NY Mag Covers the West Egg-ification of San Francisco

| March 10, 2014 | 0 Comments
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Photo: NY Mag

Photo: NY Mag

Detroit in the 1940s. Wall Street in the 1980s. And now San Francisco. Kevin Roose of New York Magazine writes about what this succession means for our city, once known for its diversity instead of its raging class wars. Roose’s piece is part of a larger NY Mag series, which chronicles stories of those affected by evictions and other ripple effects of San Francisco’s tech boom (all are interesting, but Daniel Alarcón’s is a must-read).

All eyes, even those blinking over 2,000 miles away, are on the West Egg-ification of San Francisco (the red beacons of Sutro Tower can play the part of Daisy’s green light). Only time will tell if this story has a happier ending than Fitzgerald’s; until then, check out Roose’s piece below.


It’s hard to pinpoint the exact moment that San Francisco morphed into bizarro-world New York, when it went from being the city’s dorky, behoodied West Coast cousin to being, in many ways, more New York-ish than New York itself-its wealth more impressive, its infatuation with power and status more blinding.

Read more at: nymag.com

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About the Author ()

Emmanuel Hapsis studied creative writing at University of Maryland, College Park and went on to receive his MFA in the field from California College of the Arts. After a few years of odd jobs, he landed at KQED, where he worked his way up from an intern to being the lead producer of a literature podcast and then the creator and editor of KQED Pop. In his free time, he teaches yoga and sings his heart out at karaoke.