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<a href=http://ww2.kqed.org/futureofyou/2015/04/01/hackers-teach-computers-to-tell-healthy-and-sick-brain-cells-apart/ target=_blank >Hackers Teach Computers to Tell Healthy and Sick Brain Cells Apart</a>

KQED Science | April 1, 2015

Hackers Teach Computers to Tell Healthy and Sick Brain Cells Apart

Brain researchers are joining forces with computer hackers to tackle a big challenge in neuroscience: teaching computers how to tell a healthy neuron from a sick one. “Sick neurons have a withered appearance, much like a sick plant has a withered appearance,” says Jane Roskams, an executive director at the ...Read More

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2015/04/01/159414/a_leap_forward_in_the_science_of_human_locomotion?source=npr&category=science target=_blank >A Leap Forward In The Science Of Human Locomotion</a>

KQED News | April 1, 2015

A Leap Forward In The Science Of Human Locomotion

If you have two legs, there are a variety of ways you can get around. Walking, running, leaping, hopping, skipping, prancing, powerwalking, heck, even grape-vining. The list goes on and on. But what is the most efficient? Not the fastest, but the most efficient: requiring of ...Read More

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<a href=http://blogs.kqed.org/education/2015/03/31/to-what-extent-should-organisms-be-collected-from-the-wild/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=to-what-extent-should-organisms-be-collected-from-the-wild target=_blank >To What Extent Should Organisms Be Collected from the Wild?</a>

KQED Science | March 31, 2015

To What Extent Should Organisms Be Collected from the Wild?

From KQED Education Do Now: For centuries, museums and scientists have been collecting animals, plants and other organisms from the wild for research purposes. To what extent do you think collecting living and nonliving specimens should be allowed?

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<a href=http://ww2.kqed.org/news/2015/03/31/san-bruno-officials-want-bigger-fine-upheld-against-pge-over-pipeline-blast target=_blank >San Bruno Officials Want Bigger Fine Upheld Against PG&E Over Pipeline Blast</a>

KQED News | March 31, 2015

San Bruno Officials Want Bigger Fine Upheld Against PG&E Over Pipeline Blast

San Bruno city officials are calling on the California Public Utilities Commission to uphold a proposed $1.6 billion fine against Pacific Gas & Electric for the 2010 pipeline blast that killed eight people. At a press conference Tuesday outside PUC headquarters in San Francisco, Mayor Jim Ruane said “a historic penalty ...Read More

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<a href=http://ww2.kqed.org/news/2015/03/31/state-bill-seeks-to-shine-light-on-chemicals-in-cleaning-products target=_blank >State Bill Seeks to Shine Light on Chemicals in Cleaning Products</a>

KQED News | March 31, 2015

State Bill Seeks to Shine Light on Chemicals in Cleaning Products

Half Moon Bay resident Marika Holmgren had no family history of breast cancer, so she was pretty surprised when she was diagnosed eight years ago, at the age of 37. Holmgren, a longtime environmentalist, started looking into what could have caused her illness.

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<a href=http://ww2.kqed.org/news/2015/03/31/ebmud-blames-drought-for-pungent-taste-of-tap-water target=_blank >EBMUD Blames Drought for ‘Pungent’ Taste of Tap Water</a>

KQED News | March 31, 2015

EBMUD Blames Drought for ‘Pungent’ Taste of Tap Water

The drought is causing some tap water in the East Bay to taste bad this week, and the water district that serves more than a million customers there says it's the drought's fault. A change in how the East Bay Municipal Utility District pulls water from its main Sierra ...Read More

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<a href=http://blogs.kqed.org/stateofhealth/2015/03/31/is-pollution-from-asia-making-the-central-valleys-bad-air-even-worse/ target=_blank >Is Pollution From Asia Making the Central Valley’s Bad Air Even Worse?</a>

State of Health | March 31, 2015

Is Pollution From Asia Making the Central Valley’s Bad Air Even Worse?

Advocates say the San Joaquin Valley Air District should focus on sources it can control, like farming machinery. (David McNew/Getty Images) By Alice Daniel California's Central Valley grapples with some of the dirtiest air in the nation. The culprits range from its vast agriculture industry to trucks on Highway 99. But one ...Read More

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What Happens When You Put a Hummingbird in a Wind Tunnel?

KQED Science | March 31, 2015 | 2 Comments

What Happens When You Put a Hummingbird in a Wind Tunnel?

Scientists use a high-speed camera to film hummingbirds' aerial acrobatics at 1000 frames per second. They see, frame by frame, how neither wind nor rain stop these tiniest of birds from fueling up.

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<a href=http://ww2.kqed.org/futureofyou/2015/03/30/fighting-ebola-in-west-africa-qa-with-steven-vanroekel/ target=_blank >Fighting Ebola in West Africa: Q&A with Steven VanRoekel</a>

KQED Science | March 30, 2015

Fighting Ebola in West Africa: Q&A with Steven VanRoekel

As the chief innovation officer at USAID, Steven VanRoekel coordinated the U.S. government's response to the Ebola outbreak in West Africa.

