21 Things That Will Be Obsolete by 2020

| March 2, 2011 | 434 Comments
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Flickr: Corey Leopold

Inspired by Sandy Speicher’s vision of the designed school day of the future, reader Shelly Blake-Plock shared his own predictions of that ideal day. How close are we to this? The post was written in December 2009, and Blake-Plock says he’s seeing some of these already beginning to come to fruition.

[Update: I asked Blake-Plock to respond to comments to this post. Read it here.]

By Shelly Blake-Plock

1. DESKS
The 21st century does not fit neatly into rows. Neither should your students. Allow the network-based concepts of flow, collaboration, and dynamism help you rearrange your room for authentic 21st century learning.

2. LANGUAGE LABS
Foreign language acquisition is only a smartphone away. Get rid of those clunky desktops and monitors and do something fun with that room.

3. COMPUTERS
Ok, so this is a trick answer. More precisely this one should read: ‘Our concept of what a computer is.’ Because computing is going mobile and over the next decade we’re going to see the full fury of individualized computing via handhelds come to the fore. Can’t wait.

4. HOMEWORK
The 21st century is a 24/7 environment. And the next decade is going to see the traditional temporal boundaries between home and school disappear. And despite whatever Secretary Duncan might say, we don’t need kids to ‘go to school’ more; we need them to ‘learn’ more. And this will be done 24/7 and on the move (see #3).

5. THE ROLE OF STANDARDIZED TESTS IN COLLEGE ADMISSIONS
The AP Exam is on its last legs. The SAT isn’t far behind. Over the next ten years, we will see Digital Portfolios replace test scores as the #1 factor in college admissions.

6. DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION AS A SIGN OF DISTINGUISHED TEACHER
The 21st century is customizable. In ten years, the teacher who hasn’t yet figured out how to use tech to personalize learning will be the teacher out of a job. Differentiation won’t make you ‘distinguished’; it’ll just be a natural part of your work.

7. FEAR OF WIKIPEDIA
Wikipedia is the greatest democratizing force in the world right now. If you are afraid of letting your students peruse it, it’s time you get over yourself.

8. PAPERBACKS
Books were nice. In ten years’ time, all reading will be via digital means. And yes, I know, you like the ‘feel’ of paper. Well, in ten years’ time you’ll hardly tell the difference as ‘paper’ itself becomes digitized.

9. ATTENDANCE OFFICES
Bio scans. ‘Nuff said.

10. LOCKERS
A coat-check, maybe.

11. I.T. DEPARTMENTS
Ok, so this is another trick answer. More subtly put: IT Departments as we currently know them. Cloud computing and a decade’s worth of increased wifi and satellite access will make some of the traditional roles of IT — software, security, and connectivity — a thing of the past. What will IT professionals do with all their free time? Innovate. Look to tech departments to instigate real change in the function of schools over the next twenty years.

12. CENTRALIZED INSTITUTIONS
School buildings are going to become ‘homebases’ of learning, not the institutions where all learning happens. Buildings will get smaller and greener, student and teacher schedules will change to allow less people on campus at any one time, and more teachers and students will be going out into their communities to engage in experiential learning.

13. ORGANIZATION OF EDUCATIONAL SERVICES BY GRADE
Education over the next ten years will become more individualized, leaving the bulk of grade-based learning in the past. Students will form peer groups by interest and these interest groups will petition for specialized learning. The structure of K-12 will be fundamentally altered.

14. EDUCATION SCHOOLS THAT FAIL TO INTEGRATE TECHNOLOGY
This is actually one that could occur over the next five years. Education Schools have to realize that if they are to remain relevant, they are going to have to demand that 21st century tech integration be modeled by the very professors who are supposed to be preparing our teachers.

15. PAID/OUTSOURCED PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
No one knows your school as well as you. With the power of a PLN (professional learning networks) in their back pockets, teachers will rise up to replace peripatetic professional development gurus as the source of schoolwide professional development programs. This is already happening.

16. CURRENT CURRICULAR NORMS
There is no reason why every student needs to take however many credits in the same course of study as every other student. The root of curricular change will be the shift in middle schools to a role as foundational content providers and high schools as places for specialized learning.

