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As Delta Smelt Nears Extinction, New Concerns Emerge Over Dredging

KQED Science | May 13, 2015 | 2 Comments

As Delta Smelt Nears Extinction, New Concerns Emerge Over Dredging

The tiny Delta smelt is famous for being a target in California's water wars, but it's dangerously close to extinction. That's bringing attention to anything that could harm the fish, including something rarely discussed: dredging Delta waterways for big cargo ships.

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Bird Watching “Big Day” Goes Global

KQED Science | May 8, 2015 | 0 Comments

Bird Watching “Big Day” Goes Global

Learn how amateur bird watchers are contributing to the knowledge of our planet's biodiversity with an online tool and a new, global effort.

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Fish Help Build Coral-Reef Islands

KQED Science | May 1, 2015 | 1 Comment

Fish Help Build Coral-Reef Islands

A research project in the Indian Ocean shows that coral-crunching fish are good not just for the coral reef habitat--they're actually crucial for maintaining dry land there.

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Environmentalists Urge Changes to Protect Whales From Crab Lines

KQED Science | April 29, 2015 | 0 Comments

Environmentalists Urge Changes to Protect Whales From Crab Lines

A rising number of whales are getting entangled off the coast of California in the lines fishermen use to pull up crab pots. Environmental groups are calling on state officials to protect the cetaceans.

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Why Poop-Eating Vampire Squid Make Patient Parents

KQED Science | April 28, 2015 | 0 Comments

Why Poop-Eating Vampire Squid Make Patient Parents

Squid and octopuses are famous for their "live fast, die young" strategy, but scientists have just discovered a striking exception: the bizarre species known as vampire squid.

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Western Bluebird Populations Expand in the Bay Area

KQED Science | April 24, 2015 | 2 Comments

Western Bluebird Populations Expand in the Bay Area

After their populations plunged in the mid-20th century, bluebirds have made a comeback with help from volunteers who make and monitor nest boxes.

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Alien Life Might Live in Our Own Solar System

KQED Science | April 13, 2015 | 0 Comments

Alien Life Might Live in Our Own Solar System

NASA's top scientist says she thinks evidence of life beyond Earth will turn up in the next couple of decades. Why so optimistic? Scientists have been discovering liquid water all around the solar system, and even though life on other planets might look different than it does here on Earth, scientists bet liquid water will be essential.

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River Otter Populations Are Expanding in the Bay Area

KQED Science | April 10, 2015 | 3 Comments

River Otter Populations Are Expanding in the Bay Area

River otters in the Bay Area finally have the first-ever census of their population published this year. After decades of no sign of the species, their numbers are expanding to nearly all nine counties in the Bay Area. Find out more from naturalist Sharol Nelson-Embry.

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Warm Winter Wrought Havoc for Coastal Wildlife

KQED Science | April 5, 2015 | 5 Comments

Warm Winter Wrought Havoc for Coastal Wildlife

Warm air and warm ocean waters together proved bad news this winter for wildlife on the Farallon Islands and along the nothern California coast.

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<a href=http://ww2.kqed.org/futureofyou/2015/04/03/ancestry-uses-a-drop-of-saliva-to-find-your-relatives-from-centuries-ago/ target=_blank >Ancestry Uses a Drop of Saliva to Find Your Relatives From Centuries Ago</a>

KQED Science | April 3, 2015

Ancestry Uses a Drop of Saliva to Find Your Relatives From Centuries Ago

This week Ancestry.com released a product that it claims can provide glimpses into the lives of your distant descendants.

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What Happens When You Put a Hummingbird in a Wind Tunnel?

KQED Science | March 31, 2015 | 3 Comments

What Happens When You Put a Hummingbird in a Wind Tunnel?

Scientists use a high-speed camera to film hummingbirds' aerial acrobatics at 1000 frames per second. They see, frame by frame, how neither wind nor rain stop these tiniest of birds from fueling up.

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Drought Hasn’t Dampened Gorgeous Bay Area Wildflowers Display

KQED Science | March 27, 2015 | 3 Comments

Drought Hasn’t Dampened Gorgeous Bay Area Wildflowers Display

The drought hasn't held back the wildflowers this year. See what's blooming in naturalist Sharol Nelson-Embrys blog.

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Researchers at SLAC Study Promising Alternative to Morphine

KQED Science | March 27, 2015 | 3 Comments

Researchers at SLAC Study Promising Alternative to Morphine

Researchers are now studying a new kind of pain reliever with less side effects than morphine, using the Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

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Newt Sex: Buff Males! Writhing Females! Cannibalism!

KQED Science | March 17, 2015 | 6 Comments

Newt Sex: Buff Males! Writhing Females! Cannibalism!

Every winter, California newts leave the safety of their forest burrows and travel as far as three miles to mate in the pond where they were born. Their mating ritual is a raucous affair that involves bulked-up males, writhing females and a little cannibalism.

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Bee Decline Linked to a Combination of Stressors

KQED Science | March 16, 2015 | 0 Comments

Bee Decline Linked to a Combination of Stressors

There's plenty you can do, however, to help honeybees, from observations you can make when watching pollinators to what you plant in your garden.

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Powerful Genetic Test Prevents Paternity Mix-Up

KQED Science | March 9, 2015 | 5 Comments

Powerful Genetic Test Prevents Paternity Mix-Up

A couple who used a fertility clinic to conceive was ready to sue when the child’s blood type didn’t match up with mom and dad’s. Obviously the clinic had used the wrong sperm or made some other awful mistake. Except in this case they probably hadn’t. The couple, whose case I worked on, gave me […]

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Vivid New Seadragon Found Hiding in a Museum

KQED Science | March 3, 2015 | 0 Comments

Vivid New Seadragon Found Hiding in a Museum

Science has just introduced the first new seadragon species in 150 years, and the first new ichthyosaur species in 130 years. The coincidence illustrates the value of museum collections.

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From Drifter to Dynamo: The Story of Plankton

KQED Science | March 3, 2015 | 0 Comments

From Drifter to Dynamo: The Story of Plankton

Most plankton are tiny drifters, wandering in a vast ocean. But where wind and currents converge they become part of a grander story… an explosion of vitality that affects all life on Earth, including our own.

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Strongest Natural Material in the World Discovered: Limpet Teeth

KQED Science | February 27, 2015 | 0 Comments

Strongest Natural Material in the World Discovered: Limpet Teeth

The strongest natural material in the world has just been discovered: limpet teeth. Learn more about how this discovery could improve our future technology and innovations through biomimicry.

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Scientists Tackle a Dual Threat: More Acid, Less Oxygen in the Ocean

KQED Science | February 26, 2015 | 0 Comments

Scientists Tackle a Dual Threat: More Acid, Less Oxygen in the Ocean

Marine scientists from up and down the West Coast say it's a one-two punch to the Pacific food web.

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