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Study: Napa Quake Should Spur Retrofits to Older Buildings

KQED Science | March 3, 2015 | 0 Comments

Study: Napa Quake Should Spur Retrofits to Older Buildings

The Bay Area's worst shaker in 25 years revealed -- once again -- where the vulnerabilities are.

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A New, Stronger Tunnel to Bring Hetch Hetchy Water to the Bay Area

KQED Science | March 2, 2015 | 0 Comments

A New, Stronger Tunnel to Bring Hetch Hetchy Water to the Bay Area

The San Francisco Public Utilities opened on Friday a new cement-encased, steel-lined tunnel that runs from Sunol Valley to Fremont. It will carry an average of 265 million gallons of water a day for customers of the Hetch Hetchy Water System Improvement Program, which consists of more than 80 projects to seismically retrofit and upgrade an 80-year-old water system serving 2.6 million people in the Bay Area.

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Experts Recommend How to Deal With Artificial Earthquakes

KQED Science | February 19, 2015 | 0 Comments

Experts Recommend How to Deal With Artificial Earthquakes

Scientists must play catch-up to industry as we figure out ways to use the deep underground without triggering earthquakes.

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State Proposes Rules to Protect Drinking Water From Fracking Waste

KQED Science | February 10, 2015 | 1 Comment

State Proposes Rules to Protect Drinking Water From Fracking Waste

Under pressure from a federal deadline and amid news reports that state regulators allowed oil companies to inject wastewater into aquifers clean enough to drink from, officials outlined plans for new safeguards.

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Scientists Tune in to the Earth’s Ambient Hum

KQED Science | February 6, 2015 | 0 Comments

Scientists Tune in to the Earth’s Ambient Hum

The background noise of the deep Earth resembles the random behavior of the sea surface. But advanced techniques can extract robust data from these whispers of information and help save marine life.

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The Supposedly Dry Little World of the Asteroid Vesta Reveals Signs of Water

KQED Science | January 29, 2015 | 0 Comments

The Supposedly Dry Little World of the Asteroid Vesta Reveals Signs of Water

The large asteroid Vesta has added flows of material rich in water to its bag of tricks. It's just one more way this small world acts like a proper planet.

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NASA Satellite Could Help Weather Forecasts, Drought Management

KQED Science | January 28, 2015 | 1 Comment

NASA Satellite Could Help Weather Forecasts, Drought Management

Newest Earth science mission could extend the accuracy range of weather forecasts, fine-tune flood forecasts.

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When Finding Faults, Geologists Must Sometimes Become Ditch-Diggers

KQED Science | January 22, 2015 | 0 Comments

When Finding Faults, Geologists Must Sometimes Become Ditch-Diggers

For geologists, even with the advent of modern technology, there are instances when older methods are more effective; picks and shovels are sometimes the best complementary tools available for trenching studies.

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New Climate Research Suggests Acceleration of Sea Level Rise

KQED Science | January 15, 2015 | 0 Comments

New Climate Research Suggests Acceleration of Sea Level Rise

A reassessment of historical data suggests that compared to previous estimates, the world's sea level rose more slowly during the 20th century—and is rising faster now.

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New Soil Erosion Study May Help Sustainable Farming Practices

KQED Science | January 8, 2015 | 1 Comment

New Soil Erosion Study May Help Sustainable Farming Practices

A new way of measuring soil erosion in the geologically recent past, before modern civilization, may help put sustainable agriculture on a firmer footing.

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Next Napa Quake Could Be Bigger, Stronger

KQED Science | December 19, 2014 | 0 Comments

Next Napa Quake Could Be Bigger, Stronger

New research indicates the fault that triggered the August quake is 20 miles longer than scientists realized, which could produce more powerful earthquakes in the future.

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Dinosaur Extinction: New Research Favors Volcanism as Cause

KQED Science | December 18, 2014 | 0 Comments

Dinosaur Extinction: New Research Favors Volcanism as Cause

A new set of rock dates have pushed volcanism back into the debate over the extinction of the dinosaurs.

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L.A.’s “Resilience By Design” Report Lays Out Ambitious Earthquake Infrastructure Plan

KQED Science | December 11, 2014 | 0 Comments

L.A.’s “Resilience By Design” Report Lays Out Ambitious Earthquake Infrastructure Plan

The just-released seismic resiliency plan for Los Angeles goes beyond just saving lives; it hopes to ensure that the nation's second-largest city will still work after a magnitude 7.8 earthquake.

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Earth’s Most Common Mineral is Bagged and Tagged: Meet Bridgmanite

KQED Science | December 4, 2014 | 0 Comments

Earth’s Most Common Mineral is Bagged and Tagged: Meet Bridgmanite

Thanks to a meteorite collected in 1879, we have finally given a name to the most abundant mineral in Earth. Here's why it took so long to christen this stuff.

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The Hidden Perils of Permafrost

KQED Science | December 2, 2014 | 0 Comments

The Hidden Perils of Permafrost

For thousands of years, mysterious bacteria have remained dormant in the Arctic permafrost. Now, a warming climate threatens to bring them back to life. What does that mean for the rest of us?

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Using 3D Visualization, Geologists Explore the Complex Areas Where Faults Join and Split

KQED Science | November 20, 2014 | 0 Comments

Using 3D Visualization, Geologists Explore the Complex Areas Where Faults Join and Split

The cutting edge in earthquake research is mapping our most important faults in three-dimensional detail. A new paper finds some key hidden links in the Bay Area's fault system.

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Want to Go to Mars? A Cheaper Alternative Resides in Chile’s Atacama Desert

KQED Science | November 19, 2014 | 1 Comment

Want to Go to Mars? A Cheaper Alternative Resides in Chile’s Atacama Desert

If you want to go to Mars but can’t quite afford the hundreds of billions of dollars for a ticket, there is another solution: consider instead a trip to the Atacama Desert in Chile.

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What Can We Learn from the Italian Earthquake Trial?

KQED Science | November 13, 2014 | 0 Comments

What Can We Learn from the Italian Earthquake Trial?

When a court convicted earthquake scientists of manslaughter, seismologists everywhere feared the worst for their own efforts at informing the public. After the convictions were overturned on appeal this week, experts, journalists and the general public can consider the wider lessons learned.

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Yosemite’s Tuolumne Meadows: A Long-standing Geological Puzzle

KQED Science | November 6, 2014 | 0 Comments

Yosemite’s Tuolumne Meadows: A Long-standing Geological Puzzle

The iconic Tuolumne Meadows, in the high Sierra, is a geological puzzle. A newly published study traces the roots of the meadows to an incident deep in time and deep below the ground.

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The Amazing Life of Sand

KQED Science | November 4, 2014 | 0 Comments

The Amazing Life of Sand

There’s a story in every grain of sand: tales of life and death, fire and water. If you scooped up a handful of sand from every beach, you'd have a history of the world sifting through your fingers. From mountain boulders to the shells of tiny ocean creatures, follow the journey that sand takes through thousands of years across entire continents to wind up stuck between your toes.

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