17. PARENT-TEACHER CONFERENCE NIGHT
Ongoing parent-teacher relations in virtual reality will make parent-teacher conference nights seem quaint. Over the next ten years, parents and teachers will become closer than ever as a result of virtual communication opportunities. And parents will drive schools to become ever more tech integrated.

18. TYPICAL CAFETERIA FOOD
Nutrition information + handhelds + cost comparison = the end of $3.00 bowls of microwaved mac and cheese. At least, I so hope so.

19. OUTSOURCED GRAPHIC DESIGN AND WEB DESIGN
You need a website/brochure/promo/etc.? Well, for goodness sake just let your kids do it. By the end of the decade — in the best of schools — they will be.

20. HIGH SCHOOL ALGEBRA 1
Within the decade, it will either become the norm to teach this course in middle school or we’ll have finally woken up to the fact that there’s no reason to give algebra weight over statistics and I.T. in high school for non-math majors (and they will have all taken it in middle school anyway).

21. PAPER
In ten years’ time, schools will decrease their paper consumption by no less than 90%. And the printing industry and the copier industry and the paper industry itself will either adjust or perish.

Read more in the School Day of the Future series.
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  • Pipper

    There will come a time when the rich will sit under a tree with their Socrates, and only their brains for company; the poor will be crowded into overcrowded schools and lessons to be left alone with a Kindle. The wealthy and educated know the game….

  • LRA

    They were saying things like this 50 years ago…meh

  • Fewwe

    Just wait and see.

  • Cashstrapped

    Much of the paper reduction will continue to be a result of cash – either the lack of, or replacement by ccredit/debit devices (integrated into smartphones, no doubt).

  • guest

    fuck “digitized” paper. books for life.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_JA6T52I3P2FQQGLBLZQBB4U3O4 Hmmmmm

    This is all a bunch of bull – people said this ten years ago and more. I mean seriously, people once thought in 2010 we’d be living in outer space, not using cars, flying everywhere and defying gravity. Are we anywhere close to that? Nope. P.s. It’s not that we’re afraid of Wikipedia – it’s a great source for tidbits of information but has no right in a research paper. We teach our students to use it and to accurately asses information to find flaws. Wikipedia isn’t fool-proof and a lot on it isn’t correct. Sadly, students think it’s fact without finding out if what their reading is true. Your list proves my point that Americans are becoming less intelligent with the influx of technology. Technology is a necessity, I teach it in school. But you got it all wrong.

    • Terry Elliott

      You certainly are sure of yourself. Almost as sure as the writers of the article. All wrong? bunch of bull? less intelligent? Is a comment section an appropriate place to speak this way? Perhaps it is the sound of your own voice that entrances you. Eventually, everything we know is wrong so please be useful. Something is bound to be obsolete in ten years. It is fun to guess. I would suspect that the writer would be the first to admit she might not know the future. Ease up,dude, and engage not enrage.

      • lite bleu

        Love your answer and adopt your advice – engage not enrage.

  • http://twitter.com/ryanbretag Ryan Bretag

    What is sad about a list like this is that we are projecting it for 2020 when many of these should have already been extinct and schools should be moving now on these. As a great leader I know says, “we continue to land” in education and when we land, we bury our feet so deep that moving us takes an act of Congress. Sad…

  • http://twitter.com/KyleAlbert Kyle Albert

    This list seems ill-thought out. Considering the massive budget crunches virtually all public schools in the US are in right now, to posit that by 2020 all desks will be gone and buildings will have become smaller and greener is ridiculous. Where’re all of these schools going to get the money to do this?

    I think it’s more important to focus on smaller changes that we can make to our schools to make the more relevant, rather than focusing on pipe dreams. As a high school senior, all of this stuff sounds fantastic — but it’s necessary to be realistic.

  • Adcom

    Are you seriously seeing these in schools in Oakland, East Palo Alto, Richmond, etc, in the next 10 years? I mean… really?

