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A.M. Splash: 7 People Shot in Oakland on Sunday; Berkeley Considers Ditching Wells Fargo; Occupy Oakland, Bernal Heights, Petaluma

| February 6, 2012
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  • Seven shot Sunday afternoon in West Oakland and North Oakland (Oakland Tribune)

    Seven people were shot in Oakland on Sunday afternoon, including a woman holding a baby who was injured in a West Oakland shootout, police said. The shootings occurred just after 3 p.m., and all the victims are in stable condition, said Lt. Robert Chan.

  • Berkeley considers new banks to replace Wells Fargo (SF Chronicle)

    Saying they’re fed up with Wells Fargo’s corporate ethics, the Berkeley City Council this week took steps toward cutting ties with the banking giant and investing instead with smaller, local institutions…The city’s contract with Wells Fargo expires in December. In picking a new bank, the council wants an institution that doesn’t just offer safe financial practices – it must also have sound corporate ethics and hefty community investment, officials said.

  • Occupy Oakland protesters march against police again (Oakland Tribune)

    People spoke of peace at the latest Occupy Oakland gathering and march Saturday night, a week after more than 400 arrests, flag burnings, tear gas and chaos filled the same streets during the weekly anti-police protest.

  • Occupy Oakland Provides a Lens Into The Deep Dysfunction at OPD (Bay Citizen)

    (Occupy Oakland) has, since its inception, provided a lens less into the hypocrisy of the 1 percent than into the deep dysfunction of the beleaguered and depleted Oakland Police Department. While police were trying to control the Occupy movement over that weekend, police responded to at least five murders and more than 450 calls were made to 911. As the department faces the impending possibility of a federal takeover — the result of several missed deadlines in a nine-year court-ordered reform effort — showdowns with protesters have consumed the diminished force, leaving crime scenes and emergency calls unattended, protesters and agitators emboldened and a federal judge increasingly exasperated.

  • Occupy Bernal, Petaluma zero in on foreclosures (SF Chronicle)

    …The two homegrown Occupy groups exemplify new models springing up for the protest movement, even as they personify its message about economic inequality. Both are taking a hyper-local focus on an issue with national ramifications, while also lobbying for broad-based policy changes. Both rebut the frequent criticism that Occupy lacks goals and direction. As smaller, tight-knit, focused groups, they’re able to avoid the volatility of agitators who have caused some recent protests, notably those in Oakland, to veer into aggression and violence.

  • Parking meter rates, fines among highest in nation (SF Chronicle)

    San Francisco shares the top spot for the steepest parking meter fines in the United States and has the third-highest hourly parking rates for metered spaces.

  • Sergeant accused of hazing Santa Clara Marine goes to trial (SJ Mercury News)

    A second Marine is going to trial for allegedly hazing a fellow Marine who later fatally shot himself in Afghanistan. Sgt. Benjamin Johns has been charged with a wrongfully humiliating and demeaning Lance Cpl. Harry Lew, who killed himself on April 3. Johns, a squad leader, has also charged with dereliction for failing to supervise and ensure the welfare of Marines under his care.

  • Santa Clara County supervisors to consider $1.35 million in vouchers to house 100 chronically homeless (SJ Mercury News)

    (O)n Tuesday, the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors is poised to fund a $1.35 million subsidized housing program for 100 chronically homeless people — those who have been living more than a year on the street and have a disabling mental or physical condition. Many say the program will improve treatment for people such as Quinlan, and it should save taxpayer dollars.

  • Foreclosures at the high end increase across the Bay Area (SJ Mercury News)

    The housing crisis, which first devastated borrowers who purchased lower-cost homes with subprime loans, has caught up with people whose wealth helped them hang onto their houses longer. Throughout affluent communities in the Bay Area, million-dollar-and-up homes are increasingly being lost to foreclosure, or sold as a last resort for far less than their mortgages.

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Category: Morning Splash

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