their Sound Waves

KQED Science | June 5, 2013 | 0 Comments

Sizing Up Tsunamis By Their Sound Waves

Scientists at Stanford may have found a way to build a better warning system for tsunamis. The key is listening for the earthquake's sonic signature.

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Can’t Pop This: Bubble Scientists Reveal the Physics of Soap

KQED Science | May 9, 2013 | 1 Comment

Can’t Pop This: Bubble Scientists Reveal the Physics of Soap

Why do bubbles pop? And what happens when they do? UC Berkeley scientists have cracked the bubble cluster code.

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<a href=http://blogs.kqed.org/newsfix/2013/05/08/96462/ target=_blank >How Can Anyone Hit a 90 MPH Fastball? Science Explains!</a>

News Fix | May 8, 2013

How Can Anyone Hit a 90 MPH Fastball? Science Explains!

Hitting a home run seems impossible. A fastball takes .4 seconds to go from the pitcher's hand to home plate, and a hitter needs a full .25 seconds to see the ball and react. So how does anyone do it? Researchers at UC Berkeley have identified an area of the brain that makes it possible.

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2013/05/03/the-state-of-the-universe-matter-and-age-up-dark-energy-down/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=the-state-of-the-universe-matter-and-age-up-dark-energy-down target=_blank >The State of the Universe: Matter and Age Up, Dark Energy Down</a>

QUEST | May 3, 2013

The State of the Universe: Matter and Age Up, Dark Energy Down

Smile, universe, for your baby picture! Maps of the early universe by the COBE, WMAP, and Planck missions. Image credit: NASA On news that the universe may be 100 million years older than previously estimated, cosmological markets have seen a reduction in the benchmark of ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2013/01/09/exploratorium%E2%80%99s-science-with-spirit-transcends-place/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=exploratorium%25e2%2580%2599s-science-with-spirit-transcends-place target=_blank >Exploratorium’s Science with Spirit Transcends Place</a>

QUEST | January 9, 2013

Exploratorium’s Science with Spirit Transcends Place

Blowing Smoke, an exhibit at the Exploratorium designed by artist Ned Kahn for the Turbulent Landscapes Exhibition. (Photo: D'Arcy Norman/Calgary, Canada) Legend has it that opening day for the late physicist Frank Oppenheimer’s “San Francisco Project” happened by accident. As told by the Chronicle’s ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/video/whats-next-for-nuclear/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=whats-next-for-nuclear target=_blank >What's Next for Nuclear?</a>

QUEST | September 18, 2012

What's Next for Nuclear?

Despite the accident last year at a nuclear plant in Fukushima, Japan, here in the United States, some policymakers – including President Obama – are pushing to expand nuclear energy as a source of abundant carbon-free electricity. “To meet our growing energy needs and prevent the worst consequences of climate change, ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2012/06/26/i-flamed-amazement-the-physics-of-st-elmos-fire/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=i-flamed-amazement-the-physics-of-st-elmos-fire target=_blank >"I Flamed Amazement": The Physics of St. Elmo's Fire</a>

QUEST | June 26, 2012

"I Flamed Amazement": The Physics of St. Elmo's Fire

St. Elmo's Fire on a cockpit window, by Fly For Fun[/add_caption_link]. Clad in a bright yellow raincoat and a crown of butterflies, laughing and singing, Ariel delighted the audience from the first moments of California Shakespeare Theater's "The Tempest."

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/video/the-science-of-riding-a-bicycle/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=the-science-of-riding-a-bicycle target=_blank >The Science of Riding a Bicycle</a>

QUEST | May 15, 2012

The Science of Riding a Bicycle

We don’t often think of it this way, but the everyday work of scientists frequently comes down to sewing, welding or hammering together simple materials like elastic, metal tubes and plastic to create the devices that will allow them to conduct their experiments. Mechanical engineer Jason Moore knows this all too ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2012/03/20/the-calligraphers-golden-touch/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=the-calligraphers-golden-touch target=_blank >The Calligrapher's Golden Touch</a>

QUEST | March 20, 2012

The Calligrapher's Golden Touch

Illuminated Initial N, Spanish, 1290-1310, on view at the Getty I had a fantastic middle school history teacher named Mr. Saunders. One day, after we had been learning about illuminated manuscripts, Mr. Saunders gave us a class period of complete silence–except for a tape of ...

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