  • Brian

    This is a pretty realistic if you look back to where schools where 10 years ago. Sure schools and educators may have been thinking about these things for years, but we now how means to actually implement them. They’ve been wanting to digitize textbooks for 30 years, but not it is really physically and economically possible. The savings in eliminating the mounds of paper alone will help to pay for some of these new initiatives. I like the fear of wikipedia one and some on the comments here about it. Funny thing is, every so often (years back) Encyclopedia Britannica and others would put out a separate volume that just corrected the mistakes and ‘misprints’ found in each lengthy volume. Wikipedia allows us to fix these errors on the fly and is more immediate. If you could cite the encyclopedia, with all it’s misstated facts and misprints, you should be able to cite and use Wikipedia for research. So what if the info changes every minute. Eventually, the text bound encyclopedia changed it’s info with the next printed. You can cite the specific date/time of your Wikipedia page using the revision history links. Anyway, the list is pretty good and as a tech-in-ed integrator and parent of little ones, I’d love to see many of these come to fruition by the next decade. Prepare the students for the future, not your past.

  • Anonymous

    This is a great “wish list.” The reality, is the wealthiest Americans (approximately the richest 2% of all Americans) consistently push for lower taxes for themselves while taking an ax to severely slash Federal and State education budgets, keeping in their mantra of “Dumbing Down America.” For the wealthiest to rule the poorest, aka a Tyrannical Aristocracy. The disaffected Americans can (and should) use Twitter and Facebook, just as the Arab revolutionists have in these past few weeks, to fight for their educational rights.

  • Anonymous

    This is a great “wish list.” The reality, is the wealthiest Americans (approximately the richest 2% of all Americans) consistently push for lower taxes for themselves while taking an ax to severely slash Federal and State education budgets, keeping in their mantra of “Dumbing Down America.” For the wealthiest to rule the poorest, aka a Tyrannical Aristocracy. The disaffected Americans can (and should) use Twitter and Facebook, just as the Arab revolutionists have in these past few weeks, to fight for their educational rights.

    • Tgif

      Sorry if you are being kept down by the man. I think these are soem wonderful ways to get around the learning block known as teachers unions. Hurrah!

  • http://twitter.com/jbaldwin Jonathan Baldwin

    You had me up until number 19. Why not get them to do the plumbing, cleaning, accounts and the teaching while you’re at it?

    • Lee Smith

      Yeah, why not. #19 is totally in line with what schools should be working toward.

    • Boyle213

      Do you really think teaching trades in high school is a bad idea?

    • Keely

      Yep, I’m a student, and I “asses” information on Wikipedia all the time.

    • Keely

      Yep, I’m a student, and I “asses” information on Wikipedia all the time.

    • 20+ years in the classroom

      If a student is in a course on web design or graphic design #19 seems a natural fit. It also gives him/her real world experience to highlight for prospective employers. In fact in some schools, this already happens. By the way, at my school, students in Foods classes cater school and district events, the Furniture and Cabinet-making students have made podiums and shelves for classrooms. The Furniture students have also won national awards for design. And I encourage the students in my classes to teach and learn from each other, as well as from me. It is all part of good teaching and productive learning.

  • Curator

    Part of being a “curator” is giving H/t to sources – peeps catch on to this sort of thing. The Daily Riff is flattered by Tina’s follows. http://bit.ly/fEbRMr

  • http://www.bannerprintingshop.com/ Banner Printing

    In this article, I would agree on some that it will be obsolete on 2020. But not all on this list would be obsolete because there are still on this list would be available on 2020.

  • SFTor

    Tina needs to read “The Social Life Of Information” by John Seely Brown and Paul Duguid. Learning and competency exist in social contexts. Schools, classrooms, and workplaces provide a large part of that context.

  • Capn Gravy

    Well, the article does state it is a “wish” list…
    That said, one of the key components to making these innovations possible is access to high-speed Internet. This is fine for urban and suburban ares, but there are still many schools and households in our rural districts here in California that are still working with dial-up connections. When the schools go paperless and homework assignments are only online, where does that leave them?

  • Titus77

    I’m very doubtful about the ‘demise’ of books and paper. Students and schools have had the option to digitize printed materials for 2 decades and there’s nearly as much paper now as there ever was. Certainly the impact of ereaders and tablets will be huge, but a significant number will still want the book in their hands.

  • Real World

    Not one of these will come to pass, you are dreaming. Schools are regressing due to massive funding cuts (in favor of business tax breaks, like they need it mroe!) Go spend anytime in a school and you will see teachers without time to think, let alone set up individual learning centers! 10 years is nothing. Some of these in 50 years I might believe.

