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UC Berkeley Study Says Migratory Birds Use Infrasound to Avoid Storms

KQED Science | December 19, 2014 | 0 Comments

UC Berkeley Study Says Migratory Birds Use Infrasound to Avoid Storms

It’s well-known that daylight length is an important migratory trigger, but a new study from UC Berkeley finds birds use infrasound, or tones lower than the normal range of human hearing, to flee bad weather.

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Spineless: New Photography Collection Celebrates Our Undersea Cousins

KQED Science | December 16, 2014 | 0 Comments

Spineless: New Photography Collection Celebrates Our Undersea Cousins

A new book about marine invertebrates celebrates the sumptuous beauty of our lesser-known cousins.

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What Gives the Morpho Butterfly Its Magnificent Blue?

KQED Science | December 16, 2014 | 1 Comment

What Gives the Morpho Butterfly Its Magnificent Blue?

What does it mean to be blue? The wings of a Morpho butterfly are some of the most brilliant structures in nature, and yet they contain no blue pigment -- they harness the physics of light at the nanoscale.

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Getting Genetic-Based Health Data Just Got Easier in Canada and the U.K.

KQED Science | December 15, 2014 | 0 Comments

Getting Genetic-Based Health Data Just Got Easier in Canada and the U.K.

Here in the U.S., if you want to get health information from your direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic test, you need to use an online resource like Promethease. The same is no longer true in Canada and the U.K.

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Bay Area Rainfall Ushers in Mating Season for Amorous Amphibians

KQED Science | December 5, 2014 | 0 Comments

Bay Area Rainfall Ushers in Mating Season for Amorous Amphibians

Amphibians face tough times as nearly one-third of the species has already lost worldwide. Learn about our local amphibians and what the East Bay Regional Parks District is doing to protect them.

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The Hidden Perils of Permafrost

KQED Science | December 2, 2014 | 0 Comments

The Hidden Perils of Permafrost

For thousands of years, mysterious bacteria have remained dormant in the Arctic permafrost. Now, a warming climate threatens to bring them back to life. What does that mean for the rest of us?

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New Study Sheds Light On Two Regions of DNA Linked to Male Homosexuality

KQED Science | December 1, 2014 | 0 Comments

New Study Sheds Light On Two Regions of DNA Linked to Male Homosexuality

There is little doubt any more among the research community that sexual preference is a combination of both nature and nurture. In other words, it comes about because of both genes and the environment. The next questions to answer have more to do with how much each contributes and which genes and environmental factors are involved.

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Efforts to Restore Monarch Butterflies’ Milkweed Habitats May Be Doing More Harm Than Good

KQED Science | November 19, 2014 | 5 Comments

Efforts to Restore Monarch Butterflies’ Milkweed Habitats May Be Doing More Harm Than Good

Migratory monarch butterfly populations have fallen into a tailspin in recent years. Scientists fear that in a classic case of good intentions gone awry, efforts to help the beleaguered butterflies may be inadvertently making matters worse by changing their behavior.

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Want to Go to Mars? A Cheaper Alternative Resides in Chile’s Atacama Desert

KQED Science | November 19, 2014 | 1 Comment

Want to Go to Mars? A Cheaper Alternative Resides in Chile’s Atacama Desert

If you want to go to Mars but can’t quite afford the hundreds of billions of dollars for a ticket, there is another solution: consider instead a trip to the Atacama Desert in Chile.

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What Gall! The Crazy Cribs of Parasitic Wasps

KQED Science | November 18, 2014 | 1 Comment

What Gall! The Crazy Cribs of Parasitic Wasps

Plenty of animals build their homes in oak trees. But some very teeny, tricky wasps make the tree do all the work. “What nerve!” you might say. What… gall! And you’d be right. The wasps are called gall-inducers. And each miniature mansion that the trees build for the wasps' larvae is weirder and more flamboyant than the next.

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Scientists Suspect a Virus is Causing Sea Star Die-Off

KQED Science | November 17, 2014 | 1 Comment

Scientists Suspect a Virus is Causing Sea Star Die-Off

But the virus isn't new to sea stars, so what triggered the current outbreak remains a mystery.

