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Raising Shasta Dam and the Flooding of a “Cathedral”

KQED Science | September 20, 2013 | 1 Comment

Raising Shasta Dam and the Flooding of a “Cathedral”

A plan to raise the height of Shasta Dam hangs over a small tribe of Indians who say it would drown their cultural heritage.

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Click to “Like” My Genome: Home Genetic Testing Goes Social

KQED Science | September 12, 2013 | 0 Comments

Click to “Like” My Genome: Home Genetic Testing Goes Social

Before gene sequencing, life was a like a video game: you’d run along, dealing with obstacles as they came up. Now we can learn more about what genetic dangers may lay ahead. KQED Science producer Arwen Curry decided to get in the game.

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How Do These Boats Sail Faster Than the Wind?

KQED Science | September 11, 2013 | 5 Comments

How Do These Boats Sail Faster Than the Wind?

It isn’t magic; it’s just physics. And it’s an idea as simple as rocket science, which in this case really breaks down to what you learned from riding a bike.

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New Women-only Hacking Event Smashes the ‘Google Glass Ceiling’

KQED Science | September 6, 2013 | 4 Comments

New Women-only Hacking Event Smashes the ‘Google Glass Ceiling’

The first "Women Hacking Glass" meetup, a new monthly gathering for women developers interested in creating apps for Google Glass, was hosted at Mozilla headquarters in downtown San Francisco.

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Stanford Students Unveil a Model Affordable Green Home

KQED Science | September 4, 2013 | 0 Comments

Stanford Students Unveil a Model Affordable Green Home

The one-bedroom, one-bath cottage is their entry in the Department of Energy’s biennial Solar Decathlon, in which students from around the world compete to design the most affordable green dwelling.

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Now Open, What Will Be the Next Steps for the Bay Bridge’s New Bicycle and Pedestrian Path?

KQED Science | September 4, 2013 | 2 Comments

Now Open, What Will Be the Next Steps for the Bay Bridge’s New Bicycle and Pedestrian Path?

Thousands of cyclists and residents from the Bay Area have already walked or biked across the new bicycle and pedestrian bike path on the eastern span of the Bay Bridge, which officially opened at noon on Tuesday. But one common question many cyclists have: Will the path eventually reach San Francisco?

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New Portable Device Rapidly Measures Radiation Exposure

KQED Science | September 3, 2013 | 6 Comments

New Portable Device Rapidly Measures Radiation Exposure

Local scientists have developed a small, portable device that can quickly test a person’s level of radiation exposure and could be used for victims in a large-scale radiological accident or terrorist attack.

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Is Raising Shasta Dam the Best Bet for California’s Water Supply?

KQED Science | August 16, 2013 | 7 Comments

Is Raising Shasta Dam the Best Bet for California’s Water Supply?

Shasta Lake is the largest reservoir in California, and government officials are completing plans to make it even larger by raising the height of the dam. But the expansion has sparked intense debates among local residents, Central Valley farmers, environmentalists, tribal groups and developers.

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Explorer’s Log: Chasing ‘Carrots’ Around Lake Tahoe With Google Glass

KQED Science | August 8, 2013 | 1 Comment

Explorer’s Log: Chasing ‘Carrots’ Around Lake Tahoe With Google Glass

After spending a few weeks getting familiar with the new Explorer edition of Google Glass, KQED Science's Jenny Oh takes it for a spin around Lake Tahoe.

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Explorer’s Log: My First Day With Google Glass

KQED Science | August 7, 2013 | 1 Comment

Explorer’s Log: My First Day With Google Glass

Follow the Google Glass Explorer adventures of Jenny Oh, an Interactive Producer for KQED Science, in a special multi-part series.

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Google Looking to Launch High-Flying Wireless Project

KQED Science | July 30, 2013 | 0 Comments

Google Looking to Launch High-Flying Wireless Project

Google is testing a project that would bring the internet to people in rural areas and developing nations via high-altitude balloons.

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Does Your Range Hood Suck? Cooking Spikes Indoor Air Pollution

KQED Science | July 26, 2013 | 9 Comments

Does Your Range Hood Suck? Cooking Spikes Indoor Air Pollution

When you're cooking dinner, the air inside your kitchen can sometimes be just as harmful as smog. Range hoods are designed to capture cooking fumes, but even some expensive models aren’t very effective. Researchers are trying to fix that.

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Put Your Smart Phone to Work Doing Real Science

KQED Science | July 25, 2013 | 2 Comments

Put Your Smart Phone to Work Doing Real Science

Your cell phone can now help research climate change, hunt for pulsars, or design new AIDS drugs, thanks to a new crowd computing phone app from UC Berkeley.

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East Bay Building Demolition to Provide Rare Earthquake Insights

KQED Science | July 22, 2013 | 0 Comments

East Bay Building Demolition to Provide Rare Earthquake Insights

Scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey are looking for volunteers in the East Bay to help document a powerful seismic event in mid-August, when a 13-story building on the California State University, East Bay campus will come crashing down, making way for a new, seismically stable replacement.

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As World’s Largest Solar Thermal Plant Opens, California Looks to End Solar Wars

KQED Science | July 12, 2013 | 41 Comments

As World’s Largest Solar Thermal Plant Opens, California Looks to End Solar Wars

After controversy over a threatened species delayed several large solar projects, state officials are trying to broker an agreement between conservation groups and solar companies on a path forward for renewable energy.

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Air Travel: Why that Sardine Can of a Coach Section Could Save You

KQED Science | July 9, 2013 | 1 Comment

Air Travel: Why that Sardine Can of a Coach Section Could Save You

In the "bad roller coaster ride" of an aircraft mishap, that cramped coach seat might just save you.

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Engineers Study the Agility of Birds to Improve Robot Flight

KQED Science | July 3, 2013 | 0 Comments

Engineers Study the Agility of Birds to Improve Robot Flight

Birds are generally pretty good at flying. They turn corners, land on perches. They zip between branches in a forest. They don't get blown over and fall down when there's a sudden gust of wind. Flying robots, on the other hand, could use some improvement.

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Career Spotlight: Bioengineer

KQED Science | May 31, 2013 | 0 Comments

Career Spotlight: Bioengineer

Tejal Desai is a bioengineering professor at UC San Francisco who is investigating new treatments for diabetes. Using nanotechnology, she is developing a tiny capsule that contains pancreatic cells that produce insulin.

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State Puts $25 Billion Price Tag on Water Tunnel Plan

KQED Science | May 30, 2013 | 2 Comments

State Puts $25 Billion Price Tag on Water Tunnel Plan

Multi-billion dollar infrastructure projects generally aren’t built without an appearance of urgency. The Brown Administration visited the high-tech capital of California to make its case for the $24.54 billion plan for the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta.

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<a href=http://blogs.kqed.org/newsfix/2013/05/24/98087/usgs-seeks-earthquake-scanners target=_blank >USGS Seeking New Homes for Earthquake Sensors in East Bay Hills</a>

KQED News | May 25, 2013

USGS Seeking New Homes for Earthquake Sensors in East Bay Hills

Map of area for new seismic monitors (USGS). The U.S. Geological Survey is seeking homes for around 30 new seismic sensors in the East Bay. The sensors help scientists better understand how earthquakes behave, and also contribute to the ongoing … Continue reading

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