  • Wendy

    Great list! In today’s world, WHERE students learn is no longer defined by the walls and desks of the traditional classroom. For them, learning is no longer isolated from the world. Perhaps what we need to do is to shift our questioning from what to do with technology in our classrooms toward redesigning the relationship between school and what happens after school. As learning is moving more and more outside of the classroom and into our students’ technology rich, resource rich, connected lives, we need to help them make connections within and between these two environments to prepare them to become full participants in our society.

    New pedagogies, new students, new technologies, new literacies are in our midst – learning needs to be personalized, always on, engaging and authentic. We need to use the strategies and tools that address the new realities as we bridge the gap between the controlled learning of school and the connected and collaborative learning of our students’ lives – technology can be that bridge.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_PROR44UNMHB6YJ4VSSMMQAIFKE Vando

    I don’t see any of this for a very simple reason, all of the items on this list ignore a very basic part of schools, the students and the teachers. It doesn’t matter how much technology you sink into schools and how much money you put in school resources if kids don’t want to learn or can’t learn because you have teachers that can’t teach. How many kids do you know that would self teach themselves with a book? Then the ill side effects of things like computers in class rooms, is a illegible hand writing out of any and all students coming out of highschool/college. But I seem to be alone on this opinion.

    • Bridget C

      “How many kids do you know that would self teach themselves with a book?”

      Almost every homeschooled child I know actually. And I know quite a few. If you don’t make learning a boring repetitive task, kids actually love it and do it voluntarily. Honest, they do.

    • Banjoffheidi

      Vando- no longer can teachers be the “sage on the stage.” The apathy that has run rampant in education of late is disheartening. The quaint little classrooms with all students sitting in desks in rows and adoringly staring at their teacher in the front of the room has not existed since the 50′s. Priorities from parents do not include parents saying to their children, “sit in your seat, pay attention and DO NOT get in trouble at school or you will be in bigger trouble when your father gets home” .
      As a teacher in an inner city school district, parental priorities range from: will I have a job, will I be evicted today, is there enough food to feed my kids, do my benefits last me through the month…..
      Unfortunately, this is a reality in many areas of our country, not just inner city. Notice the priorities did not include anything about school. Most of our kids get at least 2 of their meals here at school so parents make sure they attend but do not put a priority on how the behavior is while the child is here. We have now instituted an after school program that includes a “snack” and transportation home this school year. As the teacher, I am the parent. The “parent” has become the concierge, if you will.
      I promise you, Vando, as a teacher and a parent, I will do my best to educate, using 21st Century Skills and Technology. all of my students and create a life long desire to learn through the skills and strategies I impart upon my students.

      • meep

        what happened to the good old days when teachers had no clue what a cellphone looked like and when people used to hang out at the milkshake bar and talk about boys…. stupid twitter

  • Prettyvacant

    I can tell you that a lot of teachers would love to see this stuff happen – but the people making comments about funding are correct, and there’s also the continued demands from politicians and parents for more standardized testing. That just sets up a system where we must treat students as buckets to be filled with facts or be branded bad teachers. We hate it, but it’s happening all over.

    Sadly, most people don’t want their children to pursue their own interests and self-educate; they’re afraid their kids will be left behind the ones who memorize the textbook, make top marks on tests, and can pay attention through a 75-minute lecture.

  • TUTTY

    The 22 Thing That Will Be Obsolete by 2020 = WE!

    • Gholden

      Ha…it is a common perception that teachers may be obsolete by 2020, but if that happened it would not be because mentors are not needed, but because they cannot be found. The challenge will be to find mature mentors who have moved their feet of clay from the 20th Century into the 21st. And this is perfect serendipidy, because the mentors needed will be those that can model life-long learning. The ground is shifting so fast that I cannot write a blog item without going back to revise it…my thinking has evolved while writing it. Imagine the challenge (and potential) for students who are relatively unencumbered with our intellectual and physiological baggage? Educators have faced and conquered many challenges in the past, but the one we face today is perhaps the greatest. It’s the student looking back at us from the mirror.

  • Goa

    lol

  • 21st Century Educator

    For you doubters out there, where will we be in education in 2020? If one assumes that we have reached a plateau in regards to these social needs, where does that leave the relevancy of public education?

