KQED Launches Extensive Coverage of the Digital Health Revolution with “Future of You”

Contact: Sevda Eris, seris@kqed.org, 415.553.2835

Future of You Documentary Premieres on QUEST Wednesday, November 5

San Francisco, CA – A new era in health care is taking off spurred on by Silicon Valley. High-tech tools are allowing people to unlock information about their bodies and track everything from sleep to stress – even the bacteria in their guts. KQED is the first public media company to examine this new digital health trend with in-depth, on-going coverage through Future of You. This new multimedia initiative launches with a half-hour television documentary that explores how new technologies could reshape medical research, forever change our relationship with our doctors, and impact the treatment of chronic illnesses. Future of You premieres on QUEST, Wednesday, November 5 at 7:30pm on KQED 9.

“While working on this documentary, it became clear to me that the digital disruption that has transformed banking, the music industry and other sectors is finally disrupting health care,” says Sheraz Sadiq, the documentary’s producer.

Sadiq interviewed prominent individuals at the forefront of this digital health movement including:
•Dr. Jeffrey Olgin, chief of cardiology at UC San Francisco Medical Center, who is leading the world’s first all-electronic heart disease study using smartphones, apps and wearable devices;
•James Park, CEO of Fitbit, the leading manufacturer of activity tracking devices;
•Dr. George Savage, chief medical officer of Proteus Digital Health, a company that developed the world’s first FDA-approved ingestible sensor; and
•Halle Tecco, managing director of Rock Health, a San Francisco firm that invests in innovative health care startups.

“This consumer-centric approach could eventually transform health care,” says Andrea Kissack, KQED’s senior science editor who is leading the Future of You multimedia initiative and has been following the digital health space closely. “Although this trend offers a lot of promises, it also raises a lot of questions that we will explore, from privacy issues to a new digital divide.”

The multimedia project will cover the intersection of medicine, health care and emerging technologies through ongoing news reports such as “Apple Jumps into Health and Fitness Market,” radio reports such as “Do Wearable’s Belong in the Doctor’s Office?” and blog posts like “Health Trackers May Be the Rage, But How Useful Are They?

KQED will further explore these new trends in an upcoming free public event, “Tracking the New Digital Health Revolution,” at The Tech Museum of Innovation in San Jose on Thursday, November 20 from 7-9pm.

Other new QUEST episodes this fall investigate life on Mars, Napa wineries and climate change, disintegrating sea stars, a ban on the sale of shark fins, a new law to help protect the endangered California condor and more. Episodes air Wednesdays at 7:30pm on KQED 9 through December 17 and can also be watched online at kqed.org/quest.

About QUEST
Launched in 2007, QUEST is KQED’s award-winning, multimedia series covering science, environment and nature stories from the Bay Area and beyond. Support of QUEST and Future of You are provided by the National Science Foundation, HopeLab, The David B. Gold Foundation, S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, The Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, The Vadasz Family Foundation, George G. and Jeanette A. Stuart Charitable Trust and the members of KQED. QUEST and Future of You are projects of KQED Science. KQED Science is the largest science and environment reporting unit in California.

About KQED
KQED serves the people of Northern California with a public-supported alternative to commercial media. Home to the most listened-to public radio station in the nation, one of the highest-rated public television services and an award-winning education program, and as a leader and innovator in interactive technology, KQED takes people of all ages on journeys of exploration — exposing them to new people, places and ideas.

QUEST Premieres 100th Television Episode on April 2 at 7:30pm on KQED 9

Contact: Sevda Eris, Publicist, seris@kqed.org, 415.553.2835

Explore High-Tech Bikes, Hydrogen Cars, Wolves, Seed Diversity and De-extinction

QUEST, the Emmy Award-winning multimedia science series produced by KQED and five public media partner stations across the country, premieres a new spring lineup of television episodes that tell revealing stories about science and environmental issues, beginning Wednesday, April 2, at 7:30pm on KQED 9.

“QUEST has come a long way since it first launched in 2007 on KQED. We have not only earned the highest accolades and awards for our science reporting, but we have also expanded the series to other regions in the U.S.,” says Sue Ellen McCann, executive in charge of KQED’s Science Unit. “QUEST helped to create the largest science and environment reporting unit in California which is now KQED Science. We are thrilled to achieve this milestone in our science reporting with outstanding contributions from our partner stations.”

