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South Napa Quake: What Scientists Know So Far

KQED Science | August 25, 2014 | 0 Comments

South Napa Quake: What Scientists Know So Far

Scientists are still trying to find out more about the fault where Sunday’s earthquake occurred. They are focusing on the small West Napa Fault.

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UC Berkeley System Gave Early Warning of South Napa Earthquake

KQED Science | August 24, 2014 | 25 Comments

UC Berkeley System Gave Early Warning of South Napa Earthquake

Ten seconds before the South Napa Earthquake struck, UC Berkeley’s ShakeAlert predicted the quake.

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What Causes Earthquakes?

KQED Science | August 24, 2014 | 1 Comment

What Causes Earthquakes?

The earth is constantly shifting and the Earth’s crust is broken up into many rocky plates, like pieces of a puzzle.

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Epic Drought in West Is Literally Moving Mountains

KQED Science | August 21, 2014 | 0 Comments

Epic Drought in West Is Literally Moving Mountains

Some parts of California’s mountains have been uplifted by as much as half an inch in the past 18 months because the massive amount of water lost in the drought is no longer weighing down the land, causing it to rise a bit like an uncoiled spring.

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New-Generation Earthquake Forecasting Swings into Operation in Italy

KQED Science | August 21, 2014 | 0 Comments

New-Generation Earthquake Forecasting Swings into Operation in Italy

Italy is approaching the next frontier in earthquake forecasting: an "operational" system that will make quake forecasts routine, whose contents we can take in stride.

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Parks Attract Affluent Homeowners to Earthquake Fault Zones Despite Risks

KQED Science | August 14, 2014 | 1 Comment

Parks Attract Affluent Homeowners to Earthquake Fault Zones Despite Risks

The Alquist-Priolo law keeps new homes away from active earthquake faults. But a study finds that the resulting 'fault zone parks' attract wealthy residents despite the seismic hazard.

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A Simple Mineral Has Geochemical Power That Helps Spark Life

KQED Science | August 7, 2014 | 0 Comments

A Simple Mineral Has Geochemical Power That Helps Spark Life

New work shows that the simple mineral sphalerite has geochemical powers suitable for helping life to arise from precursors in the mineral kingdom.

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The ‘Tahoe Tsunami’: New Study Envisions Early Geologic Event

KQED Science | July 31, 2014 | 0 Comments

The ‘Tahoe Tsunami’: New Study Envisions Early Geologic Event

A new paper marshals evidence detailing the catastrophic landslide and mega-tsunami that struck Lake Tahoe during the late Pleistocene.

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Oklahoma Study Offers Better Insight into Industrial Earthquakes

KQED Science | July 3, 2014 | 0 Comments

Oklahoma Study Offers Better Insight into Industrial Earthquakes

A new study adds strong evidence that deep-injection wells can occasionally nudge a fault into activity. The key is figuring out how it happens, then learning to avoid whatever is making it happen.

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Studying Exoplanets: What A Thousand Points of Light Might Reveal About Earth

KQED Science | June 26, 2014 | 0 Comments

Studying Exoplanets: What A Thousand Points of Light Might Reveal About Earth

As a flood of new exoplanets swim into our ken, we have ways of turning these pixel-size steams of data into insights about our own planet.

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New Evidence of Earth’s Deep Water Cycle Reveals A Virtual Buried Ocean

KQED Science | June 12, 2014 | 1 Comment

New Evidence of Earth’s Deep Water Cycle Reveals A Virtual Buried Ocean

New evidence from high-pressure experiments and earthquake waves suggests the presence of water-rich melt at the base of the upper mantle, far deeper than previous estimates.

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<a href=http://www.californiareport.org/archive/R201406120850/b target=_blank >Groundwater Pumping Causing Land to Sink in Coachella Valley</a>

The California Report | June 12, 2014

Groundwater Pumping Causing Land to Sink in Coachella Valley

Even before the drought, farmers around California were sucking down the groundwater faster than the environment could keep up. Now, the U.S. Geological Survey reports the practice has caused land in the Coachella Valley to sink up to two feet in some places. ...Read More

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Plastic Substance Created by Pollution Yields a New Word: Plastiglomerate

KQED Science | May 29, 2014 | 0 Comments

Plastic Substance Created by Pollution Yields a New Word: Plastiglomerate

When future geologists, whatever species they may be, look for our signs in the fossil record of the future, it may be this newly described amalgam of plastic and sediment.

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Progress in Earthquake Forecasts May Come from Studying Foreshocks

KQED Science | May 15, 2014 | 0 Comments

Progress in Earthquake Forecasts May Come from Studying Foreshocks

Recent cutting-edge techniques are opening a new approach for earthquake forecasts by matching foreshocks -- small quakes occurring on the same stretch of fault that subsequently fails in the large mainshock -- to changes on the seafloor.

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NOAA Expedition Finds Asphalt Volcanic ‘Tar Lilies’ in Gulf of Mexico

KQED Science | May 1, 2014 | 0 Comments

NOAA Expedition Finds Asphalt Volcanic ‘Tar Lilies’ in Gulf of Mexico

A research expedition in the Gulf of Mexico has stumbled on a field of beautiful natural sculptures made of asphalt on the sea floor.

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Auburn Dam: The Water Project That Won’t Die

KQED Science | April 30, 2014 | 3 Comments

Auburn Dam: The Water Project That Won’t Die

The giant dam and reservoir remains on the radar, whether or not it has a future.

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California Edging Closer to Regulating Groundwater for the First Time

KQED Science | April 22, 2014 | 11 Comments

California Edging Closer to Regulating Groundwater for the First Time

Power players in California water policy seem to agree for once: It's time to get serious about groundwater.

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Biologists’ Paradox: Killing and Collecting Rare Creatures to Prove They’re Not Extinct

KQED Science | April 17, 2014 | 2 Comments

Biologists’ Paradox: Killing and Collecting Rare Creatures to Prove They’re Not Extinct

A group of biologists asks their peers to start documenting newly discovered and "rediscovered" species by non-destructive techniques instead of killing a specimen to bring home.

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New Stanford Study Examines Geologic Impact of a Massive Asteroid Collision on Ancient Earth

KQED Science | April 10, 2014 | 1 Comment

New Stanford Study Examines Geologic Impact of a Massive Asteroid Collision on Ancient Earth

A new paper attempts to describe a realistic picture of the unimaginable: a colossal cosmic impact that left a crater 500 kilometers across on the ancient Earth.

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Study Reveals New Suspect in the ‘Great Dying’ Mass Extinction Murder Mystery

KQED Science | April 3, 2014 | 4 Comments

Study Reveals New Suspect in the ‘Great Dying’ Mass Extinction Murder Mystery

The latest microbial hypothesis published in a recent paper addresses the ongoing drama of the "Great Dying", a monstrously deadly event that occurred about 250 million years ago and drove some 90 percent of the world's species to extinction.

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