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2015/03/30/159265/want_to_do_a_little_astrophysics_this_app_detects_cosmic_rays?source=npr&category=science target=_blank >Want To Do A Little Astrophysics? This App Detects Cosmic Rays</a>

KQED News | March 30, 2015

Want To Do A Little Astrophysics? This App Detects Cosmic Rays

Scientists in California are hoping to use your smart phone to solve a cosmic mystery. They're developing an app to turn your phone into a cosmic ray detector. If enough people install the app, the scientists think they'll be able to figure out once and for all what's producing the ...Read More

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Drought Hasn’t Dampened Gorgeous Bay Area Wildflowers Display

KQED Science | March 27, 2015 | 3 Comments

Drought Hasn’t Dampened Gorgeous Bay Area Wildflowers Display

The drought hasn't held back the wildflowers this year. See what's blooming in naturalist Sharol Nelson-Embrys blog.

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<a href=http://ww2.kqed.org/futureofyou/robotics-surgeons-google-jandj target=_blank >Robotic Surgeons on the Horizon From Google, Johnson & Johnson Team</a>

KQED Science | March 27, 2015

Robotic Surgeons on the Horizon From Google, Johnson & Johnson Team

Your surgeon's favorite new assistant? A robotic arm. It may seem like the stuff of science fiction, but nimble robot hands are routinely used by surgeons in complex surgeries today. The field has grown dramatically in recent years, with hospitals around the country performing thousands of robot-assisted surgeries every year. And now, ...Read More

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Researchers at SLAC Study Promising Alternative to Morphine

KQED Science | March 27, 2015 | 3 Comments

Researchers at SLAC Study Promising Alternative to Morphine

Researchers are now studying a new kind of pain reliever with less side effects than morphine, using the Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2015/03/27/159074/what_can_bonobos_teach_us_about_play?source=npr&category=science target=_blank >What Can Bonobos Teach Us About Play?</a>

KQED News | March 27, 2015

What Can Bonobos Teach Us About Play?

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode Press Play About Isabel Behncke's TED Talk Primatologist Isabel Behncke explains how bonobo apes learn by constantly playing. She says play isn't frivolous; it appears to be a critical way to solve problems and avoid conflict. About Isabel Behncke Primatologist Isabel Behncke studies the ...Read More

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2015/03/26/159020/big_shelves_of_antarctic_ice_melting_faster_than_scientists?source=npr&category=science target=_blank >Big Shelves of Antarctic Ice Melting Faster Than Scientists Thought</a>

KQED News | March 26, 2015

Big Shelves of Antarctic Ice Melting Faster Than Scientists Thought

The Antarctic is far away, freezing and buried under a patchwork of ice sheets and glaciers. But a warming climate is altering that mosaic in unpredictable ways — research published Thursday shows that the pace of change in parts of the Antarctic is accelerating. Many of the ice sheets that blanket ...Read More

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/epArchive/R201503261000?pid=RD19 target=_blank >National Park Service Director on the Future of America's Parks</a>

Forum | March 26, 2015

National Park Service Director on the Future of America's Parks

Jonathan Jarvis, director of the National Park Service, talks about the future of our national parks.

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<a href=http://ww2.kqed.org/mindshift/2014/05/27/robots-in-the-classroom-what-are-they-good-for/ target=_blank >Robots in the Classroom: What Are They Good For?</a>

Mindshift | March 26, 2015

Robots in the Classroom: What Are They Good For?

(Stephen Chin/Flickr) Talk of robots in the classroom may have seemed far fetched a few years ago, but it's safe to say that the future has arrived – at least in some classrooms. Educators are beginning to experiment with how robots can add value to their classrooms, and while it's by ...Read More

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<a href=http://ww2.kqed.org/futureofyou/2015/03/26/university-and-biotech-firm-team-up-on-colorblindness-therapy/ target=_blank >University and Biotech Firm Team Up on Colorblindness Therapy</a>

KQED Science | March 26, 2015

University and Biotech Firm Team Up on Colorblindness Therapy

Six years ago, husband-and-wife scientists used gene therapy to cure colorblindness in monkeys. Now they’re trying to make it work for the millions of people with faulty color vision.

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Tsunami Preparedness Week: Building a Network of Awareness

KQED Science | March 26, 2015 | 0 Comments

Tsunami Preparedness Week: Building a Network of Awareness

Tsunamis are a worldwide menace with specific local threats. It pays to learn your local situation and keep the knowledge fresh in your community.

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2015/03/25/158930/super_termite_could_be_even_more_destructive_than_parent_species?source=npr&category=science target=_blank >'Super Termite' Could Be Even More Destructive Than Parent Species</a>

KQED News | March 25, 2015

'Super Termite' Could Be Even More Destructive Than Parent Species

Scientists in Florida have tracked the development of a new hybrid species of termite — one whose colonies grow twice as fast as the parent species. Termites are among the world's most destructive pests — causing more than a billion dollars in damage each year in the U.S. alone. Researchers say the ...Read More

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