Over the past seven years, QUEST has reported on a wide variety of topics from edible insects to private companies planning to launch rockets to the moon. Some of QUEST’s awards include: two American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAs) awards for science journalism; 11 Regional Emmys; six Society of Environmental Journalists national awards; and 12 awards from the Society of Professional Journalists.

“QUEST’s new episodes explore the complex tapestry of biodiversity in America, the essential roles that humans, animals and plants are playing in efforts to slow climate change, and the remarkable innovations being pioneered by scientists and engineers to secure a sustainable future,” says Jason Black, QUEST’s executive producer.

QUEST’s new, four half-hour television episodes hosted by Simran Sethi are:
Inventing the Future: Bikes, Bugs and Fashionistas (April 2) – Go behind the scenes with a North Carolina inventor building sun-powered “carcycles;” meet an Ohio engineer transforming flies into fishmeal; and visit a Nebraska textile engineer converting corn husks into fashion.
Keeping it Cool: Sea Otters, New Cars and Old Forests (April 9) – Meet biologists in Washington state exploring the surprising connection between sea otters and climate change; take a test drive in San Francisco with new hydrogen-powered cars that only emit water vapor; and find out how scientists in Wisconsin are working to build a more resilient forest.
Back to the Wild: Wolves, Seeds and Snapshots (April 16) – Discover why wolves and other feared predators in Washington state are an essential part of the ecosystem; find out how saving seeds in the Midwest is preserving food diversity; and meet a Great Plains photographer documenting the wild nature of our iconic landscapes.
Reawakening Extinct Species (April 23) – New genetic technologies are making it possible for scientists to try to bring back extinct species. Meet researcher Ben Novak at the University of California, Santa Cruz, who is working to revive the passenger pigeon, once the most abundant bird in the world, and Harvard Medical School’s George Church, who is trying to engineer a woolly mammoth. It may be possible, but is it right to turn back the clock?

Multimedia Series
In addition to featuring its television episodes online, QUESTScience.org, features Web videos and articles, radio reports, education assets and resources, links to community partners and opportunities for engagement through QUEST Science’s social media presence on Facebook, Google+ and Twitter.

Of note, QUEST is producing the following new online videos with host Simran Sethi expanding on biodiversity topics covered in the “Wolves, Seeds and Snapshots” episode:
Environmental Awareness Through Art (April 11) – Meet an artist who turns staggering statistics into powerful works of art that illuminate the impact of human behavior on the environment.
The Seed Vault (April 25) – Discover a group of scientists working to guarantee crop diversity by storing seeds in a fail-safe vault on a tiny island between Norway and the North Pole.

About QUEST
QUEST is an Emmy-award winning multimedia science series originally created and launched by KQED in San Francisco in 2007. In September of 2012, QUEST received a prestigious grant of $2.5 million from the National Science Foundation to focus storytelling around sustainability science, and to expand its multimedia science reporting model to five additional public media partner stations across the country. The grant covers production, education resources and community engagement from 2012-2014.

Since its inception, QUEST has reached more than 60 million viewers and listeners through its traditional television and radio broadcasts, its growing Web audience, educator training and community outreach. QUEST continues to experience strong growth in viewership both in traditional broadcast and online with more than 1.5 million viewers from October 2013 – January 2014.

Of note, QUEST’s half-hour special, “Reawakening Extinct Species,” was produced with additional funding for KQED Science from The Follis Family Fund; Mary Van Voorhees Fund; S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation; The Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation; The Vadasz Family Foundation; and the members of KQED.

Partner Stations
QUEST is a co-production of the following six public media stations: QUEST Nebraska (NET, Nebraska), QUEST North Carolina (UNC-TV, North Carolina), QUEST Northern California (KQED, San Francisco), QUEST Northwest (KCTS 9, Seattle), QUEST Ohio (WVIZ, WCPN, Ideastream, Cleveland) and QUEST Wisconsin (WPR, WPT, WI Media Lab, ICS, Wisconsin).

Producers
QUEST’s management team is housed at KQED and includes: Jason Black, executive producer; Lisa Landers, managing editor; Adrienne Calo, lead coordinating producer; Lucy Laffitte, Ph.D., education manager; Amy Miller, television series producer; and Mike Kahn, social media producer. Find out more about QUEST’s partner stations and producers here.

