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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2014/11/23/150240/why_people_take_risks_to_help_others_altruisms_roots_in_the?source=npr&category=science target=_blank >Why People Take Risks To Help Others: Altruism's Roots In The Brain</a>

KQED News | November 23, 2014

Why People Take Risks To Help Others: Altruism's Roots In The Brain

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. ...Read More

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<a href=http://ww2.kqed.org/news/2014/11/12/comet-landing-a-success-european-craft-makes-fairly-gentle-touch-down target=_blank >Where's Philae? Space Agency Narrows Search Area for Lost Comet Lander</a>

KQED News | November 21, 2014

Where's Philae? Space Agency Narrows Search Area for Lost Comet Lander

Philae made a thud, bounced, and hasn't been seen since by the Rosetta mother ship.

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2014/11/21/150125/how_can_we_find_more_time_to_be_still?source=npr&category=science target=_blank >How Can We Find More Time To Be Still?</a>

KQED News | November 21, 2014

How Can We Find More Time To Be Still?

Pico Iyer says sitting still and reflecting is hard work, but we bring so much more to our experiences and relationships when we make time to think.

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AT&T Could Pay $50 Million for Illegal E-Waste Dumping

KQED Science | November 20, 2014 | 0 Comments

AT&T Could Pay $50 Million for Illegal E-Waste Dumping

Preliminary settlement agreement directs new funds to prosecute environmental and consumer crimes.

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Using 3D Visualization, Geologists Explore the Complex Areas Where Faults Join and Split

KQED Science | November 20, 2014 | 0 Comments

Using 3D Visualization, Geologists Explore the Complex Areas Where Faults Join and Split

The cutting edge in earthquake research is mapping our most important faults in three-dimensional detail. A new paper finds some key hidden links in the Bay Area's fault system.

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/video/darfur-stoves-project/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=darfur-stoves-project target=_blank >Darfur Stoves Project</a>

QUEST | November 20, 2014

Darfur Stoves Project

At first, Ashok Gadgil didn’t know how he, as an engineer, could hope to ease Darfur's refugee crisis. But when he learned that women in the camps cooked using traditional methods in which their cooking pots sit atop three stones, with a fire burning in the middle, he saw the spark of a solution.

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<a href=http://ww2.kqed.org/news/2014/11/19/water-board-weighs-phasing-out-diablo-canyons-cooling-system target=_blank >Water Board Weighs Phasing Out Diablo Canyon’s Cooling System</a>

KQED News | November 19, 2014

Water Board Weighs Phasing Out Diablo Canyon’s Cooling System

The power plant near San Luis Obispo pulls in 2.5 billion gallons of seawater every day, and then lets it out, 20 degrees warmer, back into the ocean. The system is known to cause marine damage, harming billions of fish larvae.

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/video/searching-for-life-on-mars-2/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=searching-for-life-on-mars-2 target=_blank >Searching for Life on Mars</a>

QUEST | November 19, 2014

Searching for Life on Mars

More than two years after its precisely calibrated landing on the floor of a Martian crater in August 2012, NASA's one ton, SUV-sized Curiosity rover has traveled more than five miles across the rocky, massive Gale crater to the base of an 18,000-foot mountain, Mount Sharp.

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Efforts to Restore Monarch Butterflies’ Milkweed Habitats May Be Doing More Harm Than Good

KQED Science | November 19, 2014 | 3 Comments

Efforts to Restore Monarch Butterflies’ Milkweed Habitats May Be Doing More Harm Than Good

Migratory monarch butterfly populations have fallen into a tailspin in recent years. Scientists fear that in a classic case of good intentions gone awry, efforts to help the beleaguered butterflies may be inadvertently making matters worse by changing their behavior.

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Want to Go to Mars? A Cheaper Alternative Resides in Chile’s Atacama Desert

KQED Science | November 19, 2014 | 1 Comment

Want to Go to Mars? A Cheaper Alternative Resides in Chile’s Atacama Desert

If you want to go to Mars but can’t quite afford the hundreds of billions of dollars for a ticket, there is another solution: consider instead a trip to the Atacama Desert in Chile.

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This Week’s Rain Unlikely to Dent Drought

KQED Science | November 18, 2014 | 0 Comments

This Week’s Rain Unlikely to Dent Drought

Rain systems so far this season have been on the wimpy side. This next series is likely to continue the trend.

