Donate

RSSGeology

Stegosaurus, Male or Female? The Answer Is in the Plates

KQED Science | April 23, 2015 | 1 Comment

Stegosaurus, Male or Female? The Answer Is in the Plates

A young paleontologist has figured out how to tell male and female stegosaurs apart from the rows of plates upon their backs.

Continue Reading

Fossil Study Detects Another Mass Extinction in the Deep Past

KQED Science | April 16, 2015 | 1 Comment

Fossil Study Detects Another Mass Extinction in the Deep Past

A new study of fossils on an island in the Arctic Ocean show a major episode of extinction that qualifies as a new "great dying."

Continue Reading

The Great 1815 Tambora Eruption: What if This Volcano Blew Today?

KQED Science | April 9, 2015 | 1 Comment

The Great 1815 Tambora Eruption: What if This Volcano Blew Today?

Tambora brought the world a taste of apocalypse 200 years ago. Today we have better tools to monitor volcanoes like it, but the next eruption of its size will still challenge civilization.

Continue Reading

The Anthropocene: An Epoch Mistake?

KQED Science | April 2, 2015 | 2 Comments

The Anthropocene: An Epoch Mistake?

The "Anthropocene," a geology-style name for the present human-dominated era of Earth history, has gotten lots of exposure. But geologists themselves have mixed feelings about actually using it.

Continue Reading

Tsunami Preparedness Week: Building a Network of Awareness

KQED Science | March 26, 2015 | 0 Comments

Tsunami Preparedness Week: Building a Network of Awareness

Tsunamis are a worldwide menace with specific local threats. It pays to learn your local situation and keep the knowledge fresh in your community.

Continue Reading

After an Earthquake, Use Your Phone Camera – For Science

KQED Science | March 19, 2015 | 1 Comment

After an Earthquake, Use Your Phone Camera – For Science

Large earthquakes are in our future. When one strikes, there are ways you can help scientists study the event using your phone.

Continue Reading

South American Peaks Contain 2000-Year Record of Lead in the Air

KQED Science | March 12, 2015 | 0 Comments

South American Peaks Contain 2000-Year Record of Lead in the Air

New data from the ancient ice of a tropical glacier shows that lead in gasoline tainted the Earth with the toxic metal far more than any other source, past or present, human or natural.

Continue Reading

Ancient Sinkhole Could Presage Mega-Tsunami for Hawaii

KQED Science | March 9, 2015 | 0 Comments

Ancient Sinkhole Could Presage Mega-Tsunami for Hawaii

There's buried treasure here for tsunami hunters, but scarce funding may mean Hawaii remains vulnerable.

Continue Reading

Scientists Discover Natural Glass Created by Volcanoes and Lightning

KQED Science | March 5, 2015 | 0 Comments

Scientists Discover Natural Glass Created by Volcanoes and Lightning

Geologists are familiar with something most of us have never seen—spherules, or microscopic balls of natural glass that hide in sediments all over the world. A new study reports a previously unknown kind of spherule that’s forged during volcanic eruptions as lightning lashes roiling clouds of hot ash.

Continue Reading

Study: Napa Quake Should Spur Retrofits to Older Buildings

KQED Science | March 3, 2015 | 0 Comments

Study: Napa Quake Should Spur Retrofits to Older Buildings

The Bay Area's worst shaker in 25 years revealed -- once again -- where the vulnerabilities are.

Continue Reading

A New, Stronger Tunnel to Bring Hetch Hetchy Water to the Bay Area

KQED Science | March 2, 2015 | 0 Comments

A New, Stronger Tunnel to Bring Hetch Hetchy Water to the Bay Area

The San Francisco Public Utilities opened on Friday a new cement-encased, steel-lined tunnel that runs from Sunol Valley to Fremont. It will carry an average of 265 million gallons of water a day for customers of the Hetch Hetchy Water System Improvement Program, which consists of more than 80 projects to seismically retrofit and upgrade an 80-year-old water system serving 2.6 million people in the Bay Area.

Continue Reading

Experts Recommend How to Deal With Artificial Earthquakes

KQED Science | February 19, 2015 | 0 Comments

Experts Recommend How to Deal With Artificial Earthquakes

Scientists must play catch-up to industry as we figure out ways to use the deep underground without triggering earthquakes.

Continue Reading

State Proposes Rules to Protect Drinking Water From Fracking Waste

KQED Science | February 10, 2015 | 1 Comment

State Proposes Rules to Protect Drinking Water From Fracking Waste

Under pressure from a federal deadline and amid news reports that state regulators allowed oil companies to inject wastewater into aquifers clean enough to drink from, officials outlined plans for new safeguards.

Continue Reading

Scientists Tune in to the Earth’s Ambient Hum

KQED Science | February 6, 2015 | 0 Comments

Scientists Tune in to the Earth’s Ambient Hum

The background noise of the deep Earth resembles the random behavior of the sea surface. But advanced techniques can extract robust data from these whispers of information and help save marine life.

Continue Reading

The Supposedly Dry Little World of the Asteroid Vesta Reveals Signs of Water

KQED Science | January 29, 2015 | 0 Comments

The Supposedly Dry Little World of the Asteroid Vesta Reveals Signs of Water

The large asteroid Vesta has added flows of material rich in water to its bag of tricks. It's just one more way this small world acts like a proper planet.

Continue Reading

NASA Satellite Could Help Weather Forecasts, Drought Management

KQED Science | January 28, 2015 | 1 Comment

NASA Satellite Could Help Weather Forecasts, Drought Management

Newest Earth science mission could extend the accuracy range of weather forecasts, fine-tune flood forecasts.

Continue Reading

When Finding Faults, Geologists Must Sometimes Become Ditch-Diggers

KQED Science | January 22, 2015 | 0 Comments

When Finding Faults, Geologists Must Sometimes Become Ditch-Diggers

For geologists, even with the advent of modern technology, there are instances when older methods are more effective; picks and shovels are sometimes the best complementary tools available for trenching studies.

Continue Reading

New Climate Research Suggests Acceleration of Sea Level Rise

KQED Science | January 15, 2015 | 0 Comments

New Climate Research Suggests Acceleration of Sea Level Rise

A reassessment of historical data suggests that compared to previous estimates, the world's sea level rose more slowly during the 20th century—and is rising faster now.

Continue Reading

New Soil Erosion Study May Help Sustainable Farming Practices

KQED Science | January 8, 2015 | 1 Comment

New Soil Erosion Study May Help Sustainable Farming Practices

A new way of measuring soil erosion in the geologically recent past, before modern civilization, may help put sustainable agriculture on a firmer footing.

Continue Reading

Next Napa Quake Could Be Bigger, Stronger

KQED Science | December 19, 2014 | 0 Comments

Next Napa Quake Could Be Bigger, Stronger

New research indicates the fault that triggered the August quake is 20 miles longer than scientists realized, which could produce more powerful earthquakes in the future.

Continue Reading