About KQED
KQED serves the people of Northern California with a public-supported alternative to commercial media. Home to one of the most listened-to public radio stations in the nation, one of the highest-rated public television services and an award-winning education program, and as a leader and innovator in interactive technology, KQED takes people of all ages on journeys of exploration — exposing them to new people, places and ideas.

QUEST Launches New Science Series with Award-Winning Host Simran Sethi

Contact: Sevda Eris, Publicist, seris@kqed.org, 415.553.2835

Television Season Premieres with
Lake Tahoe Special
at 7:30pm, October 16, on KQED 9

 

QUEST, KQED’s award-winning multimedia science series, has a new focus on the science of sustainability; a new host, Simran Sethi; and a new team of science and environment reporters from public media stations across the country.

QUEST kicks off its new television season at 7:30pm on Wednesday, October 16, on KQED with a half-hour special, Lake Tahoe: Can We Save It?, examining the lake’s storied history and the small army of scientists and others who are working daily to turn back the clock to a time when you could see 100 feet down into its blue waters.

“Everyone is so motivated to preserve Tahoe’s natural beauty, but all the work involved really highlighted the fragility of the whole endeavor,” says Gabriela Quirós, the documentary’s producer.

The program features Geoffrey Schladow, director of the University of California at Davis Tahoe Environmental Research Center (TERC) and TERC’s Brant Allen, who drops a plastic disc into the lake every ten days to monitor its clarity. Also featured are the US Forest Service’s restoration of an important Tahoe wetland, and inspectors who make sure boats don’t carry invasive mussels into the lake.

QUEST’s new episodes focus on the many ways in which science, technology, engineering and sheer ingenuity are being used to address issues related to water, food, energy, climate and biodiversity.

“I am thrilled to be a part this new QUEST series that is helping people make connections between science and all that helps sustain us: from food and water to climate and energy,” says new host Simran Sethi, an award-winning journalist and educator who teaches and reports on sustainability and environmental issues. “This work, these innovations and this co-created future belong to all of us.”

Named “the environmental messenger” by Vanity Fair and a “top ten eco-hero” by the UK’s Guardian, Simran is currently writing a book on the loss of agricultural biodiversity in our food. She has also been featured on NBC Nightly News, CNBC, The Oprah Winfrey Show and the Today show.

QUEST, a multimedia science series launched in 2007 at KQED in San Francisco, has expanded to a national collaboration that includes QUEST Nebraska (NET, Nebraska); QUEST North Carolina (UNC-TV, North Carolina); QUEST Northern California (KQED, San Francisco); QUEST Northwest (KCTS 9, Seattle); QUEST Ohio (WVIZ, WCPN,WCLV,ideastream, Cleveland); and QUEST Wisconsin (WPR, WPT, WI Media Lab, ICS, Wisconsin).

“Innovation and high-caliber science reporting have been the keys to QUEST’s success and the series will continue to push the boundaries of what media coverage can achieve in increasing public understanding of critical environmental challenges,” says Jason Black, QUEST executive producer. “QUEST simultaneously draws on public media producers’ expertise as informal educators and their investigative skills as they report on some of the most important and complex topics of our time.”

QUEST’s fall television lineup includes the following five half-hour episodes:
Lake Tahoe: Can We Save It? (10/16) – Follows the scientists working to turn back the clock to a time when you could see 100 feet down into the second-deepest lake in the United States
From Farm to Fork to Fuel (10/23) – Explores urban farming in Milwaukee; new ways to reduce food waste in San Francisco and beyond; and how cooking grease is turned into biofuel in North Carolina
Restoring America’s Waters (10/30) – Investigates efforts to rebuild oyster reefs in North Carolina; to battle algae blooms in Lake Erie; and to restore salmon to a dammed river in Washington state
America’s Energy Future (11/6) – Examines the world’s largest solar thermal farm in California; fracking in Ohio; and new energy-efficient home designs in Missouri
Next Meal: Engineering Food (11/13) – Explores the science behind genetically engineered crops and what the future holds for research and regulations

Multimedia Series
A new website, QUESTScience.org, showcasing QUEST’s new focus features:
Television Episodes – Five half-hour episodes broadcasting this fall and three half-hour episodes broadcasting in the Spring of 2014
Radio Reports – 20 public radio features
Web Series and Articles – A 12-part Web video series and more than one hundred online articles
Education Assets and Training – Multimedia resources made specifically for use in educational settings and in-depth educator training on using these assets
Community Outreach – Events with community partners, and other collaborations
Social Media – A social media presence through QUEST Science on Facebook , Google+ and Twitter
QUEST will host a Google+ Hangout On Air with Simran Sethi at 4pm (PST) on Monday, October 14.

