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En Route to Jupiter, Juno Sends First-Ever Video of Earth and Moon

KQED Science | December 11, 2013 | 0 Comments

En Route to Jupiter, Juno Sends First-Ever Video of Earth and Moon

In San Francisco this week, NASA scientists presented rare video footage of the Earth and moon, plus a first for citizen space science.

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Cassini or Curiosity: Budget Cuts Could Force NASA to Make A Tough Choice

KQED Science | November 29, 2013 | 3 Comments

Cassini or Curiosity: Budget Cuts Could Force NASA to Make A Tough Choice

If you had to make a choice to shut down either the Mars rover Curiosity or that explorer of the Saturn system Cassini, would you deliver a pink slip to the young, eager, energetic newbie or force an early retirement on a veteran explorer who has delivered volumes of knowledge?

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Meet ISON, the “Comet of the Century” That, Sadly, Wasn’t

KQED Science | November 29, 2013 | 0 Comments

Meet ISON, the “Comet of the Century” That, Sadly, Wasn’t

Comet ISON may not have survived its close brush with the Sun, but astronomers are still going to "study the heck out of it," says Foothill College astronomy professor Andrew Fraknoi.

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Silicon Valley VC’s Take on Successful Space Startups

KQED Science | November 20, 2013 | 0 Comments

Silicon Valley VC’s Take on Successful Space Startups

Steve Jurvetson is a leading Silicon Valley venture capitalist and a board member of rocket maker and launch services company, SpaceX. He shares what it takes to launch a successful start-up in the high-stakes space industry.

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Silicon Valley Goes to Space

KQED Science | November 18, 2013 | 8 Comments

Silicon Valley Goes to Space

Commercial space ventures are taking off and opening up space like never before. With its culture of risk and game-changing startups, Silicon Valley is playing a starring role in many of these new space companies. But risks and costs emerge with the increasing privatization of space.

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NASA Launches its New Mars Mission

KQED Science | November 18, 2013 | 0 Comments

NASA Launches its New Mars Mission

NASA's newest Mars probe, MAVEN is now shooting through the solar system. A mere 440 million miles stand between the robotic explorer and its final destination: the Martian atmosphere.

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Comet ISON’s Solar-Coaster Ride is Heating Up

KQED Science | November 15, 2013 | 1 Comment

Comet ISON’s Solar-Coaster Ride is Heating Up

There's been a great deal of anticipation surrounding Comet ISON—and a great deal of debate about whether it will become a Comet of the Century, or fizzle out like so many other comets of the century have in the past. ISON is now visible in binoculars, which may bode well for a good sky show in the coming weeks.

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Why Astronauts and Telecommunications Companies Fear the ‘Solar Maximum’

KQED Science | November 12, 2013 | 0 Comments

Why Astronauts and Telecommunications Companies Fear the ‘Solar Maximum’

Every 11 years, the magnetic field of the sun changes its polarity (in fact, this may already be happening) sending a ripple of changing current out way past Pluto, to the outer reaches of the heliosphere. This solar "flip" is happening now.

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Meteor Crashed with the Force of 600,000 Tons of TNT, Say Scientists (And It’ll Happen Again)

KQED Science | November 6, 2013 | 0 Comments

Meteor Crashed with the Force of 600,000 Tons of TNT, Say Scientists (And It’ll Happen Again)

The Chelyabinsk meteor was a 65-foot hunk of space rock that entered the Earth's atmosphere at about 12 miles per second before exploding with a force equal to 600,000 tons of TNT, enough to level buildings and send 1,200 people to local hospitals.

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Kepler Team: Universe “Crowded” with Earth-Like Planets

KQED Science | November 4, 2013 | 0 Comments

Kepler Team: Universe “Crowded” with Earth-Like Planets

A NASA scientist sums it up: “If we ever get star travel, we’ll probably see a lot of traffic jams.”

