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California’s Tarantulas Are on the Move During Mating Season

KQED Science | October 11, 2013 | 0 Comments

California’s Tarantulas Are on the Move During Mating Season

Male California tarantulas are now roaming through the Bay Area looking for love. Find out more about where you can see them, what they're doing and what dangers they face from naturalist Sharol Nelson-Embry.

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The Science of California’s Seismic Pests, or Earthquake “Swarms”

KQED Science | October 10, 2013 | 3 Comments

The Science of California’s Seismic Pests, or Earthquake “Swarms”

Scientists are creeping their way toward better understanding of earthquake swarms, those annoying and sometimes damaging seismic pests we get in California.

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Your Car Could Run On Gasoline Made From Bacteria in the Future

KQED Science | October 7, 2013 | 0 Comments

Your Car Could Run On Gasoline Made From Bacteria in the Future

Imagine if instead of digging oil up out of the ground and refining it into gasoline, we could just have bacteria make it for us in a big vat somewhere. Researchers from South Korea have done just that -- engineered bacteria to make gasoline -- but many challenges remain before large scale production becomes viable.

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NASA Robots Are Sniffing For Clues on Mars and Titan

KQED Science | October 4, 2013 | 0 Comments

NASA Robots Are Sniffing For Clues on Mars and Titan

NASA's Curiosity rover on Mars has raised some eyebrows by something it has not detected: methane. And, much farther out, the Cassini spacecraft has made a positive detection of plastic in the atmosphere of Saturn's moon Titan.

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Remembering Professor Terry Wright, A Creative Juggler of Scientific Ideas

KQED Science | October 3, 2013 | 2 Comments

Remembering Professor Terry Wright, A Creative Juggler of Scientific Ideas

The practice of science is like the practice of juggling: it all depends on the skill and trust of partners. The late Terry Wright, professor emeritus at Sonoma State University, was an exemplar of the type.

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A Squid’s Switchable Cells Offer Key to Camouflage

KQED Science | October 1, 2013 | 0 Comments

A Squid’s Switchable Cells Offer Key to Camouflage

New research shows that market squid may have something to offer the engineering sector: skin cells that can switch between transparent and white. Humans could use these cells to develop new bio-inspired materials; squid probably use them for cross-dressing.

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Can Sea Otters Make a Comeback in the San Francisco Bay?

KQED Science | September 27, 2013 | 3 Comments

Can Sea Otters Make a Comeback in the San Francisco Bay?

Sea otters once inhabited the San Francisco Bay. Learn about a new study at Elkhorn Slough that holds some hope for re-establishing otters in our estuary someday.

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Pakistan’s New Earthquake Island: Can It Happen Here?

KQED Science | September 26, 2013 | 1 Comment

Pakistan’s New Earthquake Island: Can It Happen Here?

The rise of a small, fuming island after a large distant quake may not be such an exotic event. Look for one when the next Big One strikes California.

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Peeling Away the Moon’s Mysteries

KQED Science | September 23, 2013 | 1 Comment

Peeling Away the Moon’s Mysteries

The moon often seems like an ancient relic of space exploration, that dusty, dry, airless ball of rock and soil that we visited decades ago and have since left alone—possibly because we found nothing there but dust, rock, and soil? Not so fast. Exploration in the past few years has revealed aspects of the moon that contradict what we were taught in school.

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Why Are So Many People Right-Handed? Genetic Research May Hold The Clues

KQED Science | September 23, 2013 | 9 Comments

Why Are So Many People Right-Handed? Genetic Research May Hold The Clues

Scientists have struggled for a long time to explain why 85-90 percent of people are right-handed. They’ve known genetics plays an important role in people occasionally ending up left-handed, but they also know it is not the whole story.

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New Research Sheds Light on Earthquakes That Occur Far Below Earth’s Surface

KQED Science | September 19, 2013 | 6 Comments

New Research Sheds Light on Earthquakes That Occur Far Below Earth’s Surface

Two new papers shed light on the deepest earthquakes: one by documenting the largest deep event yet recorded, the other by reproducing these events at the nanoscale in the high-pressure lab.

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Diverse Populations of Terns Return to the Bay Area

KQED Science | September 13, 2013 | 2 Comments

Diverse Populations of Terns Return to the Bay Area

Terns can be found in the Bay Area year round, but they're not all the same species. Learn more about the diversity of tern populations that visit us.

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Blue Oaks Shine New Light on California’s Past Climate

KQED Science | September 12, 2013 | 0 Comments

Blue Oaks Shine New Light on California’s Past Climate

A new climate chronology for California has come from one of our quintessential trees, the blue oak.

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The Real Vaccine Roulette: Missing Your Baby’s Scheduled Shots

KQED Science | September 9, 2013 | 15 Comments

The Real Vaccine Roulette: Missing Your Baby’s Scheduled Shots

Some parents are choosing to delay, space out or forgo their children's recommended vaccinations. But according to a new study, every shot parents choose to skip greatly increases their children's risk of getting a potentially fatal infectious disease.

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Molecular Scissors May Help Potentially Cure AIDS in the Future

KQED Science | September 9, 2013 | 20 Comments

Molecular Scissors May Help Potentially Cure AIDS in the Future

Ever since AIDS emerged as a deadly disease in the early 1980’s, scientists have been looking for a cure. And now, using a very precise set of DNA scissors, they may finally be taking baby steps towards one.

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Comet ISON: Comet of the Century or Fanciful Fluff?

KQED Science | September 6, 2013 | 3 Comments

Comet ISON: Comet of the Century or Fanciful Fluff?

A comet named ISON has been hailed as a possible "comet of the century." But scientists aren't sure yet if it will survive a hairpin turn around the sun.

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How California’s Warping Microplate Makes Its Faults Creep

KQED Science | September 5, 2013 | 1 Comment

How California’s Warping Microplate Makes Its Faults Creep

A tectonic "Big Drip" beneath the southern Sierra Nevada is connected to the creeping faults of Northern California in a new paper published in Geology.

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Kids Explore the World Through Science Photography at San Jose’s Children’s Discovery Museum

KQED Science | September 3, 2013 | 0 Comments

Kids Explore the World Through Science Photography at San Jose’s Children’s Discovery Museum

The San Jose Children's Discovery Museum has a new program that introduces seventh, eighth and ninth graders to digital SLR cameras and the basic principles of photography. It's also a first-time science experience for many students.

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New Portable Device Rapidly Measures Radiation Exposure

KQED Science | September 3, 2013 | 6 Comments

New Portable Device Rapidly Measures Radiation Exposure

Local scientists have developed a small, portable device that can quickly test a person’s level of radiation exposure and could be used for victims in a large-scale radiological accident or terrorist attack.

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Sand Mining in San Francisco Bay to Replenish Alameda’s Crown Beach

KQED Science | August 30, 2013 | 1 Comment

Sand Mining in San Francisco Bay to Replenish Alameda’s Crown Beach

Crown Memorial State Beach in Alameda is set to be replenished in a long-awaited project to replace sand lost in high storm years. Learn about the beach and sand mining in San Francisco Bay.

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