About the Producers
QUEST’s management team is housed at KQED and includes Jason Black, executive producer; Lisa Landers, managing editor; Adrienne Calo, lead coordinating producer; Lucy Laffitte, Ph.D., education manager; Amy Miller, television series producer; and Mike Kahn, social media producer. Gabriela Quirós and Sheraz Sadiq are QUEST Northern California television producers. Lindsey Hoshaw is QUEST Northern California coordinating producer. Find out more about QUEST’s stations and producers here.

Funders
Funding for QUEST is provided by the National Science Foundation with a two-year, $2.5 million grant. The grant covers production, education resources and community engagement from 2012 through 2014. For this season of QUEST, “Lake Tahoe: Can We Save It?” and “Next Meal Engineering Food” were produced with additional funding for KQED Science by The Follis Family Fund; Mary Van Voorhees Fund; S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation; The David B. Gold Foundation; The Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation; The Vadasz Family Foundation; Wyncote Foundation; Amgen Foundation; and the members of KQED.

About KQED
KQED serves the people of Northern California with a public-supported alternative to commercial media. Home to the most listened-to public radio station in the nation, one of the highest-rated public television services and an award-winning education program, and as a leader and innovator in interactive technology, KQED takes people of all ages on journeys of exploration — exposing them to new people, places and ideas.

What’s in Your Next Meal?

Are the benefits of genetically engineered food worth the risks?

New QUEST Television Special Premieres Wednesday, May 8, at 7:30pm on KQED 9.

KQED Contact: Sevda Eris, 415-553-2835, seris@kqed.org

San Francisco, CA – QUEST Northern California, KQED’s award-winning multimedia science series, investigates genetically engineered crops in a half-hour documentary special, Next Meal: Engineering Food, on Wednesday, May 8, at 7:30pm on KQED 9. Next Meal explores how genetically engineered crops are made, their pros and cons, and what the futureholds for research and regulations such as labeling in the wake of Proposition 37.

Proposition 37 would have required foods containing genetically engineered ingredients to be labeled in California. The measure narrowly lost at the ballot box last November, where it received 49 percent of the vote. But the initiative won in the Bay Area, where genetically engineered food remains a controversial issue, often reaching fever pitch. In this documentary, the KQED science team sought to carefully consider the promise of genetically engineered crops and the concerns surrounding them.

“This was a fascinating and difficult story to work on,” said Next Meal producer Gabriela Quirós. “There’s a lot of information and misinformation out there. For example, many people think that genetically engineered wheat is being grown in the United States, but that’s not the case. No genetically engineered wheat is being grown anywhere in the world. On the other hand, it was surprising to find out that nearly all the soybeans, corn, sugarbeets and cotton grown in the U.S. are engineered.”

The film takes the viewer on a journey to:

  • visit the labs of two Northern California biologists who are engineering crops that could alleviate malnutrition in developing countries and withstand climate change
  • learn the history of the first genetically engineered food to reach the market in 1994: a popular, yet short-lived tomato created in Davis
  • meet a farmer in Los Banos who is reaping economic benefits after switching from conventional to genetically engineered alfalfa
  • talk to a Marin County organic dairyman who has concerns that there may be health and environmental harm associated with genetically engineered crops, and who fears they could contaminate the organic hay he feeds his cows
  • hear from California anti-genetically engineered food activists and from Monsanto’s CEO.

Next Meal will air on PBS stations throughout California starting in May. Currently, stations airing the documentary include:  KOCE (PBS SoCal – Los Angeles and Orange County) Sunday, May 12, at 6:30pm; KVIE2 (Sacramento) Saturday, May 25, at 11:30pm; and KVCR (Los Angeles) Tuesday, May 28, at 10pm.

In October, KQED will air QUEST Northern California’s half-hour special on Lake Tahoe, examining its storied history, recent gains in the improvement of water clarity and emerging threats to its fragile environment – from climate change to invasive species to forest fires. KQED will also air a six-part, half-hour QUEST national television series exploring the science of sustainability. The series will take an in-depth look at the ways in which science is striving to make energy generation, water consumption and food production more sustainable in the face of climate change.