  • Ntfdoc

    The thing that I can hardly wait to be obsolete is this totally inane list

  • Gholden

    Lol…there already. I work in a distributed learning school where the students have already learned about earthquakes in Japan by walking virtually through the ruins of Kobe and speaking to the survivors. They’ve learned about wildlife management issues by becoming wolves, ranging through Yellowstone National Park. They walk through arteries, eat, work, and live with the ancient inhabitants of Mesa Verde, learn about cartesian planes while participating in an archaeological dig, all virtually, and all for free. They are now rebuilding Egypt, Greece and Rome so they can teach others about these great civilizations. They are currently rebuilding a local retirement home where they can “give legs” to the immobile, “restore memories” through multimedia biographies, and allow distant relatives to visit. They’re just finishing rebuilding our school so students and parents can meet with teachers, get assignments, collaborate…there are no desks, no paper, no lockers, no fixed curriculum that fails to account for personal interests and passions. Parents could not be more pleased. There children have become 24/7 students of the world, digital jedis out to change the world. And I am just getting warmed up about what they can do! What are we lacking? Teachers with the passion and vision to join us.

    • Gholden

      “Their children….” Yes, I can spell too. Lol.

    • C Doig

      So where do you find things like the virtual walk of kobe? What are the resources/sites?

    • tjohare

      What is the name of your school? I would like to check it out. Thanks.

    • Banjoffheidi

      Please email me, banjoffheidi@elyriaschools.org. I would love to “chat” more about what you do and where you are, etc. I have just scratched the surface of what you describe and I would LOVE more ideas. It is obvious our “fight” to involve parents and make parents accountable for their childs behavior and attitude is failing. This is exactly the thing we need to eliminate the necessity of parental persuasion in the inner city/low-income schools.

    • Lteaman

      I, too, would like to know where you teach and I’d like to view your web site. Please reply to lteaman@vbschools.net. Thanks.

    • Seandkarlin

      Please give us more information! Where can we find you on-line?

    • Mayerk

      I, too, would love to know more. Our school is moving to a 1:1 model next year and would like to share your information with our faculty. I can be reached at mayerk@stcva.org

      • stevie

        1 to 1 is a badge, not better.  Show me single respected study that shows 1 to 1 is more effective than other environments. As a tech professional, I can see that 1 to 1 is often such a distraction, that learning actually decreases!  The race to technology by public schools is yet another example of how the system is broken and does not put the educational needs of children first.

    • TEACHer

      I’d like to think you exist, but you have yet to answer inquiries as to the what and where factor. I’m certain many of us would love to teach in such a school, but you need to prove you actually exist at this point. Waiting….

    • Gholden

      gholden@nides.bc.ca
      Skype= gord.holden (Canada)
      twitter = Nidester
      http://www.nides.bc.ca

      While I can tell you that much of what my students do is free, the implementation of a program like mine is not something that can just be “adopted.” There is a need for much planning and commitment. Working full-time, I don’t have a lot of time to set up individual teachers, but would be willing to work with/present to district personnel to get things happening. Let me know if you think your district is ready. I know the students are.

      • Bud

        From Gholden’s site:

        What do you need?
        - A fairly current computer
        - An internet connection
        - Discipline, determination and a will to succeed
        - A home facilitator who is present and can supervise the learning

        I’m sensing that the only way this works as a model is because of the last two points. Not saying it’s impossible, just saying the first two needs are way easier than the last two.

        • Gholden

          Yes, but in my experience, if you have the first 3 (along with some imagination and a desire to engage students in their learning), then the 4th one usually appears. And if not? Well, their “engaged” student likely won’t even notice. : )

    • Rickolbum

      This sounds really exciting. Is there a website or other contact point where I could get more information?

  • Tina Barseghian/MindShift

    Lots of issues to raised! I’ve asked the writer, Shelly Blake-Plock to respond to comments. Read it here:
    http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2011/03/a-challenge-to-doubters-do-something-impossible/

  • Anonymous

    Like most de-schooling notions, there lurks in the background questions of class, or more precisely the assumed perspective of a certain (upper) middle class. The question really is not whether these trends will occur, in some districts and locales they most certainly will. For others, the constraints of resources will continue, delaying the millennium.

    A more substantive question would be that of development, and the varied way children learn. In adolescence there is a rapid growth in maturity and learning abilities, but there also exists little evidence that the middle schooler is such a little adult that we can call that classwork covered. So, at least on the basics/specialized trend, I would vote no. In working with the age I see the students working through a variety of other issues, and while they may sometimes self-present as adults, as often there is still the child underneath.

