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Jennifer Huber

Jennifer Huber is a medical imaging scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory with more than 20 years of experience in academic science writing. She received her Ph.D. in Physics from the University of California Santa Barbara. She is also a freelance science writer, editor and blogger, as well as a science-writing instructor for the University of California Berkeley Extension. Jennifer has lived in the San Francisco Bay Area most of her life and she frequently enjoys the eclectic cultural, culinary and outdoor activities available in the area.

Read her previous contributions to QUEST, a project dedicated to exploring the Science of Sustainability.

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Jennifer Huber's Latest Posts

Researchers Have Vision-Correcting Computer Screens in Their Sights

KQED Science | August 30, 2014 | 0 Comments

Researchers Have Vision-Correcting Computer Screens in Their Sights

What if everyone could clearly see their phone and computer screens without wearing eyeglasses or contact lenses? Researchers have developed new vision-correcting display technology that could help make this a reality.

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New UC Berkeley Study Shows Oxytocin May Help Rejuvenate Aging Muscles

KQED Science | July 21, 2014 | 0 Comments

New UC Berkeley Study Shows Oxytocin May Help Rejuvenate Aging Muscles

UC Berkeley researchers have discovered that administering oxytocin may help maintain healthy muscles during aging.

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Two Common Pathogens Can Survive for Days on Surfaces in Airplanes

KQED Science | June 4, 2014 | 0 Comments

Two Common Pathogens Can Survive for Days on Surfaces in Airplanes

Disease-causing pathogens, like MRSA and E. coli bacteria, can linger for days on surfaces in airplane cabins, according to new research results from Auburn University.

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How Damaged is Your DNA? A New Startup Wants to Know

KQED Science | March 17, 2014 | 3 Comments

How Damaged is Your DNA? A New Startup Wants to Know

If your annual checkup included a simple blood test to determine how much DNA damage you have in your body, you may be able to optimize your long-term health by taking action to minimize DNA damage due to your diet, exercise and environment. A startup company called Exogen Biotechnology wants to provide the public with a way to monitor their DNA health.

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New Research Shows Diet Drinks May Backfire for Weight Loss

KQED Science | February 24, 2014 | 0 Comments

New Research Shows Diet Drinks May Backfire for Weight Loss

Many overweight people switch to diet drinks to reduce their calorie intake. Unfortunately, they make up the calories by eating significantly more food during meals and snacks.

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New Imaging Method May Help Detect Heart Attack Risk in the Future

KQED Science | January 21, 2014 | 0 Comments

New Imaging Method May Help Detect Heart Attack Risk in the Future

A non-invasive imaging method could help identify and localize artery-clogging plaques that are likely to cause a heart attack. If future studies confirm the initial results, this technique has the potential to fundamentally alter the way we treat heart disease.

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Garcinia Cambogia: The Fastest Fat-Buster or Another Fad Diet?

KQED Science | December 2, 2013 | 0 Comments

Garcinia Cambogia: The Fastest Fat-Buster or Another Fad Diet?

Garcinia cambogia has been called the ”newest, fastest fat-buster” and a “magic ingredient that lets you lose weight without diet or exercise,” but scientific research questions its effectiveness.

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Great American Smokeout: Time to Quit

KQED Science | November 18, 2013 | 3 Comments

Great American Smokeout: Time to Quit

There are many good reasons to quit smoking, including better health and saving money. There is also a good time to quit: this Thursday during the Great American Smokeout.

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The Controversy Over Calcium Supplements

KQED Science | November 5, 2013 | 4 Comments

The Controversy Over Calcium Supplements

To help prevent osteoporosis, the use of calcium supplements is very common. But recent research studies question whether these calcium supplements are effective or safe.

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Infections During Pregnancy May Increase Autism Risk

KQED Science | October 14, 2013 | 0 Comments

Infections During Pregnancy May Increase Autism Risk

Research at UC Davis identifies a new biological mechanism that links maternal infections during pregnancy to increased risk of having a child with a neurodevelopmental disorder like autism.

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New Portable Device Rapidly Measures Radiation Exposure

KQED Science | September 3, 2013 | 0 Comments

New Portable Device Rapidly Measures Radiation Exposure

Local scientists have developed a small, portable device that can quickly test a person’s level of radiation exposure and could be used for victims in a large-scale radiological accident or terrorist attack.

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Earworms: Intrusive Songs That Stick in Your Brain

KQED Science | June 24, 2013 | 0 Comments

Earworms: Intrusive Songs That Stick in Your Brain

Having a song stuck in your head is a common experience. Researchers from Western Washington University have investigated many common beliefs about these earworm phenomena. They have also determined the best way to stop an earworm.

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L-carnitine: Heart Disease’s Chemical Culprit?

KQED Science | May 23, 2013 | 1 Comment

L-carnitine: Heart Disease’s Chemical Culprit?

Eating a lot of red meat is known to contribute to heart disease, presumably due to the large amount of saturated fats and cholesterol in the meat. Or that’s what we used to think. New research indicates the real culprit may be a chemical in the red meat called L-carnitine.

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