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Juno Aims to Pierce the Veil of Jupiter’s Cloud-Shrouded Mystery

KQED Science | November 1, 2013 | 0 Comments

Juno Aims to Pierce the Veil of Jupiter’s Cloud-Shrouded Mystery

Over centuries of observing the planet Jupiter, we have but scratched the surface of the deep mysteries held secret beneath its thick clouds. Now NASA's Juno probe, currently en route to the king of planets, is preparing to pierce the veil of Jupiter's mystery and give us a peek inside.

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Comet ISON: Celestial Popcorn That’s Ready to Pop?

KQED Science | October 18, 2013 | 0 Comments

Comet ISON: Celestial Popcorn That’s Ready to Pop?

Maybe a week before it passes closest to the sun, the dark side of Comet ISON is expected to begin turning into the sunlight. The sudden exposure to the intense radiation could cause a strong outburst of gases into the coma--like a celestial popcorn kernel suddenly bursting.

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NASA’s ‘Mohawk Guy’ on the Search for Signs of Life on Mars

KQED Science | October 15, 2013 | 0 Comments

NASA’s ‘Mohawk Guy’ on the Search for Signs of Life on Mars

NASA's "Engineer with a Mohawk" has become a pop culture phenom (62,000 Twitter followers isn't too shabby). But under that comb beats the heart of a true explorer, as we found when he dropped by for a visit.

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NASA Robots Are Sniffing For Clues on Mars and Titan

KQED Science | October 4, 2013 | 0 Comments

NASA Robots Are Sniffing For Clues on Mars and Titan

NASA's Curiosity rover on Mars has raised some eyebrows by something it has not detected: methane. And, much farther out, the Cassini spacecraft has made a positive detection of plastic in the atmosphere of Saturn's moon Titan.

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Peeling Away the Moon’s Mysteries

KQED Science | September 23, 2013 | 1 Comment

Peeling Away the Moon’s Mysteries

The moon often seems like an ancient relic of space exploration, that dusty, dry, airless ball of rock and soil that we visited decades ago and have since left alone—possibly because we found nothing there but dust, rock, and soil? Not so fast. Exploration in the past few years has revealed aspects of the moon that contradict what we were taught in school.

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Comet ISON: Comet of the Century or Fanciful Fluff?

KQED Science | September 6, 2013 | 3 Comments

Comet ISON: Comet of the Century or Fanciful Fluff?

A comet named ISON has been hailed as a possible "comet of the century." But scientists aren't sure yet if it will survive a hairpin turn around the sun.

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New NASA Moon Mission Aims to Solve a 40-Year-Old Mystery

KQED Science | September 3, 2013 | 0 Comments

New NASA Moon Mission Aims to Solve a 40-Year-Old Mystery

In 1972, an Apollo 17 astronaut glimpsed a strange phenomenon of streaming light from the window of the command module as it orbited the dark side of the moon. Now, a new NASA mission aims to discover what caused that phenomenon, and whether it could be a hazard for future lunar landings.

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Generations of Exploration: From Hubble to the James Webb Space Telescope

KQED Science | August 23, 2013 | 0 Comments

Generations of Exploration: From Hubble to the James Webb Space Telescope

If you think the list of achievements of NASA's Hubble Space Telescope is impressive, consider that its successor, the James Webb Space Telescope, will sport a mirror 21 feet across, with more than 20 times the light-collecting capability of its predecessor!

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Rare Meteorite Lands Permanently at UC Davis

KQED Science | August 21, 2013 | 0 Comments

Rare Meteorite Lands Permanently at UC Davis

UC Davis is acquiring a chunk of meteorite that landed in Northern California last year. The meteorite's age makes it rare and valuable. It contains dust from ancient stars that exploded, the same stuff that eventually formed our solar system.

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The Perseids Are Coming! Find Out When And Where To View Them

KQED Science | August 9, 2013 | 1 Comment

The Perseids Are Coming! Find Out When And Where To View Them

It's time to enjoy the annual Perseid meteors, the Old Faithful of meteor showers that lights up the August night and thoroughly delights those sleepy souls willing to stay up past midnight for one of nature's original fireworks shows.

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