  • JC

    The dictionaries in my classroom are from 1967, the high school hasn’t bought new text books since 1989, we just got phones in our room 3 years ago and my building doesn’t have heat.

    • Rochejc1859

      Just give it ten years. Then everything will be magically digitized and fantastic according to the 2021 educational utopia discussed in this article

  • Jefe1

    I agree. I cannot get my kids to put down their phones and am trying to figure out how to teach and give them my Spanish lesson plans via text message or twitter. I think as a good teacher we need to adapt and I know for sure in an innercity school we need to maintain aware and not become ridgid and stiff and stay where WE feel comfortable. AM I a tech geek?! NO. Are my students? …not really, but they are A LOT FAR AHEAD OF ME! So, I will run to catch up to keep up and maintain high expectations and learning!!!!! I agree with most of the list, at least in the urban classroom!

  • http://twitter.com/misterabrams misterabrams

    I read your article after finding it on Twitter. There are some major, heavily anchored concepts and paradigms of schools that will have to be broken before these changes can take place. Won’t it be wonderful when it happens? We should all try to imagine a time when students can have access to their “pocket computers” (smart phones) and perform research anytime they want. With that increase in access of information, imagine how the teaching would have to change! A movement away from facts and figures to creating and collaborating! Live the dream.

  • Everyman

    Recent technology has been a Curse, not a Savior. None of these changes you have listed will be good for humans – - just more and more people out of work, more isolation, more alienation. Viewed objectively, not a single recent technological change has been good for the peace and tranquility of human beings – - teenagers are being separated from their families by electronic devices, unbridled lies and propaganda being are dished out irresponsibly over the internet with no accountability, and power and control are being consolidated into the hands of the techie few. Electronic Media is alienating to the Human Spirit, and is bad for humans.

    • Gholden

      Yes, the invention of the telephone was the beginning of the end. People began to talk to disembodied phantoms in a netherworld, demons that separated people from their REAL friends, families, and associates. People’s world began to shrink…lol.

      A few years ago I had two sisters join my class that were so chronically shy that they did not respond to me for 6 weeks. Within 6 months of unintimidating, confidence-building, communication as an avatar, they had transformed to the point where you could almost call them “socially aggressive.” One of them joyfully announced to me that they had friends now…”300 of them in Australia!”

      My students (from the west coast of B.C.) are now slated to work with students on the east coast of the USA. My goal is to have them also working with other children who are Muslims from Saudi Arabia, Jews in Israel, and Hindus from India. Sure sounds like the beginning of the end of peace, relationships, and everything else we hold dear.

      And yes, now that we have families where both parents work, and many families are dysfunctional…children are indeed finding “family” elsewhere. While that has never ALWAYS been a good thing, it has always been a fact of life. Our challenge is not to stop them from doing this, or tearing down their means, but to address the reason for it. Time and effort much better spent methinks.

    • Ftechnology,bringonthe20s

      i completely agree! well said

    • Fds33fje

      HA! What a penetrating observation! Alienation, indifference, isolation, facebook (make the world a more open place by helping people connect and share), how ironic. Information flood is clouding wisdom, of which, wisdom, is the ultimate commander of every knowledge and technology there will ever be.

    • everyman’s everyman

      tell it to my family who spends all day playing words with friends with eachother while sitting in the same room, with except of my sister who is living on campus, its away for her to still feel connected to her family. get off the library computer and to back under the rock you came from

    • Guest

      No, it’s actually conservative idiots like you who are bad for humans (: the world is changing, old traditions are being re-examined and if you can’t accept that and start thinking for yourself – thus finding your find your place in the 21st Century – Natural Selection will take care of you …

  • Gholden

    Hmmm…so sorry that I didn’t respond earlier. I thought I would recieve notification if anyone responded to my post. Yes, I do indeed exist. If you wish to contact me it may be best by skype gord.holden (Canada). Tina has asked for an article, so I will be sharing here further details and the opportunities that exist for learning through immersive technology.

  • Gholden

    Have to chuckle about comments that suggest technology isolates people. Yes, of course some humans will gravitate toward activities that do isolate. One could argue that the hours of practise spent doing horseback riding, art, music, well the list is endless…involve much more isolation than not, but we do not attribute the world’s ills to these things.

