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Stanford Identifies Drug That May Improve Cardiac Stents

KQED Science | December 22, 2014 | 0 Comments

Stanford Identifies Drug That May Improve Cardiac Stents

Stanford researchers believe they’ve found a drug for cardiac stents that can more effectively prevent complications, because the drug targets the actual cause of stent disease.

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Getting Genetic-Based Health Data Just Got Easier in Canada and the U.K.

KQED Science | December 15, 2014 | 0 Comments

Getting Genetic-Based Health Data Just Got Easier in Canada and the U.K.

Here in the U.S., if you want to get health information from your direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic test, you need to use an online resource like Promethease. The same is no longer true in Canada and the U.K.

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Scientists Find Genes in Mice That May Lead to Future Ebola Treatments

KQED Science | November 17, 2014 | 0 Comments

Scientists Find Genes in Mice That May Lead to Future Ebola Treatments

Scientists have identified Ebola-resistant and Ebola-sensitive mouse strains. Not only will the sensitive mice be useful as a relatively quick way to test new Ebola treatments, but by comparing its genetics to those of the resistant strains, scientists may find new ways to treat Ebola.

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<a href=http://blogs.kqed.org/stateofhealth/2014/11/10/ucsf-initiative-links-sugar-science-to-your-health/ target=_blank >UCSF Initiative Links ‘Sugar Science’ to Your Health</a>

State of Health | November 10, 2014

UCSF Initiative Links ‘Sugar Science’ to Your Health

A new initiative from UC San Francisco is spelling out the health dangers of sugar in clear terms. The “sugar science” project distilled mountains of research on the health impacts of added sugar and found links to three chronic illnesses. ...Read More

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<a href=http://blogs.kqed.org/stateofhealth/2014/10/29/state-issues-tailored-quarantine-guidelines-for-travelers-from-ebola-affected-countries/ target=_blank >State Issues ‘Tailored’ Quarantine Guidelines for Travelers from Ebola-Affected Countries</a>

State of Health | October 29, 2014

State Issues ‘Tailored’ Quarantine Guidelines for Travelers from Ebola-Affected Countries

Gov. Jerry Brown met last week with state officials, including state health officer Dr. Ron Chapman, center left. (Brad Alexander/Office of the Governor) Joining other states across the country, California's health officer has now added guidelines for a “risk-based quarantine order” for people traveling to California from one of the three ...Read More

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Berkeley Lab Tackles Global Vaccine Delivery Problem with Portable Solar-Powered Fridge

KQED Science | October 27, 2014 | 0 Comments

Berkeley Lab Tackles Global Vaccine Delivery Problem with Portable Solar-Powered Fridge

Scientists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have developed a portable vaccine solar-power fridge designed to run without power for five days, so vaccines are still viable when they are delivered in remote countries.

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‘Bionic Eye’ Allows Some Blind People to See Light

KQED Science | October 27, 2014 | 1 Comment

‘Bionic Eye’ Allows Some Blind People to See Light

A California woman recently became the first person in the West to receive a new type of bionic eye, an implant that will help her see for the first time in nearly three decades.

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<a href=http://blogs.kqed.org/stateofhealth/2014/09/26/vaccine-opt-out-rate-at-sons-school-is-32-percent-should-i-freak-out/ target=_blank >Vaccine Opt-Out Rate at Son’s School is 32% — ‘Should I Freak Out?’</a>

State of Health | October 26, 2014

Vaccine Opt-Out Rate at Son’s School is 32% — ‘Should I Freak Out?’

(Jeff J. Mitchell: Getty Images) Statewide, there has been a dramatic increase in parents choosing not to vaccinate their children. The rate of parents opting out by filing what's called a “personal belief exemption,” or PBE, doubled over seven years. Parents check a school's test scores in advance. Why not vaccine rates? Earlier ...Read More

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<a href=http://blogs.kqed.org/stateofhealth/2014/10/24/genetic-variant-linked-to-lower-breast-cancer-rates-in-latinas/ target=_blank >Genetic Variant Linked to Lower Breast Cancer Rates in Latinas</a>

State of Health | October 24, 2014

Genetic Variant Linked to Lower Breast Cancer Rates in Latinas

(Getty Images) Researchers have long known that Latina women have lower rates of breast cancer compared to African-American and white women. They have mainly pointed to lifestyle and environmental factors to explain why –- Latinas tend to have more children, breast feed longer, and drink less alcohol, all factors that are ...Read More

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<a href=http://blogs.kqed.org/stateofhealth/2014/10/22/ebola-is-not-that-contagious-and-10-other-quick-facts/ target=_blank >Ebola Is Not That Contagious, and 10 Other Quick Facts</a>

State of Health | October 22, 2014

Ebola Is Not That Contagious, and 10 Other Quick Facts

Two nurses at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas contracted Ebola from a patient they were treating, but 44 of 48 others who came in contact with the patient, including his fiancee, have completed their quarantine period and are cleared of the disease. The remaining four should complete their quarantine ...Read More

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New Research Shows Targeted Antioxidants Help Mice Live Longer, Healthier Lives

KQED Science | October 21, 2014 | 0 Comments

New Research Shows Targeted Antioxidants Help Mice Live Longer, Healthier Lives

While many of the benefits of antioxidants are undoubtedly oversold, we do know that if given at high enough levels and targeted to the right place, antioxidants can help a mouse live 10-20% longer. If this holds up in people, that is equivalent to an extra 7-14 years for people here in the U.S.

