Donate

RSSChemistry

Carbon-Tracking Satellite Will Monitor Earth’s ‘Breathing’

KQED Science | June 30, 2014 | 0 Comments

Carbon-Tracking Satellite Will Monitor Earth’s ‘Breathing’

The data could yield a much more precise picture of how accumulating greenhouse gases will affect the planet.

Continue Reading

<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2014/06/04/138382/how_a_scientist_of_psychedelics_became_the_godfather_of_ecstasy?source=npr&category=science target=_blank >How A Scientist Of Psychedelics Became The 'Godfather Of Ecstasy'</a>

KQED News | June 4, 2014

How A Scientist Of Psychedelics Became The 'Godfather Of Ecstasy'

...Read More

Continue Reading

Drought Tech: How Solar Desalination Could Help Parched Farms

KQED Science | May 9, 2014 | 4 Comments

Drought Tech: How Solar Desalination Could Help Parched Farms

While coastal communities debate the merits of desalting seawater as a drought solution, a new approach to desalination could be a boon to farmers far inland.

Continue Reading

Consumer Gene Tests Face Uncertain Future

KQED Science | May 5, 2014 | 1 Comment

Consumer Gene Tests Face Uncertain Future

Personal genetics companies that offer health insights are working to satisfy federal regulators and keep up with changing science.

Continue Reading

California Farmers Look to Oil Industry for Water

KQED Science | April 7, 2014 | 6 Comments

California Farmers Look to Oil Industry for Water

As water supplies tighten for California farmers, some are looking to an unlikely new source: a water recycling project in one of the state's oldest oil fields.

Continue Reading

How Corrosive Water off the West Coast Threatens the Food Chain

KQED Science | March 17, 2014 | 0 Comments

How Corrosive Water off the West Coast Threatens the Food Chain

Earlier this year, managers at a hatchery near Vancouver, Canada said they lost three years' worth of scallops -- 10 million animals -- to acidic waters. Ocean acidification is worse off the West Coast than anywhere else in North America.

Continue Reading

California Takes Aim at Toxic Nap Mats, Paint Strippers

KQED Science | March 13, 2014 | 0 Comments

California Takes Aim at Toxic Nap Mats, Paint Strippers

Six years after voters passed the California Green Chemistry Initiative, the state lays out its plan to get toxic products off shelves.

Continue Reading

Why Distant Dust Storms Matter to California Rainfall

KQED Science | March 10, 2014 | 1 Comment

Why Distant Dust Storms Matter to California Rainfall

Scientists are finding that dust storms in Asia and Africa influence how much snow falls in the Sierra Nevada. The research could help make weather forecasting more accurate and improve how California manages its water supply.

Continue Reading

<a href=http://www.kqed.org/epArchive/R201403060900?pid=RD19 target=_blank >BPA-Free Plastics Linked to Adverse Human Health Effects</a>

Forum | March 6, 2014

BPA-Free Plastics Linked to Adverse Human Health Effects

A new investigation by Mother Jones magazine finds that plastics free of the controversial additive bisphenol-A (BPA) may actually be more harmful to humans than those containing it. Meanwhile, scientists continue to debate what doses of the chemical are harmful. We'll discuss the latest news on the controversy over plastics, ...Read More

Continue Reading

Are BPA-Free Plastics Any Safer?

KQED Science | March 5, 2014 | 0 Comments

Are BPA-Free Plastics Any Safer?

Studies have linked the chemical BPA, found in some plastics, to a host of health problems. Now lab tests have found that the chemicals used to replace BPA may be just as harmful.

Continue Reading

Fukushima Radiation on its Way to California, Scientists Say it Poses No Threat

KQED Science | February 24, 2014 | 4 Comments

Fukushima Radiation on its Way to California, Scientists Say it Poses No Threat

Scientists are testing samples and using models to try to zero in on when it will reach the California coast and how much there will be when it does.

Continue Reading

Seven Things to Know About the Sixth Mass Extinction

KQED Science | February 21, 2014 | 3 Comments

Seven Things to Know About the Sixth Mass Extinction

Elizabeth Kolbert’s book “The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History” centers around two premises: that humans are witnessing a very high rate of species extinction and that humans are causing much of it.

Continue Reading

Leaky Natural Gas Pipes Are a Bigger Problem Than Previously Thought

KQED Science | February 13, 2014 | 0 Comments

Leaky Natural Gas Pipes Are a Bigger Problem Than Previously Thought

U.S. could make substantial reductions in greenhouse gas emissions by stopping methane leaks from natural gas pipelines, says a new Stanford study.

Continue Reading

Science of Beer: Tapping the Power of Brewer’s Yeast

KQED Science | February 11, 2014 | 3 Comments

Science of Beer: Tapping the Power of Brewer’s Yeast

Whether it’s a lager or ale, sour or bitter, dark or light, most beer has one thing in common: yeast. KQED Science visits a commercial yeast laboratory and a local brewery to reveal how this key ingredient is a major player in both science history and beer production.

Continue Reading

<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2014/01/23/could-your-driveway-be-poisoning-your-kids/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=could-your-driveway-be-poisoning-your-kids target=_blank >Could your driveway be poisoning your kids?</a>

QUEST | January 23, 2014

Could your driveway be poisoning your kids?

Parking lots coated with coal tar, a gooey black waste product of steel manufacturing, shed the coatings at a high rate. This toxic residue is showing up in dust on nearby apartment surfaces. ...Read More

Continue Reading

As Toxics Regulations Increase, Companies Simply Switch Chemicals

KQED Science | January 16, 2014 | 0 Comments

As Toxics Regulations Increase, Companies Simply Switch Chemicals

A UCSF researcher explains how public pressure on makeup manufacturers seems to work, and why it's "common sense" to keep plastic dishware out of the microwave.

Continue Reading

Spare-the-Air Days: How They Make the Call

KQED Science | December 30, 2013 | 0 Comments

Spare-the-Air Days: How They Make the Call

Making the call a day ahead of time requires a blend of art and science -- and regulators aren't always right.

Continue Reading

It’s Official: Toxic Flame Retardants No Longer Required in Furniture

KQED Science | November 21, 2013 | 20 Comments

It’s Official: Toxic Flame Retardants No Longer Required in Furniture

California overturns a nearly 40-year-old law that made your sofa potentially menacing.

Continue Reading

Soy and Dry Ice Among San Francisco’s New Tricks to Banish City Graffiti

KQED Science | November 14, 2013 | 0 Comments

Soy and Dry Ice Among San Francisco’s New Tricks to Banish City Graffiti

San Francisco cleans up a lot of graffiti every year. In the past, the city has used standard industrial solvents for this task, but now, workers will be cleaning up with non-toxic materials, in an effort to protect people and reduce toxic runoff.

Continue Reading

Silicon Valley in Race for Battery Breakthrough

KQED Science | November 1, 2013 | 4 Comments

Silicon Valley in Race for Battery Breakthrough

The global battery race is on and the Bay Area is in it to win.

Continue Reading