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San Francisco Wants to Know: Is Your Living Room Window Killing Migratory Birds?

KQED Science | August 22, 2014 | 0 Comments

San Francisco Wants to Know: Is Your Living Room Window Killing Migratory Birds?

Between 100 million and one billion birds die each year from colliding with glass windows of commercial or residential buildings. San Francisco is launching a program to track the damage caused by windows in homes.

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A Family of Bald Eagles Grows in Castro Valley

KQED Science | August 15, 2014 | 0 Comments

A Family of Bald Eagles Grows in Castro Valley

Iconic bald eagles are capturing our hearts through nest webcams that showcase their family dramas online. Learn more about a local eagle family that fledged not one, but two young eagles this year at Lake Chabot Regional Park.

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Some of Us May Have a Genetic Predisposition to Disliking Exercise

KQED Science | August 11, 2014 | 0 Comments

Some of Us May Have a Genetic Predisposition to Disliking Exercise

About 90% of us over the age of 12 fail to get as much exercise as we should. This is almost certainly not because we don’t believe in those benefits. Instead, it looks like at least part of the reason may be that some of us are genetically programmed to hate exercise.

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Stanford Scientists Use Fruit Flies to Study Diabetes

KQED Science | August 7, 2014 | 2 Comments

Stanford Scientists Use Fruit Flies to Study Diabetes

Stanford researchers have developed a new way to use fruit flies to sort through the complicated genetics of Type 2 diabetes.

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There’s a New Bird Species in California, Sort Of

KQED Science | August 4, 2014 | 3 Comments

There’s a New Bird Species in California, Sort Of

When is a clapper rail not a clapper rail? Answer: when it's in California, as it turns out.

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What Is Schizophrenia? Scientists Call for New Thinking

KQED Science | August 4, 2014 | 6 Comments

What Is Schizophrenia? Scientists Call for New Thinking

For two generations, psychiatrists have treated schizophrenia by medicating its most obvious symptoms: delusions and hallucinations. Were they wrong?

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A Tale of Two Tern Towns in the Bay Area

KQED Science | August 1, 2014 | 0 Comments

A Tale of Two Tern Towns in the Bay Area

The Bay Area hosts two large breeding colonies of endangered California least terns. Find out more about these birds and the East Bay Regional Park District's efforts to manage their populations.

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Deep-Sea Octopus is Mother of the Year

KQED Science | July 30, 2014 | 0 Comments

Deep-Sea Octopus is Mother of the Year

Researchers from the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute discovered a deep-sea octopus that tends its eggs for 53 months, longer than any known animal.

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Genetically Engineering Wild Populations Could Be Just Around the Corner

KQED Science | July 28, 2014 | 0 Comments

Genetically Engineering Wild Populations Could Be Just Around the Corner

We might be able to use selfish genes to cause the population of mosquitoes that carry malaria to crash. Is genetically manipulating these insects out in the wild worth preventing hundreds of millions of people from getting malaria?

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A Quest for Vegan Cheese That Actually Tastes Like Cheese

KQED Science | July 26, 2014 | 1 Comment

A Quest for Vegan Cheese That Actually Tastes Like Cheese

A team of Bay Area scientists is biohacking baker's yeast, in an effort to produce proteins that are just like milk proteins, only they're aren't from milk.

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Present-Day Tibetans Inherited Genetic Gifts from Paleolithic-Era Ancestors

KQED Science | July 14, 2014 | 0 Comments

Present-Day Tibetans Inherited Genetic Gifts from Paleolithic-Era Ancestors

The world had been awash in news about how we can see the evidence in our DNA of ancient humans mating with Neanderthals and their close relatives, the Denisovans. Now in a new study out in the journal Nature, a group of researchers has found the strongest evidence to date that this mating mattered.

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Inspectors at Lake Tahoe Intercept Invasive Mussels

KQED Science | July 11, 2014 | 1 Comment

Inspectors at Lake Tahoe Intercept Invasive Mussels

Mandatory boat inspections stop invasive species from endangering Lake Tahoe’s pristine ecosystem.

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Communicating Science Through an Artistic Lens at Stanford

KQED Science | July 10, 2014 | 0 Comments

Communicating Science Through an Artistic Lens at Stanford

Stanford scientist Sue McConnell will receive $1 million over the next five years to sustain a program that teaches biology seniors to communicate science to the public through art.

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With DARPA Support, Lawrence Lab Seeks to Develop Brain Implant to Treat Memory Loss

KQED Science | July 9, 2014 | 1 Comment

With DARPA Support, Lawrence Lab Seeks to Develop Brain Implant to Treat Memory Loss

Misplace your car keys? Forget to buy milk at the store? For those coping with a memory-impairing disease or injury, memory loss can be debilitating. New therapeutic brain implants could help patients overcome memory deficits.

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New Way to Save Endangered Species: Make Predators Puke

KQED Science | July 4, 2014 | 0 Comments

New Way to Save Endangered Species: Make Predators Puke

Marbled murrelets are rare seabirds that lay just one egg a year, and those eggs are a favorite food item for another bird: Steller’s jays. Scientists are hoping to trick the jays into avoiding the murrelet eggs using decoy eggs with a rude surprise inside.

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Water Snakes Invading California Threaten Native Species

KQED Science | June 30, 2014 | 0 Comments

Water Snakes Invading California Threaten Native Species

Biologists at UC Davis are growing concerned about the presence of non-native aquatic snakes in California’s waterways.

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You Can Transform Your Genetic Ancestry Data Into Health Info, But Your Results May Vary

KQED Science | June 30, 2014 | 0 Comments

You Can Transform Your Genetic Ancestry Data Into Health Info, But Your Results May Vary

An online service called Promethease allows you to convert your genetic ancestry data into health data. If you do, keep in mind that you may miss key health data because your ancestry test might not have been designed to find important health markers.

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2014/06/26/139312/a_shocking_fish_tale_surprises_evolutionary_biologists?source=npr&category=science target=_blank >A Shocking Fish Tale Surprises Evolutionary Biologists</a>

KQED News | June 26, 2014

A Shocking Fish Tale Surprises Evolutionary Biologists

...Read More

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It’s a Busy Time for Bird Rescue

KQED Science | June 23, 2014 | 0 Comments

It’s a Busy Time for Bird Rescue

International Bird Rescue is an aquatic bird rehabilitation center that treats more than 2,500 birds each year.

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A ‘Squid Bloom’ in Monterey Bay Is Good News for Local Fishermen

KQED Science | June 19, 2014 | 0 Comments

A ‘Squid Bloom’ in Monterey Bay Is Good News for Local Fishermen

Squid fishermen in and around Monterey Bay are experiencing early success this season with California market squid, which may be a result of a couple happy accidents.

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