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What Gall! The Crazy Cribs of Parasitic Wasps

KQED Science | November 18, 2014 | 0 Comments

What Gall! The Crazy Cribs of Parasitic Wasps

Plenty of animals build their homes in oak trees. But some very teeny, tricky wasps make the tree do all the work. “What nerve!” you might say. What… gall! And you’d be right. The wasps are called gall-inducers. And each miniature mansion that the trees build for the wasps' larvae is weirder and more flamboyant than the next.

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Helix Science Center in Los Altos Will Close Its Doors at the End of November

KQED Science | November 18, 2014 | 0 Comments

Helix Science Center in Los Altos Will Close Its Doors at the End of November

Helix, a Los Altos "community science center" run by the Exploratorium, will close its doors on November 30. The 5,000-square-foot space brought hands-on science exhibits, a classroom with ever-changing activities and a museum gift shop to downtown Los Altos.

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Designing California Cities for a Long-Term Drought

KQED Science | November 18, 2014 | 7 Comments

Designing California Cities for a Long-Term Drought

Scientists say it’s possible California’s drought may last a lot longer than a few years. No one knows for sure, but we could all simply have to adjust to a drier climate. That could mean changing the way we build cities to make them more porous. The 'Hydramax,' a futuristic design pictured above, rises with the tide and captures water from the air.

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Scientists Suspect a Virus is Causing Sea Star Die-Off

KQED Science | November 17, 2014 | 1 Comment

Scientists Suspect a Virus is Causing Sea Star Die-Off

But the virus isn't new to sea stars, so what triggered the current outbreak remains a mystery.

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/video/secrets-of-the-spider-web/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=secrets-of-the-spider-web target=_blank >Secrets of the Spider Web</a>

QUEST | November 17, 2014

Secrets of the Spider Web

Todd Blackledge admits that he sometimes gets called Spider-Man, but he's not scaling any walls or slinging webs at bad guys. An evolutionary biologist at the University of Akron, Blackledge studies spiders and their webs, a topic that he finds endlessly fascinating.

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Scientists Find Genes in Mice That May Lead to Future Ebola Treatments

KQED Science | November 17, 2014 | 0 Comments

Scientists Find Genes in Mice That May Lead to Future Ebola Treatments

Scientists have identified Ebola-resistant and Ebola-sensitive mouse strains. Not only will the sensitive mice be useful as a relatively quick way to test new Ebola treatments, but by comparing its genetics to those of the resistant strains, scientists may find new ways to treat Ebola.

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<a href=http://blogs.kqed.org/lowdown/2014/11/17/why-californias-drought-is-americas-problem/ target=_blank >Why California’s Drought is America’s Problem</a>

The Lowdown | November 17, 2014

Why California’s Drought is America’s Problem

Despite a few recent downpours, California remains stuck in one of the most severe statewide droughts on record. But it's far from just California's problem. The state produces a huge percentage of the nation's agriculture — nearly half of all fruits, vegetables and nuts, by some estimates.

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2014/11/16/149679/yes_the_weather_is_polar_no_its_not_the_vortex?source=npr&category=science target=_blank >Yes, the Weather is Polar. No, it's not the Vortex</a>

KQED News | November 16, 2014

Yes, the Weather is Polar. No, it's not the Vortex

Much of the country had to bundle up this week due to some unusually cold weather. Even in the deep South, residents struggled with temperatures in the low 20s. With the big chill comes the revival of an ominous phrase: "the polar vortex." The sinister-sounding label has been hard to escape.

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<a href=http://ww2.kqed.org/news/2014/11/14/drought-photos-see-lake-oroville-fall-near-historic-low-over-20-months target=_blank >Drought Photos: See Lake Oroville Fall Near Historic Low Over 20 Months</a>

KQED News | November 14, 2014

Drought Photos: See Lake Oroville Fall Near Historic Low Over 20 Months

"Drought poster child" lake sits just 5 feet above record low point, forcing people to rappel down to their boats at Bidwell Marina. If the water surface level drops much more, it could cause problems for hydroelectric power generation at Hyatt Power Plant in the bedrock of Lake Oroville.

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