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Railroads, Big Oil Move to Ease Fears Over Crude Shipments

KQED Science | February 24, 2015 | 2 Comments

Railroads, Big Oil Move to Ease Fears Over Crude Shipments

Railroads and oil companies stage a show-and-tell in Sacramento to highlight safety measures they've put in place. Environmentalists and community activists remain skeptical.

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A Visit to Apple’s Secret New Headquarters

KQED Science | February 23, 2015 | 1 Comment

A Visit to Apple’s Secret New Headquarters

From the dust of the former Hewlett Packard campus in Cupertino, a glass and concrete ring is taking shape. Apple is building a new headquarters, and it's going to be bigger than the Pentagon. KQED got a tour and a look at the campus' green features.

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Banana Slugs: Secret of the Slime

KQED Science | February 17, 2015 | 1 Comment

Banana Slugs: Secret of the Slime

Beneath the towering redwoods lives one of the most peculiar creatures in California: the banana slug. They're coated with a liquid crystal ooze that solves many problems slugs face in the forest -- and maybe some of our own.

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Lessons for the Digital Age From a 500-Year-Old Publishing Revolution

KQED Science | February 8, 2015 | 0 Comments

Lessons for the Digital Age From a 500-Year-Old Publishing Revolution

In the Internet age, many scientists are questioning the traditional publishing model. As we flounder through the digital revolution, it's intriguing to look back at the print revolution of the early Renaissance, which created comparable social and scientific upheaval.

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Building a Better Bionic Arm by Teaching the Brain a New Signal

KQED Science | February 2, 2015 | 2 Comments

Building a Better Bionic Arm by Teaching the Brain a New Signal

Even the best prosthetics today lack a natural sense that tells the brain where the body is in space. That makes it hard to comb the back of your hair, for example, or thread a belt.

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NASA Satellite Could Help Weather Forecasts, Drought Management

KQED Science | January 28, 2015 | 1 Comment

NASA Satellite Could Help Weather Forecasts, Drought Management

Newest Earth science mission could extend the accuracy range of weather forecasts, fine-tune flood forecasts.

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How Electric Light Changed the Night

KQED Science | January 20, 2015 | 4 Comments

How Electric Light Changed the Night

Artificial light makes the modern world possible. But not all kinds of light are good for us. Electric light has fundamentally altered our lives, our bodies and the very nature of our sleep.

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Interior Secretary: Local Fracking Bans Are ‘Wrong Way To Go’

KQED Science | January 2, 2015 | 25 Comments

Interior Secretary: Local Fracking Bans Are ‘Wrong Way To Go’

County and even statewide strictures are misguided, says federal lands chief.

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How California’s Water Rights Make It Tough to Manage Drought

KQED Science | December 8, 2014 | 12 Comments

How California’s Water Rights Make It Tough to Manage Drought

Here’s the thing: Water rights in California are based on who got there first. It’s as if you had to line up with all your coworkers to get a cup of coffee at work, and maybe the pot’s empty when the new guy gets to the front. Some are asking, in a drought like the one we’ve been having, is that really fair?

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<a href=http://ww2.kqed.org/news/2014/11/12/comet-landing-a-success-european-craft-makes-fairly-gentle-touch-down target=_blank >Where's Philae? Space Agency Narrows Search Area for Lost Comet Lander</a>

KQED News | November 21, 2014

Where's Philae? Space Agency Narrows Search Area for Lost Comet Lander

Philae made a thud, bounced, and hasn't been seen since by the Rosetta mother ship.

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Life Aboard a ‘Polar Roller': America’s Last Heavy Icebreaker

KQED Science | November 6, 2014 | 2 Comments

Life Aboard a ‘Polar Roller': America’s Last Heavy Icebreaker

And a trick to prevent seasickness that the skipper swears by (other than staying ashore).

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New California County Fracking Bans Likely to Face Challenges

KQED Science | November 5, 2014 | 1 Comment

New California County Fracking Bans Likely to Face Challenges

Passage of two out of three local measures may just set the stage for next battle.

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Aging U.S. Icebreaker Fleet May Imperil Polar Science

KQED Science | November 3, 2014 | 0 Comments

Aging U.S. Icebreaker Fleet May Imperil Polar Science

The last of the Coast Guard's big icebreakers departs San Francisco Bay this week, a rare sight on the Bay and a reminder that the U.S. is falling behind in the race for polar dominance -- and knowledge.

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Activists Push for Public Review of Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant

KQED Science | October 29, 2014 | 2 Comments

Activists Push for Public Review of Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant

An environmental group claims there are unanswered questions about the seismic safety of the Central Coast plant.

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Berkeley Lab Tackles Global Vaccine Delivery Problem with Portable Solar-Powered Fridge

KQED Science | October 27, 2014 | 0 Comments

Berkeley Lab Tackles Global Vaccine Delivery Problem with Portable Solar-Powered Fridge

Scientists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have developed a portable vaccine solar-power fridge designed to run without power for five days, so vaccines are still viable when they are delivered in remote countries.

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‘Bionic Eye’ Allows Some Blind People to See Light

KQED Science | October 27, 2014 | 1 Comment

‘Bionic Eye’ Allows Some Blind People to See Light

A California woman recently became the first person in the West to receive a new type of bionic eye, an implant that will help her see for the first time in nearly three decades.

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As More Crude Oil Rolls In, a Push for Better Track Inspection

KQED Science | October 22, 2014 | 1 Comment

As More Crude Oil Rolls In, a Push for Better Track Inspection

In response to concerns about the risks of crude by rail, Union Pacific has begun to boost its rail inspection program by dispatching vehicles with lasers that can find tiny track imperfections.

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25 Years After the Loma Prieta Earthquake, Are We Safer?

KQED Science | October 13, 2014 | 1 Comment

25 Years After the Loma Prieta Earthquake, Are We Safer?

Bay Area taxpayers have spent billions of dollars over the last quarter-century to make our bridges, water pipes and power supplies safer in an earthquake. Experts say that means the Bay Area is much better off now. At the same time, the work is far from over.

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With Drought, New Scrutiny Over Fracking’s Water Use

KQED Science | October 10, 2014 | 6 Comments

With Drought, New Scrutiny Over Fracking’s Water Use

The drought is putting a spotlight on water use around California, including for hydraulic fracturing. How much water does fracking use and will it increase as companies tap into the Monterey Shale, estimated to be the largest oil resource in country?

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Anti-Fracking Activists in California Take Fight to County Ballots

KQED Science | October 10, 2014 | 16 Comments

Anti-Fracking Activists in California Take Fight to County Ballots

Activists are hoping local residents will do what state legislators haven’t done -- shut down the controversial oil production technique known as hydraulic fracturing.

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