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Strongest Natural Material in the World Discovered: Limpet Teeth

KQED Science | February 27, 2015 | 0 Comments

Strongest Natural Material in the World Discovered: Limpet Teeth

The strongest natural material in the world has just been discovered: limpet teeth. Learn more about how this discovery could improve our future technology and innovations through biomimicry.

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Scientists Tackle a Dual Threat: More Acid, Less Oxygen in the Ocean

KQED Science | February 26, 2015 | 0 Comments

Scientists Tackle a Dual Threat: More Acid, Less Oxygen in the Ocean

Marine scientists from up and down the West Coast say it's a one-two punch to the Pacific food web.

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Scientists Create the Most Precise 3D Map of the Human Genome Yet

KQED Science | February 23, 2015 | 0 Comments

Scientists Create the Most Precise 3D Map of the Human Genome Yet

Until recently scientists have not been able to figure out the information coded in the folding of our DNA in the nucleus. A new map now makes this task simpler. This kind of map will not only tell us how the instructions in our DNA lead to making each one of us, but it may also provide new ways to understand and even treat diseases like cancer.

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Banana Slugs: Secret of the Slime

KQED Science | February 17, 2015 | 1 Comment

Banana Slugs: Secret of the Slime

Beneath the towering redwoods lives one of the most peculiar creatures in California: the banana slug. They're coated with a liquid crystal ooze that solves many problems slugs face in the forest -- and maybe some of our own.

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Elephant Seals Battle for Love With Mating Songs and Bravado

KQED Science | February 9, 2015 | 0 Comments

Elephant Seals Battle for Love With Mating Songs and Bravado

They may sound like faulty plumbing, but male northern elephant seals have a unique communication system that's all about reputation.

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In the Race for Life, Which Human Embryos Make It?

KQED Science | February 3, 2015 | 0 Comments

In the Race for Life, Which Human Embryos Make It?

Every one of us started out as an embryo, but only a few early embryos – about one in three – grow into a baby. Researchers are unlocking the mysteries of our embryonic clock and helping patients who are struggling to get pregnant.

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Building a Better Bionic Arm by Teaching the Brain a New Signal

KQED Science | February 2, 2015 | 2 Comments

Building a Better Bionic Arm by Teaching the Brain a New Signal

Even the best prosthetics today lack a natural sense that tells the brain where the body is in space. That makes it hard to comb the back of your hair, for example, or thread a belt.

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Genetically Speaking, Americans Really Are a Melting Pot of Diversity

KQED Science | January 26, 2015 | 1 Comment

Genetically Speaking, Americans Really Are a Melting Pot of Diversity

A new study confirms that at the DNA level, people in the U.S. are more similar than many might think. People who self identify as African-American, Latino or European-American very often have traces of one or both of the other ancestries in their DNA.

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How Electric Light Changed the Night

KQED Science | January 20, 2015 | 4 Comments

How Electric Light Changed the Night

Artificial light makes the modern world possible. But not all kinds of light are good for us. Electric light has fundamentally altered our lives, our bodies and the very nature of our sleep.

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Tiny Parasite Threatens Native Plants

KQED Science | January 12, 2015 | 6 Comments

Tiny Parasite Threatens Native Plants

A microscopic pathogen got into the roots of some native plants at a restoration project in Alameda County, despite massive efforts to prevent it. Now officials are hoping to stop this microbe before it spreads.

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Scientists Used Modern DNA to Reconstruct Part of a 19th-Century Man’s Genome

KQED Science | January 12, 2015 | 0 Comments

Scientists Used Modern DNA to Reconstruct Part of a 19th-Century Man’s Genome

Until recently, you pretty much had to rely on family stories that were passed down through the generations to learn about your ancestors. But that is now set to change. With a little luck, a whole lot of science and genealogy, you may be able to use passed down DNA instead of stories to learn a bit about that great-great-great-grandfather.

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The Fantastic Fur of Sea Otters

KQED Science | January 6, 2015 | 1 Comment

The Fantastic Fur of Sea Otters

Sea otters aren’t just cute -- they’re a vivid example of life on the edge. Unlike whales and other ocean mammals, sea otters have no blubber. Yet they're still able to keep warm in the frigid Pacific waters. The secret to their survival? A fur coat like no other.

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How Science Can Help Prevent a (Bad) Hangover

KQED Science | December 29, 2014 | 4 Comments

How Science Can Help Prevent a (Bad) Hangover

In the annals of medical research, you won’t find many studies on the common hangover. But one intrepid Bay Area scientist has taken on the topic -- and even has an inexpensive remedy you probably haven't heard about.

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Bird Biology Knowledge Expands with the Sequencing of 48 Genomes

KQED Science | December 29, 2014 | 0 Comments

Bird Biology Knowledge Expands with the Sequencing of 48 Genomes

In a stunning feat of scientific prowess, a large group of scientists has completely sequenced the genomes of 48 different bird species. But as sequencing gets easier, managing all of that data is turning out to be the real challenge.

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Stanford Identifies Drug That May Improve Cardiac Stents

KQED Science | December 22, 2014 | 0 Comments

Stanford Identifies Drug That May Improve Cardiac Stents

Stanford researchers believe they’ve found a drug for cardiac stents that can more effectively prevent complications, because the drug targets the actual cause of stent disease.

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UC Berkeley Study Says Migratory Birds Use Infrasound to Avoid Storms

KQED Science | December 19, 2014 | 0 Comments

UC Berkeley Study Says Migratory Birds Use Infrasound to Avoid Storms

It’s well-known that daylight length is an important migratory trigger, but a new study from UC Berkeley finds birds use infrasound, or tones lower than the normal range of human hearing, to flee bad weather.

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Spineless: New Photography Collection Celebrates Our Undersea Cousins

KQED Science | December 16, 2014 | 1 Comment

Spineless: New Photography Collection Celebrates Our Undersea Cousins

A new book about marine invertebrates celebrates the sumptuous beauty of our lesser-known cousins.

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What Gives the Morpho Butterfly Its Magnificent Blue?

KQED Science | December 16, 2014 | 3 Comments

What Gives the Morpho Butterfly Its Magnificent Blue?

What does it mean to be blue? The wings of a Morpho butterfly are some of the most brilliant structures in nature, and yet they contain no blue pigment -- they harness the physics of light at the nanoscale.

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Getting Genetic-Based Health Data Just Got Easier in Canada and the U.K.

KQED Science | December 15, 2014 | 0 Comments

Getting Genetic-Based Health Data Just Got Easier in Canada and the U.K.

Here in the U.S., if you want to get health information from your direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic test, you need to use an online resource like Promethease. The same is no longer true in Canada and the U.K.

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Bay Area Rainfall Ushers in Mating Season for Amorous Amphibians

KQED Science | December 5, 2014 | 0 Comments

Bay Area Rainfall Ushers in Mating Season for Amorous Amphibians

Amphibians face tough times as nearly one-third of the species has already lost worldwide. Learn about our local amphibians and what the East Bay Regional Parks District is doing to protect them.

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