About QUEST

Launched in February 2007, QUEST is KQED’s largest multimedia project to date. Since its inception, QUEST has reached more than 60 million viewers and listeners through its traditional television and radio broadcasts and growing Web audience. QUEST’s ultimate aim is to raise science literacy by inspiring audiences to discover and explore the latest science and environmental news, trends and issues.  In September of 2012, QUEST received a prestigious grant of $2.5 million from the National Science Foundation to focus storytelling around sustainability science, and to expand its multimedia science reporting model to five additional public broadcasting stations across the country.  As a result, QUEST now includes QUEST Northern California(KQED, San Francisco), QUEST Nebraska (NET, Nebraska), QUEST North Carolina (UNC-TV, North Carolina), QUEST Northwest (KCTS 9, Seattle), QUEST Ohio (WVIZ, WCPN, Ideastream, Cleveland) and QUEST Wisconsin (WPR, WPT, ECB, ICS, Wisconsin).

QUEST Northern California is also now part of KQED Science, with more reporting on science and environment news and events from the Bay Area and beyond.  Funding for KQED’s science education and reporting is provided by the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Mary Van Voorhees Fund, the Follis Family Fund, the David B. Gold Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Wyncote Foundation, the Amgen Foundation and the George G. and Jeanette A. Stuart Charitable Trust, and the members of KQED.

About KQED

KQED serves the people of Northern California with a public-supported alternative to commercial media. Home to the most listened-to public radio station in the nation, one of the highest-rated public television services and an award-winning education program, and as a leader and innovator in interactive technology, KQED takes people of all ages on journeys of exploration — exposing them to new people, places and ideas.

2012 – A Year of Prestigious Awards for KQED’s QUEST Multimedia Science Series

Contact: Sevda Eris, 415-553-2835, seris@kqed.org

San Francisco, CA — QUEST, KQED’s multimedia science series, won several prestigious science reporting awards in 2012.

Most noteworthy, on November 14, QUEST won an American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Kavli Journalism Award for the second year in a row.  The winning television segment,Hetch Hetchy Aqueduct: Big Fixes for Big Quakes,” was produced by Sheraz Sadiq and investigated the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission’s $4.6 billion, decade-long construction project to overhaul the Hetch Hetchy water system which delivers water from the Hetch Hetchy reservoir in Yosemite National Park and five local reservoirs to 2.5 million residents in the Bay Area. Guy Gugliotta, a freelance science writer and former science writer for the Washington Post who helped judge the contest, called the KQED broadcast “a comprehensive look at the vulnerability of the water supply in the San Francisco Bay Area — something that should concern every resident.” He praised the “fascinating use of historical footage, outstanding engineering footage and graphics” to tell the tale.  The AAAS awards will be presented in conjunction with the 2013 AAAS Annual Meeting held at historic Fenway Park in Boston on February 15, 2013.

QUEST’s Hetch Hetchy television segment also won a Northern California Emmy Award on June 9 in the Informal/Instructional-Feature/Segment category. Complete credits for this segment are: Sheraz Sadiq, segment producer; Michael Goode, associate producer; Linda Peckham, editor; Amy Miller, series producer; Paul Rogers, managing editor.

QUEST also won two Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ), Northern California Chapter, Excellence in Journalism Awards on October 1 for two of its television segments.  “Airborne Wind Energy,” a segment exploring the potential of wind energy, produced by Christopher Bauer with Josh Cassidy associate producer, Amy Miller series producer and Paul Rogers managing editor, won in the Explanatory Journalism(TV/video non-daily) category.  “Millie Hughes-Fulford: Scientist in Space,” a segment produced by Gabriela Quiros that explores the potential human benefits derived from research conducted by the first woman to travel into space as a working scientist won in the Feature Storytelling (TV/video non-daily) category.   In addition, QUEST radio reporter Lauren Sommer  won an SPJ award for the multimedia series “Water and Power” in the Explanatory Journalism (multi-media-daily) category. The series explores the relationship between water and power and the policies required to manage both.  Other KQED radio staff also won SPJ awards for their contributions to this series. They include Dan Brekke, Craig Miller, Molly Samuel and Lisa Pickoff-White.

