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Bay Area Science Festival Kicks Off This Thursday, October 23

KQED Science | October 23, 2014 | 0 Comments

Bay Area Science Festival Kicks Off This Thursday, October 23

The Bay Area Science Festival features events like a bike ride through wetland and a tour of a UPS facility. It begins Thursday, October 23, and will host 56 events over ten days.

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As More Crude Oil Rolls In, a Push for Better Track Inspection

KQED Science | October 22, 2014 | 1 Comment

As More Crude Oil Rolls In, a Push for Better Track Inspection

In response to concerns about the risks of crude by rail, Union Pacific has begun to boost its rail inspection program by dispatching vehicles with lasers that can find tiny track imperfections.

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Pygmy Seahorses: Masters of Camouflage

KQED Science | October 21, 2014 | 1 Comment

Pygmy Seahorses: Masters of Camouflage

Tiny and delicate, pygmy seahorses survive by attaching to vibrant corals where they become nearly invisible to both predators and researchers. Now, biologists at the California Academy of Sciences have successfully bred them in captivity for the first time. Finally, they're able to study the seahorses' amazing act of camouflage up close.

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Drought-Stressed Crops May Be Better For You

KQED Science | October 20, 2014 | 1 Comment

Drought-Stressed Crops May Be Better For You

Scientists in California's Central Valley are testing the nutrient content of fruits grown with less-than-normal amounts of water. And the findings so far are raising a question: will consumers buy fruits that are just as nutritional, or sometimes higher in antioxidants, if they aren't as pretty?

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Bay Area Remembers the Loma Prieta Earthquake

KQED Science | October 15, 2014 | 1 Comment

Bay Area Remembers the Loma Prieta Earthquake

The 25th Anniversary of the Loma Prieta quake comes up on Friday, and the Bay Area is full of commemorative events, as well as resource fairs to help people prepare for future quakes.

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25 Years After the Loma Prieta Earthquake, Are We Safer?

KQED Science | October 13, 2014 | 1 Comment

25 Years After the Loma Prieta Earthquake, Are We Safer?

Bay Area taxpayers have spent billions of dollars over the last quarter-century to make our bridges, water pipes and power supplies safer in an earthquake. Experts say that means the Bay Area is much better off now. At the same time, the work is far from over.

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With Drought, New Scrutiny Over Fracking’s Water Use

KQED Science | October 10, 2014 | 6 Comments

With Drought, New Scrutiny Over Fracking’s Water Use

The drought is putting a spotlight on water use around California, including for hydraulic fracturing. How much water does fracking use and will it increase as companies tap into the Monterey Shale, estimated to be the largest oil resource in country?

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Anti-Fracking Activists in California Take Fight to County Ballots

KQED Science | October 10, 2014 | 16 Comments

Anti-Fracking Activists in California Take Fight to County Ballots

Activists are hoping local residents will do what state legislators haven’t done -- shut down the controversial oil production technique known as hydraulic fracturing.

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Stanford Scientist Shares Nobel in Chemistry

KQED Science | October 8, 2014 | 0 Comments

Stanford Scientist Shares Nobel in Chemistry

Two Americans and a German will share the Nobel Prize in chemistry for developing a new type of microscopy that allows researchers, for the first time, to see individual molecules inside living cells.

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Now You Can Take a Virtual Hike in California State Parks

KQED Science | October 8, 2014 | 3 Comments

Now You Can Take a Virtual Hike in California State Parks

You can now visit 14 California State Parks from the comfort of your own web browser, using Google Street View.

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Climate Change Has Uneven Effects on Ocean Warming

KQED Science | October 6, 2014 | 1 Comment

Climate Change Has Uneven Effects on Ocean Warming

Research published Sunday concluded that the upper 2,300 feet of the Southern Hemisphere’s oceans may have warmed twice as quickly after 1970 than had previously been thought.

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Do Wearables and Health Apps Belong in the Doctor’s Office?

KQED Science | October 6, 2014 | 2 Comments

Do Wearables and Health Apps Belong in the Doctor’s Office?

Wearables and health apps made a multi-billion-dollar industry out of healthy peoples' desires to count calories and rack up steps. Now can this technology make the transition to a medical setting, to help people with chronic illnesses?

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PG&E Tests Tech Adapted From NASA’s Mars Rover

KQED Science | October 2, 2014 | 0 Comments

PG&E Tests Tech Adapted From NASA’s Mars Rover

The sensor is based on a tool that's mounted on NASA's Mars Curiosity rover.

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California’s ‘Water Year’ Ends as Third Driest on Record

KQED Science | September 30, 2014 | 1 Comment

California’s ‘Water Year’ Ends as Third Driest on Record

Only 1924 and 1977 were drier. And there's little in the long-range forecasts to suggest a rebound soon.

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The Connection Between California’s Drought and Climate Change

KQED Science | September 29, 2014 | 1 Comment

The Connection Between California’s Drought and Climate Change

Climate change is making the weather pattern that's responsible for California's drought more likely, according to a new study from Stanford.

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Finding Faults: Scientists Close in on Napa Quake Origins

KQED Science | September 22, 2014 | 1 Comment

Finding Faults: Scientists Close in on Napa Quake Origins

The South Napa Earthquake revealed how much we've yet to learn about seismic faults in the Napa Valley.

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What to Know About California’s New Groundwater Law

KQED Science | September 17, 2014 | 22 Comments

What to Know About California’s New Groundwater Law

Governor Jerry Brown signed legislation Tuesday that will require the first-ever rules for pumping groundwater in California. Here's why lawmakers and the governor acted, and what the new laws mean.

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Stanford Psychologist Who Studies Racial Profiling Wins ‘Genius Grant’

KQED Science | September 17, 2014 | 0 Comments

Stanford Psychologist Who Studies Racial Profiling Wins ‘Genius Grant’

A professor whose research is helping a California police department improve its strained relationship with the black community and a lawyer who advocates for victims of domestic abuse are among the 21 winners of this year's MacArthur Foundation 'genius grants.'

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Why More Trees in the Sierra Mean Less Water for California

KQED Science | September 15, 2014 | 26 Comments

Why More Trees in the Sierra Mean Less Water for California

California water districts are eyeing a potential new source of water: trees. After a century of fire suppression, Sierra Nevada forests are more dense than ever before. And those pine trees are taking up a lot of water that might otherwise run off into California rivers.

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Environmentalists Sue Over Crude-by-Rail Safety

KQED Science | September 12, 2014 | 1 Comment

Environmentalists Sue Over Crude-by-Rail Safety

The environmental group Earthjustice is suing the U.S. Department of Transportation over the safety of the rail cars used to carry crude oil to California and around the country.

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