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Confusion Over Drought Rules on Lawns for New Homes

KQED Science | April 7, 2015 | 0 Comments

Confusion Over Drought Rules on Lawns for New Homes

Builders and developers are pondering the governor's new water mandates -- and scratching their heads.

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Warm Winter Wrought Havoc for Coastal Wildlife

KQED Science | April 5, 2015 | 5 Comments

Warm Winter Wrought Havoc for Coastal Wildlife

Warm air and warm ocean waters together proved bad news this winter for wildlife on the Farallon Islands and along the nothern California coast.

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Lunar Eclipse Visible in Bay Area Saturday Morning

KQED Science | April 3, 2015 | 1 Comment

Lunar Eclipse Visible in Bay Area Saturday Morning

A total lunar eclipse, also known as a "blood moon," will be visible from the Bay Area early Saturday morning.

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Governor Orders Water Cuts Amid Record Low Snowpack

KQED Science | March 31, 2015 | 18 Comments

Governor Orders Water Cuts Amid Record Low Snowpack

Governor Jerry Brown orders the state Water Resources Control Board to implement mandatory reductions to cut water use by 25 percent.

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What Happens When You Put a Hummingbird in a Wind Tunnel?

KQED Science | March 31, 2015 | 3 Comments

What Happens When You Put a Hummingbird in a Wind Tunnel?

Scientists use a high-speed camera to film hummingbirds' aerial acrobatics at 1000 frames per second. They see, frame by frame, how neither wind nor rain stop these tiniest of birds from fueling up.

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Why Isn’t Desalination the Answer to All California’s Water Problems?

KQED Science | March 30, 2015 | 176 Comments

Why Isn’t Desalination the Answer to All California’s Water Problems?

After four years of nowhere near enough rain, Californians are wondering where else to look for water, and many are talking about the ocean -- desalination. The problem is, it’s really expensive to turn salt water into drinking water. And it’s hard to do it in a way that’s friendly to sea life. But a group of mayors around Monterey Bay say they don't have any other options.

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Hypothesis: Our Solar System Lacks ‘Super-Earths’ Because Jupiter Wrecked Them All

KQED Science | March 23, 2015 | 2 Comments

Hypothesis: Our Solar System Lacks ‘Super-Earths’ Because Jupiter Wrecked Them All

It turns out our solar system is weird: it doesn't have any rocky "super-Earths" orbiting closer to the sun than Mercury. Here's one theory as to why: like Miley Cyrus, Jupiter came in like a wrecking ball and smashed any nascent terrestrial planets just as the solar system was forming.

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A Candid Conversation With California’s ‘Water Czar’

KQED Science | March 23, 2015 | 21 Comments

A Candid Conversation With California’s ‘Water Czar’

The State Water Resources Control Board is California's top arbiter of water supply conflicts. Lately it's been caught in a tug of war between those who would have it tread lightly with local water agencies and those calling for aggressive statewide rationing.

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Calif. Water Regulators Tighten the Screws — But Just a Little

KQED Science | March 17, 2015 | 2 Comments

Calif. Water Regulators Tighten the Screws — But Just a Little

As California plods into its fourth year of drought, critics say the latest round of statewide water restrictions are too little -- and possibly too late.

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Newt Sex: Buff Males! Writhing Females! Cannibalism!

KQED Science | March 17, 2015 | 6 Comments

Newt Sex: Buff Males! Writhing Females! Cannibalism!

Every winter, California newts leave the safety of their forest burrows and travel as far as three miles to mate in the pond where they were born. Their mating ritual is a raucous affair that involves bulked-up males, writhing females and a little cannibalism.

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Los Angeles Willing to Pay Its Highest Price Ever for Water

KQED Science | March 16, 2015 | 2 Comments

Los Angeles Willing to Pay Its Highest Price Ever for Water

Los Angeles is offering rice farmers in the Sacramento Valley more money than the city has ever paid for water — $700 per acre-foot. At this price, rice farmers could make more money selling water than they can make on their crops. That makes it easy to say “yes,” says Lance Tennis, whose family has […]

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Ancient Sinkhole Could Presage Mega-Tsunami for Hawaii

KQED Science | March 9, 2015 | 0 Comments

Ancient Sinkhole Could Presage Mega-Tsunami for Hawaii

There's buried treasure here for tsunami hunters, but scarce funding may mean Hawaii remains vulnerable.

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Dawn Arrives at Ceres, Makes History

KQED Science | March 6, 2015 | 0 Comments

Dawn Arrives at Ceres, Makes History

March 6, eight years after launch and two and a half years since leaving its last port of call, the asteroid Vesta, NASA's Dawn spacecraft has arrived at the dwarf planet Ceres, making history!

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Study: Napa Quake Should Spur Retrofits to Older Buildings

KQED Science | March 3, 2015 | 0 Comments

Study: Napa Quake Should Spur Retrofits to Older Buildings

The Bay Area's worst shaker in 25 years revealed -- once again -- where the vulnerabilities are.

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From Drifter to Dynamo: The Story of Plankton

KQED Science | March 3, 2015 | 0 Comments

From Drifter to Dynamo: The Story of Plankton

Most plankton are tiny drifters, wandering in a vast ocean. But where wind and currents converge they become part of a grander story… an explosion of vitality that affects all life on Earth, including our own.

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A New, Stronger Tunnel to Bring Hetch Hetchy Water to the Bay Area

KQED Science | March 2, 2015 | 0 Comments

A New, Stronger Tunnel to Bring Hetch Hetchy Water to the Bay Area

The San Francisco Public Utilities opened on Friday a new cement-encased, steel-lined tunnel that runs from Sunol Valley to Fremont. It will carry an average of 265 million gallons of water a day for customers of the Hetch Hetchy Water System Improvement Program, which consists of more than 80 projects to seismically retrofit and upgrade an 80-year-old water system serving 2.6 million people in the Bay Area.

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Can Technology Make a Dent in East Bay Traffic?

KQED Science | March 2, 2015 | 4 Comments

Can Technology Make a Dent in East Bay Traffic?

Engineers are betting they can ease a notoriously congested stretch of freeway in the East Bay. But only time will tell how "smart" the I-80 SMART Corridor can be.

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Scientists Tackle a Dual Threat: More Acid, Less Oxygen in the Ocean

KQED Science | February 26, 2015 | 0 Comments

Scientists Tackle a Dual Threat: More Acid, Less Oxygen in the Ocean

Marine scientists from up and down the West Coast say it's a one-two punch to the Pacific food web.

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Railroads, Big Oil Move to Ease Fears Over Crude Shipments

KQED Science | February 24, 2015 | 2 Comments

Railroads, Big Oil Move to Ease Fears Over Crude Shipments

Railroads and oil companies stage a show-and-tell in Sacramento to highlight safety measures they've put in place. Environmentalists and community activists remain skeptical.

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Obama Vetoes Keystone XL Pipeline Bill

KQED Science | February 24, 2015 | 1 Comment

Obama Vetoes Keystone XL Pipeline Bill

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said the Senate will vote no later than March 3 to override the veto. But Republicans do not appear to have enough votes to override the veto.

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