On December 27 Amy Standen radio reporter,  Andrea Kissack senior radio editor and Paul Rogers managing editor were also the recipients of the Radio -Television News Directors Association of Northern California Award in the “Feature Reporting – Serious” category for their report on “Diversity in Silicon Valley” which looks at a program called NewME, or New Media Entrepreneurship in Silicon Valley designed to encourage women and minorities to found technology companies.  The radio report interviewed seven participants from around the country who shared a house in San Francisco for three months, received coaching on their business plans and attempted to perfect the art of the pitch.

QUEST also  enjoyed the results of its multistation partner collaboration with an award for the “Best Online Video Series” from the BLUE Ocean Film Festival in Monterey (September 24-30) for its Science on the SPOT series. The winning online video entries featured two videos produced last year for the pilot phase of the QUEST Beyond Local project – Soundwaves: Listening to Orcas by KCTS 9 Seattle and Rendezvous with a Horseshoe Crab by WHYY Philadelphia. It also featured QUEST Northern California’s Marine Sanctuary Patrol Flight by KQED San Francisco.  Craig Rosa is Science on the SPOT’s senior interactive producer.

About QUEST:
Launched in February 2007, QUEST is KQED’s largest multimedia project to date. Since its inception, QUEST has reached more than 60 million viewers and listeners through its traditional television and radio broadcasts and growing Web audience. QUEST’s ultimate aim is to raise science literacy throughout the Bay Area and beyond, inspiring audiences to discover and explore the latest science and environmental news, trends and issues. In addition to continued support for QUEST from the National Science Foundation, funding for KQED’s science education and reporting is provided by the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Mary Van Voorhees Fund, the Follis Family Fund, the David B. Gold Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Wyncote Foundation, the Amgen Foundation and the George G. and Jeanette A. Stuart Charitable Trust, and the members of KQED.

About KQED:
KQED (kqed.org) has served Northern California for more than 50 years and is affiliated with NPR and PBS. KQED owns and operates public television stations KQED 9 (San Francisco/Bay Area), KQED Plus (San Jose/Bay Area) and KQET 25 (Watsonville/Monterey); KQED Public Radio (88.5 FM San Francisco and 89.3 FM Sacramento); the interactive platforms kqed.org and KQEDnews.org; and KQED Education. KQED Public Television is the producer of local and national series such as QUESTCheck, Please! Bay AreaThis Week in Northern CaliforniaTruly CA and Essential Pépin. KQED’s digital television stations include KQED 9, KQED Plus, KQED Life, KQED World, KQED Kids and KQED V-me, and are available 24/7 on Comcast. KQED Public Radio, home of Forum, KQED News and The California Report, is one of the most-listened-to public radio stations in the nation with an award-winning news and public affairs program service delivering more than eighteen local weekday newscasts and news features. KQED Interactive provides KQED’s cross-platform news service KQEDnews.org, as well as several popular local blogs, video and audio podcasts and a live radio stream at kqed.org. KQED Education brings the impact of KQED to thousands of teachers, students, parents and the general public through workshops, community screenings and multimedia resources.

 

 

KQED’s QUEST Science Series Expands Nationally with $2.5 Million National Science Foundation Grant

Grant will support a six-station public media science reporting collaborative 

Contact: Sevda Eris, 415-553-2835, seris@kqed.org

San Francisco, CA  — KQED, public media serving Northern California, has been awarded a $2.5 million grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) for a two-year collaborative multimedia science reporting initiative, QUEST Beyond Local. The grant will support KQED and five other public media organizations in creating content under the theme of “Science of Sustainability” on television, radio and the Web, along with educational assets and community outreach. KQED’s partner organizations collaborating on the project are: QUEST Nebraska (NET, Nebraska); QUEST North Carolina (UNC-TV, North Carolina); QUEST Northwest (KCTS 9, Seattle); QUEST Ohio (WVIZ Ideastream, Cleveland); and QUEST Wisconsin (WPT, WPR, ECB,ICS, Wisconsin).

QUEST Beyond Local is scheduled to launch in January.

QUEST began more than six years ago as an experiment in multimedia science journalism and education designed to deliver content and foster engagement using a range of media from television to smart phones and everything in between,” said John Boland, president of KQED. “It has been both a great success and a great learning experience, and we are grateful to the National Science Foundation for making it possible for KQED to share what we’ve learned with public broadcasters across the country for the benefit of their communities.”

