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In California Drought, Desperation May Make Water Flow Uphill

KQED Science | April 22, 2014 | 0 Comments

In California Drought, Desperation May Make Water Flow Uphill

A 47-mile section of the California Aqueduct, the main artery of the state's water system, could be engineered to flow backward this summer.

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Drones: The Newest Water-Saving Tool for Parched Farms

KQED Science | April 21, 2014 | 1 Comment

Drones: The Newest Water-Saving Tool for Parched Farms

Farmers are looking to the sky for the latest water-saving tool. But will aviation authorities allow it?

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California Farmers Look to Oil Industry for Water

KQED Science | April 7, 2014 | 6 Comments

California Farmers Look to Oil Industry for Water

As water supplies tighten for California farmers, some are looking to an unlikely new source: a water recycling project in one of the state's oldest oil fields.

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How Water and Oil Mix in California

KQED Science | March 31, 2014 | 0 Comments

How Water and Oil Mix in California

California is the third-largest oil producing state in the country. To produce oil, companies deal with massive amounts of water. They need it for hydraulic fracturing, and they produce a lot from underground.

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With Drought, New Scrutiny Over Fracking’s Water Use

KQED Science | March 31, 2014 | 5 Comments

With Drought, New Scrutiny Over Fracking’s Water Use

The drought is putting a spotlight on water use around California, including for hydraulic fracturing. How much water does fracking use and will it increase as companies tap into the Monterey Shale, estimated to be the largest oil resource in country?

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Three Years After Disaster, Crescent City Sports a New ‘Tsunami-Resistant’ Harbor

KQED Science | March 11, 2014 | 0 Comments

Three Years After Disaster, Crescent City Sports a New ‘Tsunami-Resistant’ Harbor

A wave generated by Japan's monstrous Tohoku earthquake destroyed Crescent City's fishing harbor. Engineers say the new design should withstand a 50-year event.

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/video/highway-to-hydrogen-fuel-cell-vehicles/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=highway-to-hydrogen-fuel-cell-vehicles target=_blank >Highway to Hydrogen</a>

QUEST | March 11, 2014

Highway to Hydrogen

Auto makers have spent decades and billions of dollars to develop hydrogen fuel cell cars, but only a few hundred of them are on the nation's roads. Now new refueling stations are in development and new models have recently been unveiled.

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Can Cultivating Compassion Lead to Happiness?

KQED Science | March 4, 2014 | 0 Comments

Can Cultivating Compassion Lead to Happiness?

Compassion makes us happy, but the internet makes us jerks. Is there a way to cultivate kindness in the digital age?

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California Drought One More Setback for River That Runs Dry

KQED Science | February 24, 2014 | 0 Comments

California Drought One More Setback for River That Runs Dry

Just as salmon are being returned to the San Joaquin River, the extreme drought is bringing political heat to one of the most ambitious environmental restoration efforts in the state.

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Leaky Natural Gas Pipes Are a Bigger Problem Than Previously Thought

KQED Science | February 13, 2014 | 0 Comments

Leaky Natural Gas Pipes Are a Bigger Problem Than Previously Thought

U.S. could make substantial reductions in greenhouse gas emissions by stopping methane leaks from natural gas pipelines, says a new Stanford study.

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One Step Closer to Nuclear Fusion Reactions

KQED Science | February 12, 2014 | 2 Comments

One Step Closer to Nuclear Fusion Reactions

Physicists at Lawrence Livermore National Lab's National Ignition Facility said they've taken a significant step toward achieving nuclear fusion ignition.

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2014/01/29/technologies-poised-to-keep-asian-carp-at-bay-slowed-by-challenges/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=technologies-poised-to-keep-asian-carp-at-bay-slowed-by-challenges target=_blank >Technologies Poised to Keep Asian Carp at Bay, Slowed by Challenges</a>

QUEST | January 29, 2014

Technologies Poised to Keep Asian Carp at Bay, Slowed by Challenges

In response to the major threats posed to the Great Lakes by invasive Asian carp, engineers have developed devices to keep them out, but delays in deciding how to implement them might give the fish an edge. ...Read More

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Ford Debuts Solar Hybrid

KQED Science | January 6, 2014 | 0 Comments

Ford Debuts Solar Hybrid

Ford Motor company is trying to be the first on the road with a solar powered car for everyday use. The company is unveiling its concept model at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas this week.

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2013: Progress, But Long Road Ahead to California Climate Goals

KQED Science | December 30, 2013 | 0 Comments

2013: Progress, But Long Road Ahead to California Climate Goals

Despite its deserved reputation for climate leadership, California will have to hustle to make its own long-range emissions goals.

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49ers Tackle Sustainability With New Green Stadium

KQED Science | December 23, 2013 | 5 Comments

49ers Tackle Sustainability With New Green Stadium

49ers fans may miss the cold weather at Candlestick Park, but can look forward to solar panels, bicycle parking and grass watered with recycled water. Levi’s Stadium in Santa Clara is being touted as the greenest stadium in the NFL.

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Money, Environmental Concerns Could Sink Governor’s Delta Water Plan

KQED Science | December 13, 2013 | 1 Comment

Money, Environmental Concerns Could Sink Governor’s Delta Water Plan

Governor Jerry Brown's Bay Delta Conservation Plan is now open for public comment. State officials say the water supply for 25 million Californians from the Bay Area to San Diego is at stake, as is the health of the largest estuary on the West Coast. But before it can move forward, the project needs money and buy-in from wary water district managers and skeptical federal regulators.

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With California’s Water Future at Stake, Delta Plan Inches Ahead

KQED Science | December 9, 2013 | 0 Comments

With California’s Water Future at Stake, Delta Plan Inches Ahead

California's $25 billion fix for the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta depends on making wildlife groups and water users happy. With the latest release of the state's plan, it's looking harder to do both.

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Memo to Bay Area Sea Rise Planners: Situation Serious But Not Hopeless

KQED Science | December 6, 2013 | 0 Comments

Memo to Bay Area Sea Rise Planners: Situation Serious But Not Hopeless

San Mateo County faces up to its high-water future--and gets some tips from one of climate adaptation's go-to guys.

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Activists Take Aim at Bay Area Crude Oil Projects

KQED Science | December 4, 2013 | 1 Comment

Activists Take Aim at Bay Area Crude Oil Projects

Local activists are sounding an alarm over four proposed crude oil projects in the Bay Area. They say they're concerned about the health and environmental implications of the developments.

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Mad About Mud: Debate Heats up Over Waste From Oil & Gas Wells

KQED Science | December 3, 2013 | 0 Comments

Mad About Mud: Debate Heats up Over Waste From Oil & Gas Wells

Drilling mud is the slick concoction used to cool and lubricate a drill bit, and it’s used for all kinds of wells, including oil and gas. Environmental groups are turning their attention to drilling mud, which is currently exempted from water monitoring.

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