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Scientists Find Genes in Mice That May Lead to Future Ebola Treatments

KQED Science | November 17, 2014 | 0 Comments

Scientists Find Genes in Mice That May Lead to Future Ebola Treatments

Scientists have identified Ebola-resistant and Ebola-sensitive mouse strains. Not only will the sensitive mice be useful as a relatively quick way to test new Ebola treatments, but by comparing its genetics to those of the resistant strains, scientists may find new ways to treat Ebola.

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/video/diving-into-the-twilight-zone/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=diving-into-the-twilight-zone target=_blank >Diving Into the Twilight Zone</a>

QUEST | November 11, 2014

Diving Into the Twilight Zone

Through centuries of exploration, humans have climbed the highest peaks and hacked through the densest jungles. From pole to pole, there isn't a continent left unexplored, and very little land on earth that has not been set foot on by a human being. Yet only 10 percent of the world’s vast oceans have been truly explored. ...Read More

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Parched: California Wildlife Suffers in Drought

KQED Science | November 10, 2014 | 0 Comments

Parched: California Wildlife Suffers in Drought

Birds, salmon and snakes depend on marshes and rivers for survival and migration, and to propagate the species. But many wildlife species are unable to find the water they need as the drought shrinks rivers and dries up wetlands.

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Oldest Sequenced Genome From 45,000-Year-Old DNA

KQED Science | November 3, 2014 | 1 Comment

Oldest Sequenced Genome From 45,000-Year-Old DNA

In a technological tour de force, a group of scientists have managed to read most of the DNA from the thigh bone of a 45,000 year-old-man. They were able to estimate that humans and Neanderthals bred in a major way 50,000-60,000 years ago and to confirm that the human mutation rate is a bit slower than scientists previously thought.

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Why California’s Largest Estuary No Longer Works for Wildlife

KQED Science | October 30, 2014 | 4 Comments

Why California’s Largest Estuary No Longer Works for Wildlife

Startling maps in a new report on the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta show the dramatic loss of marshlands that once supported a vast array of wildlife.

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/video/on-gmo-labeling-oregon-and-colorado-learn-from-california-defeat/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=on-gmo-labeling-oregon-and-colorado-learn-from-california-defeat target=_blank >With GMO Labeling on the Ballot, Oregon and Colorado Learn From California Defeat</a>

QUEST | October 28, 2014

With GMO Labeling on the Ballot, Oregon and Colorado Learn From California Defeat

Voters in Oregon will head to the polls Nov. 4 to decide whether to require foods made with genetically engineered ingredients to be labeled. In doing so, they'll be voting on an initiative shaped in part by the experience of activists in California, who watched a similar measure fail ...Read More

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New Research Shows Targeted Antioxidants Help Mice Live Longer, Healthier Lives

KQED Science | October 21, 2014 | 0 Comments

New Research Shows Targeted Antioxidants Help Mice Live Longer, Healthier Lives

While many of the benefits of antioxidants are undoubtedly oversold, we do know that if given at high enough levels and targeted to the right place, antioxidants can help a mouse live 10-20% longer. If this holds up in people, that is equivalent to an extra 7-14 years for people here in the U.S.

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Pygmy Seahorses: Masters of Camouflage

KQED Science | October 21, 2014 | 1 Comment

Pygmy Seahorses: Masters of Camouflage

Tiny and delicate, pygmy seahorses survive by attaching to vibrant corals where they become nearly invisible to both predators and researchers. Now, biologists at the California Academy of Sciences have successfully bred them in captivity for the first time. Finally, they're able to study the seahorses' amazing act of camouflage up close.

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Bay Area Scientists Artfully Present Their Research in Oakland Exhibit

KQED Science | October 20, 2014 | 1 Comment

Bay Area Scientists Artfully Present Their Research in Oakland Exhibit

“Experimental Space” is the latest show at Oakland art gallery Aggregate Space, consisting of images and videos created by scientists in the course of their research.

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