The grant and project build on prior NSF funding and a nearly $1 million Corporation for Public Broadcasting grant awarded in April 2011 to KQED’s Emmy award-winning science and environment series, QUEST. That grant supported KQED’s efforts to work with partner media organizations to train producers on its multimedia science reporting model. The grant also enabled pilot productions of science and environment stories on television, radio and the Web with consistency in tone and style, while highlighting local science stories of interest for each partner’s community. The training included reporting guidelines for magazine-style television episodes; in-depth radio reports on environmental topics; the Web-only series Science on the SPOT, and Web extras like blog posts and photo slideshows.

QUEST recently enjoyed the results of this multistation collaboration with an award for the “Best Online Video Series” from the BLUE Ocean Film Festival in Monterey (September 24-27, 2012) for its Science on the SPOT series. The winning online video entries featured two videos produced last year for the pilot phase of the QUEST Beyond Local project – Soundwaves: Listening to Orcas by KCTS 9 Seattle and Rendezvous with a Horseshoe Crab by WHYY Philadelphia. It also featured QUEST Northern California’s Marine Sanctuary Patrol Flight by KQED San Francisco.

“We are pleased to see how QUEST, with its history of being organizationally and technologically innovative, is expanding its science reporting model,” said Valentine Kass, acting deputy division director in NSF’s Division of Research on Learning in Formal and Informal Settings. “QUEST Beyond Local builds new capacity in local and national media channels to address current science and environmental issues with local authority and national relevance.”

“We are delighted to partner with our public media colleagues in San Francisco and across the country on this important project,” said Maurice “Moss” Bresnahan, president and chief executive officer of KCTS 9 in Seattle. “The content we’ll create together is designed not only for general audiences but for classroom use as well, and we’re excited about the impact it will have on so many levels.”

The QUEST Beyond Local project will hire a new executive producer, a managing editor and a coordinating producer to lead the multistation collective in the production of:
• 18 science and environment stories for six 30-minute television broadcasts and Web distribution
• 18 Web companion pieces to television broadcasts (maps, photos, slideshows, more)
• 20 science and environment stories for radio broadcast and other distribution
• A 12-part Web video series
• Text reporting from community contributors
• Corresponding educational assets; educator training on using the assets
• Outreach, including community events, social media and public relations

QUEST Beyond Local will start broadcasting new content in the fall of 2013.

About QUEST:
Launched in February 2007, QUEST is KQED’s largest multimedia project to date. Since its inception, QUEST has reached more than 60 million viewers and listeners through its traditional television and radio broadcasts and growing Web audience. QUEST’s ultimate aim is to raise science literacy throughout the Bay Area and beyond, inspiring audiences to discover and explore the latest science and environmental news, trends and issues. In addition to continued support for QUEST from the National Science Foundation, funding for KQED’s science education and reporting is provided by the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Mary Van Voorhees Fund, the Follis Family Fund, the David B. Gold Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Wyncote Foundation, the Amgen Foundation and the George G. and Jeanette A. Stuart Charitable Trust, and the members of KQED.

About KQED:
KQED (kqed.org) has served Northern California for more than 50 years and is affiliated with NPR and PBS. KQED owns and operates public television stations KQED 9 (San Francisco/Bay Area), KQED Plus (San Jose/Bay Area) and KQET 25 (Watsonville/Monterey); KQED Public Radio (88.5 FM San Francisco and 89.3 FM Sacramento); the interactive platforms kqed.org and KQEDnews.org; and KQED Education. KQED Public Television is the producer of local and national series such as QUEST; Check, Please! Bay Area; This Week in Northern California; Truly CA; and Essential Pépin. KQED’s digital television stations include KQED 9, KQED Plus, KQED Life, KQED World, KQED Kids and KQED V-me, and are available 24/7 on Comcast. KQED Public Radio, home of Forum KQED News and The California Report, is one of the most-listened-to public radio stations in the nation with an award-winning news and public affairs program service delivering more than eighteen local weekday newscasts and news features. KQED Interactive provides KQED’s cross-platform news service, KQEDnews.org, as well as several popular local blogs, video and audio podcasts, and a live radio stream at kqed.org. KQED Education brings the impact of KQED to thousands of teachers, students, parents and the general public through workshops, community screenings and multimedia resources.

