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Next Napa Quake Could Be Bigger, Stronger

KQED Science | December 19, 2014 | 0 Comments

Next Napa Quake Could Be Bigger, Stronger

New research indicates the fault that triggered the August quake is 20 miles longer than scientists realized, which could produce more powerful earthquakes in the future.

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Dinosaur Extinction: New Research Favors Volcanism as Cause

KQED Science | December 18, 2014 | 0 Comments

Dinosaur Extinction: New Research Favors Volcanism as Cause

A new set of rock dates have pushed volcanism back into the debate over the extinction of the dinosaurs.

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L.A.’s “Resilience By Design” Report Lays Out Ambitious Earthquake Infrastructure Plan

KQED Science | December 11, 2014 | 0 Comments

L.A.’s “Resilience By Design” Report Lays Out Ambitious Earthquake Infrastructure Plan

The just-released seismic resiliency plan for Los Angeles goes beyond just saving lives; it hopes to ensure that the nation's second-largest city will still work after a magnitude 7.8 earthquake.

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Earth’s Most Common Mineral is Bagged and Tagged: Meet Bridgmanite

KQED Science | December 4, 2014 | 0 Comments

Earth’s Most Common Mineral is Bagged and Tagged: Meet Bridgmanite

Thanks to a meteorite collected in 1879, we have finally given a name to the most abundant mineral in Earth. Here's why it took so long to christen this stuff.

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The Hidden Perils of Permafrost

KQED Science | December 2, 2014 | 0 Comments

The Hidden Perils of Permafrost

For thousands of years, mysterious bacteria have remained dormant in the Arctic permafrost. Now, a warming climate threatens to bring them back to life. What does that mean for the rest of us?

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Using 3D Visualization, Geologists Explore the Complex Areas Where Faults Join and Split

KQED Science | November 20, 2014 | 0 Comments

Using 3D Visualization, Geologists Explore the Complex Areas Where Faults Join and Split

The cutting edge in earthquake research is mapping our most important faults in three-dimensional detail. A new paper finds some key hidden links in the Bay Area's fault system.

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Want to Go to Mars? A Cheaper Alternative Resides in Chile’s Atacama Desert

KQED Science | November 19, 2014 | 1 Comment

Want to Go to Mars? A Cheaper Alternative Resides in Chile’s Atacama Desert

If you want to go to Mars but can’t quite afford the hundreds of billions of dollars for a ticket, there is another solution: consider instead a trip to the Atacama Desert in Chile.

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What Can We Learn from the Italian Earthquake Trial?

KQED Science | November 13, 2014 | 0 Comments

What Can We Learn from the Italian Earthquake Trial?

When a court convicted earthquake scientists of manslaughter, seismologists everywhere feared the worst for their own efforts at informing the public. After the convictions were overturned on appeal this week, experts, journalists and the general public can consider the wider lessons learned.

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Yosemite’s Tuolumne Meadows: A Long-standing Geological Puzzle

KQED Science | November 6, 2014 | 0 Comments

Yosemite’s Tuolumne Meadows: A Long-standing Geological Puzzle

The iconic Tuolumne Meadows, in the high Sierra, is a geological puzzle. A newly published study traces the roots of the meadows to an incident deep in time and deep below the ground.

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The Amazing Life of Sand

KQED Science | November 4, 2014 | 0 Comments

The Amazing Life of Sand

There’s a story in every grain of sand: tales of life and death, fire and water. If you scooped up a handful of sand from every beach, you'd have a history of the world sifting through your fingers. From mountain boulders to the shells of tiny ocean creatures, follow the journey that sand takes through thousands of years across entire continents to wind up stuck between your toes.

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With Residential Retrofit Scheme, Oakland Enters Next Phase of Quakeproofing

KQED Science | October 30, 2014 | 0 Comments

With Residential Retrofit Scheme, Oakland Enters Next Phase of Quakeproofing

Oakland gains character as well as affordable housing from its stock of small and mid-sized apartment buildings. A retrofit plan is being prepared to strengthen this crucial part of the city's fabric against earthquake damage.

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2014/10/29/should-fracking-be-banned/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=should-fracking-be-banned target=_blank >Should Fracking Be Banned?</a>

QUEST | October 29, 2014

Should Fracking Be Banned?

From KQED Education Do Now: On Tuesday, November 4, 2014 three counties in California will decide by ballot whether or not to ban hydraulic fracturing, otherwise known as “fracking.” It’s steeped in controversy, from the amount of water it uses to how and where that water--and added chemicals--are eventually disposed. Should fracking be banned? Why or why not?

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Activists Push for Public Review of Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant

KQED Science | October 29, 2014 | 1 Comment

Activists Push for Public Review of Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant

An environmental group claims there are unanswered questions about the seismic safety of the Central Coast plant.

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South Napa Quake Offers Key Test for Real-Time GPS Detection

KQED Science | October 23, 2014 | 0 Comments

South Napa Quake Offers Key Test for Real-Time GPS Detection

The familiar GPS system is being enlisted to help improve earthquake shaking alerts; an experimental system is now operating at the Berkeley Seismological Laboratory.

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New Paper Outlines Updated Look on San Andreas Fault System

KQED Science | October 16, 2014 | 0 Comments

New Paper Outlines Updated Look on San Andreas Fault System

A new study from our local earthquake experts has put new and clearer numbers on the risk of large earthquakes in the Bay Area's future--evidence of new progress in this slow process of enlightenment.

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Bay Area Remembers the Loma Prieta Earthquake

KQED Science | October 15, 2014 | 1 Comment

Bay Area Remembers the Loma Prieta Earthquake

The 25th Anniversary of the Loma Prieta quake comes up on Friday, and the Bay Area is full of commemorative events, as well as resource fairs to help people prepare for future quakes.

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2014/10/14/145343/long_after_fracking_stops_the_noise_lives_on?source=npr&category=science target=_blank >Long After Fracking Stops, The Noise Lives On</a>

KQED News | October 14, 2014

Long After Fracking Stops, The Noise Lives On

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. ...Read More

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25 Years After the Loma Prieta Earthquake, Are We Safer?

KQED Science | October 13, 2014 | 1 Comment

25 Years After the Loma Prieta Earthquake, Are We Safer?

Bay Area taxpayers have spent billions of dollars over the last quarter-century to make our bridges, water pipes and power supplies safer in an earthquake. Experts say that means the Bay Area is much better off now. At the same time, the work is far from over.

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Join a Series of Geological Treasure Hunts With Earth Science Week 2014

KQED Science | October 9, 2014 | 1 Comment

Join a Series of Geological Treasure Hunts With Earth Science Week 2014

The annual open-ended celebration of geology and its related sciences takes place all this coming week. See what's happening and where to take part.

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Computer-Generated Molecular Models Promise Greener Concrete

KQED Science | October 2, 2014 | 0 Comments

Computer-Generated Molecular Models Promise Greener Concrete

More precisely targeted cement would use less calcium and use less energy to create it. A study at MIT exploring the molecular structure of cement promises substantial energy and greenhouse-gas savings in this crucial technology.

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