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Drought-Stressed Crops May Be Better For You

KQED Science | October 20, 2014 | 1 Comment

Drought-Stressed Crops May Be Better For You

Scientists in California's Central Valley are testing the nutrient content of fruits grown with less-than-normal amounts of water. And the findings so far are raising a question: will consumers buy fruits that are just as nutritional, or sometimes higher in antioxidants, if they aren't as pretty?

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<a href=http://blogs.kqed.org/stateofhealth/2014/10/16/poll-more-than-half-of-americans-worry-about-ebola-outbreak-in-u-s/ target=_blank >Poll: More Than Half of Americans Worry About Ebola Outbreak in U.S.</a>

State of Health | October 16, 2014

Poll: More Than Half of Americans Worry About Ebola Outbreak in U.S.

A Harvard School of Public Health poll finds that more than a third of Americans (38 percent) are worried that Ebola will infect them or a family member over the next year.

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/video/in-rare-sea-snail-scientists-find-compound-that-could-help-cancer-patients/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=in-rare-sea-snail-scientists-find-compound-that-could-help-cancer-patients target=_blank >In Rare Sea Snail, Scientists Find Compound That Could Help Cancer Patients</a>

QUEST | October 16, 2014

In Rare Sea Snail, Scientists Find Compound That Could Help Cancer Patients

PORT HUENEME — Frank Oakes is betting his future on a snail. Thousands are suctioned onto the walls of 19 outdoor aquaculture tanks behind his office in Port Hueneme, California, south of Santa Barbara. Shaped like oblong cinnamon rolls, the black, tan, and striped snails may live up to 60 ...Read More

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<a href=http://blogs.kqed.org/stateofhealth/2014/10/10/32-myths-and-plenty-of-facts-about-the-flu-vaccine/ target=_blank >32 Myths — and Plenty of Facts — About the Flu Vaccine</a>

State of Health | October 10, 2014

32 Myths — and Plenty of Facts — About the Flu Vaccine

KQED News social media editor Olivia Allen-Price gets her flu shot. (Lisa Pickoff-White/KQED) By Tara Haelle, NPR Brace yourselves: Flu season is coming. And along with the coughing, fevers and aches you can expect a lot of unreliable or downright wrong information about the flu vaccine. Flu kills more ...Read More

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Do Wearables and Health Apps Belong in the Doctor’s Office?

KQED Science | October 6, 2014 | 2 Comments

Do Wearables and Health Apps Belong in the Doctor’s Office?

Wearables and health apps made a multi-billion-dollar industry out of healthy peoples' desires to count calories and rack up steps. Now can this technology make the transition to a medical setting, to help people with chronic illnesses?

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<a href=http://blogs.kqed.org/stateofhealth/2014/10/02/why-advocates-say-browns-veto-of-livestock-antibiotics-bill-is-a-good-thing/ target=_blank >Why Advocates Say Brown’s Veto of Livestock-Antibiotics Bill is a Good Thing</a>

State of Health | October 2, 2014

Why Advocates Say Brown’s Veto of Livestock-Antibiotics Bill is a Good Thing

(iStock/Getty Images) By Joe Rubin Senate Bill 835 was crafted as a measure aimed at limiting antibiotic use in livestock. To those concerned about the growing problem of antibiotic resistance, it might seem surprising that Gov. Jerry Brown vetoed the bill earlier this week. Yet advocates believe that in ...Read More

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<a href=http://www.californiareport.org/archive/R201408210850/b target=_blank >California-Trained Doctor Helps Keep Liberian Hospital Open During Ebola Crisis</a>

The California Report | October 1, 2014

California-Trained Doctor Helps Keep Liberian Hospital Open During Ebola Crisis

While many run from the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, some brave souls are running toward the region to help. Dr. James Appel is one of those. Trained in the Inland Empire at the Loma Linda University School of Medicine, he's been working for Adventist Health International at hospitals in ...Read More

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MRI Research at UCSF Could Help Diagnose Dyslexia Even Earlier in Children

KQED Science | September 29, 2014 | 0 Comments

MRI Research at UCSF Could Help Diagnose Dyslexia Even Earlier in Children

UCSF researchers aim to predict whether children will develop dyslexia before they show signs of reading and speech problems, using a variety of methods including MRI brain scans.

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How Big Data Is Changing Medicine

KQED Science | September 29, 2014 | 3 Comments

How Big Data Is Changing Medicine

Used to be that medical researchers came up with a theory, recruited subjects, and gathered data, sometimes for years. Now, the answers are already there in data collections on the cloud. All researchers need is the right question.

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