    Training student-teachers in the Comox Valley (SD71), I would invariably be asked for the “short version” of what makes a great teacher. My response was 90% preparation, 90% relationship, and 20% are the intangibles. So, I find myself moving to North Island Distributed Education School, where I have students from across B.C. The relationship aspect is now GONE. And I AM a lousy teacher. Am I a lousy teacher now? I am 100% confident that none of my students (or their parents) would say so. Why? Because over the last 3 years I leveraged the technology that was available to bring students together with each other, and me. Many of these students have left classrooms because they either did not have the health or patience for the “peace and tranquility” they found there. Now, they have their tribe. They are my digital jedis, and you will find them working collaboratively with other students almost 24/7.

    Everyman, I do not blame you for your opinion. It has come from seeing the underbelly of technology. But there is another side. You will be moved and enlightened when you find it. I hope that the same passion that moved you to criticize will empower you to continue your journey. There is another view around the bend. : )

  • Ambicachi

    This is ridiculous. People always make the mistake of imagining too much change in too little time. 50 years? 100? Maybe then, desks in classrooms or books (largely) will be gone. But in 10 years? As long as all of the current teachers don’t suddenly drop dead in 9 years, there will STILL be a fear of wikipedia, still be grades, and frankly, there will still be those same teachers who (some) “ha[ve]n’t yet figured out how to use tech to personalize learning.”

  • Rochejc

    I’m sorry but this could be the 21 dumbest predictions Ive ever seen. You really think that in ten years paper will be obsolete, buildings will somehow decrease in size, all students in the country will be taking algebra in middle school, all parents will somehow learn to use technology, curriculum will be entirely revamped, bioscans will take attendence, etc. I actually laughed at this. I think that most of these won’t even be true in the next 50 years let alone 10. You probably believe that gasless flying cars will be the norm by 2015 too huh?

    • CindyB

      You are so right.

    • http://profiles.google.com/sathi.rmit10 Sathi Veerappan

      I think so. You are correct. It’s full of morning dreaming.

    • SeanR

      You must not be living in the same world as us because this is not crazy. Kids are learning more advanced things at much earlier ages. Algebra is being taught to middle schoolers. Parents in 10 years are teens right now. Those are technology based teens. They are not going to become technologically stupid when they become parents.

      Granted some things on this list will not come true in 10 years but most will come true and sooner than most think. You need to rethink what is going on in this world.

      • Fife

        This is post I wrote in response to PMStall.  I’m curious what you think of it given your words about Algebra in middle school.

        I completely agree with PMStall. Someone, anyone, find research that states
        the majority of kids (nationally or locally) below the age of 13/14 are
        developmentally ready for the abstract concepts in Algebra. Don’t bother
        trying because you won’t find any…Today and tomorrow there will
        be kids younger than 13/14 who are ready to master Algebra and good for them.
        But the vast majority of kids are not ready tomaster the concepts and skills
        of Algebra. Notice I write the word master; ifone wants to think of mastery
        in terms of typical grades than equate it with anA or B. So many students
        who take Algebra I now, earn a D or F and just passby. Or even earn C’s but
        their understanding is minimal at best.Unfortunately,initiatives
        like having a certain number of 8th graders in Algebra I and get credit (or
        pass) is complete nonsense. Students can earn low grades (D’s and even an F)
        and still pass. These type of initiatives are politically motivated, not
        what’s best practice in education. Unfortunately, the public is swayed
        by such information. When will most parents and pretty much all
        politicians realize learning something well is far better than just getting
        credit for it even if learning it well means taking a course one, two or even
        three yearslater.

    • teacher

      Head’s up……..We are a Los Angeles public low income school…..all our textbooks are online, all our tests are done online, every student has to do multiple PowerPoints a year, our gradebooks are online with parents logging in weekly, our students create yearly portfolios (some of which is digital), every teacher has a website, 90% of all students complete Algebra by the end of 8th grade, the combo home-school/independent online K-8 school operates out of an office at the local charter high school, and homework only counts for max 10% of a students grade (some classes, zero). It’s already here…

      • Michelle

        I am all for these changes, I would welcome them all.  But as a teacher in a rural area this is more then 10 years out for us, and I think quite a bit of schools.  For us I think it will need to be a shift of our parent mind set, we have online grading and websites, I would say less then 50% of parents use it.  My school is focused on the pluming and leaky roof, not bio scans.

