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Women Getting Science Ph.D.s Still Face Gender Barriers

KQED Science | May 18, 2015 | 1 Comment

Women Getting Science Ph.D.s Still Face Gender Barriers

Women in science say the problem doesn't stem from women making choices between career and family -- it's plain, old-fashioned sex discrimination.

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2015/05/07/162371/california_prepares_for_difficult_fire_season_amid_drought?source=npr&category=science target=_blank >California Prepares For Difficult Fire Season Amid Drought</a>

KQED News | May 7, 2015

California Prepares For Difficult Fire Season Amid Drought

Fires are more dangerous when vegetation is dry, and water sources may be more difficult to find.

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‘Aggressive’ New Drought Rules for California: Now Comes the Hard Part

KQED Science | May 6, 2015 | 6 Comments

‘Aggressive’ New Drought Rules for California: Now Comes the Hard Part

State officials officially hand the ball to local water agencies to squeeze 25 percent more water savings out of their customers. And ultimately, it is up to those customers to respond -- or not.

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State Passes Historic Water Conservation Rules

KQED Science | May 4, 2015 | 5 Comments

State Passes Historic Water Conservation Rules

The state-mandated water conservation "tiers" assigned to local water agencies don't tell the whole story. Some cities are already there, some have a lot more work to do.

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Governor Brown’s New Climate Offensive in Five Jerryesque Quotes

KQED Science | April 30, 2015 | 1 Comment

Governor Brown’s New Climate Offensive in Five Jerryesque Quotes

In promoting his new greenhouse gas reduction targets, the governor invokes World War II, climate-change deniers in Washington, and the recycled toilet water in our future.

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Amid California’s Drought, Should Cemeteries Stay Green?

KQED Science | April 27, 2015 | 1 Comment

Amid California’s Drought, Should Cemeteries Stay Green?

New drought restrictions are prompting cemetery managers to look at the water they use to keep lawns green. Some worry that for family members who visit this summer, parched grass might feel like insult on top of loss.

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The Bay Area: Ground Zero for Earth Day?

KQED Science | April 22, 2015 | 0 Comments

The Bay Area: Ground Zero for Earth Day?

The first Earth Day started a movement, rocked the government and created a generation of environmental leaders. In the Bay Area, it injected new energy into an environmental tradition that began with John Muir.

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When City Codes Clash With State Water Rules, Confusion Reigns

KQED Science | April 22, 2015 | 4 Comments

When City Codes Clash With State Water Rules, Confusion Reigns

Esthetics and water conservation clash as California cities find their own laws at odds with the governor's water reduction mandates.

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Celebrate Earth Day at John Muir Family Home

KQED Science | April 16, 2015 | 2 Comments

Celebrate Earth Day at John Muir Family Home

The Muir home in Martinez is a National Historic Site, and there will be live music, free activities, and a silent auction Saturday, April 18. You can also tour the home and walk the famous orchards.

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Alien Life Might Live in Our Own Solar System

KQED Science | April 13, 2015 | 0 Comments

Alien Life Might Live in Our Own Solar System

NASA's top scientist says she thinks evidence of life beyond Earth will turn up in the next couple of decades. Why so optimistic? Scientists have been discovering liquid water all around the solar system, and even though life on other planets might look different than it does here on Earth, scientists bet liquid water will be essential.

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The Next Crime Wave in Farm Country: Stealing Water

KQED Science | April 9, 2015

The Next Crime Wave in Farm Country: Stealing Water

Madera County's DA tries to get out in front of an expected wave of water-related thefts.

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What Happens When You Put a Hummingbird in a Wind Tunnel?

KQED Science | March 31, 2015 | 3 Comments

What Happens When You Put a Hummingbird in a Wind Tunnel?

Scientists use a high-speed camera to film hummingbirds' aerial acrobatics at 1000 frames per second. They see, frame by frame, how neither wind nor rain stop these tiniest of birds from fueling up.

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Why Isn’t Desalination the Answer to All California’s Water Problems?

KQED Science | March 30, 2015 | 178 Comments

Why Isn’t Desalination the Answer to All California’s Water Problems?

After four years of nowhere near enough rain, Californians are wondering where else to look for water, and many are talking about the ocean -- desalination. The problem is, it’s really expensive to turn salt water into drinking water. And it’s hard to do it in a way that’s friendly to sea life. But a group of mayors around Monterey Bay say they don't have any other options.

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Newt Sex: Buff Males! Writhing Females! Cannibalism!

KQED Science | March 17, 2015 | 6 Comments

Newt Sex: Buff Males! Writhing Females! Cannibalism!

Every winter, California newts leave the safety of their forest burrows and travel as far as three miles to mate in the pond where they were born. Their mating ritual is a raucous affair that involves bulked-up males, writhing females and a little cannibalism.

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Ancient Sinkhole Could Presage Mega-Tsunami for Hawaii

KQED Science | March 9, 2015 | 0 Comments

Ancient Sinkhole Could Presage Mega-Tsunami for Hawaii

There's buried treasure here for tsunami hunters, but scarce funding may mean Hawaii remains vulnerable.

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From Drifter to Dynamo: The Story of Plankton

KQED Science | March 3, 2015 | 0 Comments

From Drifter to Dynamo: The Story of Plankton

Most plankton are tiny drifters, wandering in a vast ocean. But where wind and currents converge they become part of a grander story… an explosion of vitality that affects all life on Earth, including our own.

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A Visit to Apple’s Secret New Headquarters

KQED Science | February 23, 2015 | 3 Comments

A Visit to Apple’s Secret New Headquarters

From the dust of the former Hewlett Packard campus in Cupertino, a glass and concrete ring is taking shape. Apple is building a new headquarters, and it's going to be bigger than the Pentagon. KQED got a tour and a look at the campus' green features.

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Banana Slugs: Secret of the Slime

KQED Science | February 17, 2015 | 1 Comment

Banana Slugs: Secret of the Slime

Beneath the towering redwoods lives one of the most peculiar creatures in California: the banana slug. They're coated with a liquid crystal ooze that solves many problems slugs face in the forest -- and maybe some of our own.

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Does California Need More National Monuments?

KQED Science | February 16, 2015 | 0 Comments

Does California Need More National Monuments?

Despite initial objections, most national monuments have withstood the test of time. We get some perspective from a leading authority on public lands law.

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In the Race for Life, Which Human Embryos Make It?

KQED Science | February 3, 2015 | 0 Comments

In the Race for Life, Which Human Embryos Make It?

Every one of us started out as an embryo, but only a few early embryos – about one in three – grow into a baby. Researchers are unlocking the mysteries of our embryonic clock and helping patients who are struggling to get pregnant.

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