QUEST

Explore science, nature and environment stories from Northern California and beyond with KQED’s multimedia series

Latest News

KQED Continues In-depth Election Coverage with “Science At the Ballot Box”

A KQED NEWSROOM & QUEST television special airs on October 24 at 8pm and again on October 29 at 7:30pm on KQED 9.

Oct 17, 2014 | 0 comments | View Post

KQED Nominated for 14 Northern California Emmy® Awards

Productions honored include independent documentaries, science and news segments, and performing arts specials on KQED 9

May 09, 2014 | 0 comments | View Post

QUEST Premieres 100th Television Episode on April 2 at 7:30pm on KQED 9

Explore High-Tech Bikes, Hydrogen Cars, Wolves, Seed Diversity and De-extinction

Mar 13, 2014 | 0 comments | View Post

KQED Nominated for 17 Northern California EMMY® Awards

Local KQED productions honored include QUEST, This is Us, This Week in Northern California and the KQED/CIR special Heat and Harvest. Documentaries recognized include California State of Mind: The Legacy of Pat Brown, A Brush With the Tenderloin, Everyday Sunshine: The Story of Fishbone and Stage Left: A Story of Theater in San Francisco. KQED, […]

May 01, 2013 | 0 comments | View Post

What’s in Your Next Meal?

Are the benefits of genetically engineered food worth the risks? New QUEST Television Special Premieres Wednesday, May 8, at 7:30pm on KQED 9. KQED Contact: Sevda Eris, 415-553-2835, seris@kqed.org San Francisco, CA – QUEST Northern California, KQED’s award-winning multimedia science series, investigates genetically engineered crops in a half-hour documentary special, Next Meal: Engineering Food, on Wednesday, May […]

Apr 11, 2013 | 0 comments | View Post

2012 – A Year of Prestigious Awards for KQED’s QUEST Multimedia Science Series

Contact: Sevda Eris, 415-553-2835, seris@kqed.org San Francisco, CA — QUEST, KQED’s multimedia science series, won several prestigious science reporting awards in 2012. Most noteworthy, on November 14, QUEST won an American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Kavli Journalism Award for the second year in a row.  The winning television segment, “Hetch Hetchy Aqueduct: Big […]

Jan 16, 2013 | 0 comments | View Post

KQED’s QUEST Science Series Expands Nationally with $2.5 Million National Science Foundation Grant

Grant will support a six-station public media science reporting collaborative  Contact: Sevda Eris, 415-553-2835, seris@kqed.org San Francisco, CA  — KQED, public media serving Northern California, has been awarded a $2.5 million grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) for a two-year collaborative multimedia science reporting initiative, QUEST Beyond Local. The grant will support KQED and […]

Dec 13, 2012 | 0 comments | View Post

The California Academy of Sciences and KQED Break New Ground in the Future of Science Education, Develop First Multi-touch Science eBook From a Major Science Institution and Public Media

The Earthquake eBook created with Apple’s iBooks Author and the associated iTunes U course are the first materials to stem from such a collaboration. CAS Contact: Helen Taylor, 415.379.5128, htaylor@calacademy.org KQED Contact: Sevda Eris, 415-553-2835, seris@kqed.org             San Francisco, CA – Bringing together the expertise of California’s oldest science institution and Northern California’s largest […]

Sep 13, 2012 | 0 comments | View Post

QUEST- Back to Science, All New Television Episodes start September 12: See Cells in 3-D, Investigate Nuclear Energy, Discover Antarctica’s Seals and Hunt for Black Holes

  For Immediate Release: Contact: Sevda Eris Publicist-QUEST 415-553-2835 seris@kqed.org San Francisco — From the streets to the lab and from your own backyard to the far reaches of the planet and the depths of space, make new discoveries with QUEST, KQED’s multimedia science series, which begins new television episodes on Wednesday, September 12, at […]

Sep 07, 2012 | 0 comments | View Post

Get Ready to Soar and Squirm! QUEST Premieres Sixth Television Season with “Amateur Rocketeers and Edible Insects”

  For Immediate Release: Contact:  Sevda Eris Publicist-QUEST 415-553-2835 seris@kqed.org   QUEST Science Series Premieres Sixth Television Season with “Amateur Rocketeers and Edible Insects”  Wednesday, April 25, at 7:30pm on KQED 9 Public Television QUEST Radio Airs New Special Report on the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta Mondays May 7, 14, and 21 at 6:30am and 8:30am […]

Apr 04, 2012 | 0 comments | View Post