      • Teacher in the real world

        Yeah right.  I’m a teacher and have gone to conferences with folks from LA and they would say you’re full of it.  Unless you’re a pampered little magnet school in which case your good fortune = less resources and good students for regular schools.  LA School District is a joke.

        • Dr. H

          I am a consultant with LACOE and “Teacher” is absolutely correct in their statements.  One of the benefits of being a “Low Income” district in LA is that there is a lot of special attention (read: money) given to the schools to increase outcomes.  This often results in a classroom far ahead of the ‘curve’ of your standard classroom.  You, obviously, have a grudge against what LA is offering to their students…. of you just don’t know what you’re talking about.  Maybe both.

          Dr. H.

        • Bstalk

          I am SO afraid to read that you are a teacher. I feel sorry for your students!

        • Eeskmstech

          I’m a computer lab teacher in a district that is not very advanced technology-wise.  However, I try to teach problem solving and not necessarily computer techniques as the technology they are using in my lab will certainly not be what is in their hands in the future.  Will the kids adapt?  Certainly.  We did.

          Why am I responding to your post in particular?  I’m teaching a unit on being respectful on-line and our feelings when we cyber bully or are cyber bullied.  I’m going to read the kids some of these posts and see what they think.  I’ll reply again after our discussion next week and post their opinions.

        • Anonymous

          “Teacher in the real world” = a.k.a. laid off teacher who hasn’t worked in a long time.  Obviously you know nothing about which you speak of.

      • student19

        But desks? what else would students sit in? bean bag chairs and futons? I know I’d fall asleep in class if that were the case. And paper? I sure can’t learn well using a computer all the time. Yeah it’s helpful, but writing down notes on paper helps me with memorization (plus you get to doodle on the pages)

        • 3lwood

          Students shouldn’t sit! They should be mobile and active. Sitting is dangerous to health. 

          • Gholden

            Indeed, our refurbished computer lab will not include chairs. They just get in the way of students flying around the lab, sharing, learning, teaching, collaborating. Much better for the body AND the mind! 

          • Dormangelo

            Quite, quite

          • Pickle

            Indeed good sir

          • Lisadu

            It pains me to see eight year olds sit for six hours a day and have restrictions on movement and speech because the teacher has mandated benchmarks. Movement in the classroom is so controlled that students sit for the classroom parties. It’s unnatural.

          • Lisadu

            It pains me to see eight year olds sit for six hours a day and have restrictions on movement and speech because the teacher has mandated benchmarks. Movement in the classroom is so controlled that students sit for the classroom parties. It’s unnatural.

          • elephant

            So is staring at a computer screen for hours a day!

        • Bobbyann56

          I have to say, bean bags and futons are a part of my small town school in AR and the students seem to be doing just great and not napping.  We also have I-pads, computers, laptops and I-pods on the way.  Maybe not all the students have the same technology, but the goal is to have some type of technology in all students’ hands during some part of the learning day.  We also use less paper than two years ago, notes are made for note taking apps and such.

      • Jkoerschen

        Power points? How 20th century is that.

      • Fife

        This is post I wrote in response to PMStall. I’m curious what you think of it given your words about Algebra in middle school.I completely agree with PMStall. Someone, anyone, find research that states the majority of kids (nationally or locally) below the age of 13/14 are developmentally ready for the abstract concepts in Algebra. Don’t bother trying because you won’t find any…

        Today and tomorrow there will be kids younger than 13/14 who are ready to master Algebra and good for them.  But the vast majority of kids are not ready tomaster the concepts and skills of Algebra. Notice I write the word master; ifone wants to think of mastery in terms of typical grades than equate it with anA or B. So many students who take Algebra I now, earn a D or F and just passby. Or even earn C’s but their understanding is minimal at best.  And consider this, how many students have to take remedial courses to “refresh” their memories with basic skills and basic Algebra concepts because by the time they get to 11th and 12th grade, they have forgotten most everything.

        Unfortunately,initiatives like having a certain number of 8th graders in Algebra I and get credit (or pass) is complete nonsense. Students can earn low grades (D’s and even an F) and still pass. These type of initiatives are politically motivated, not what’s best practice in education. Unfortunately, the public is swayed by such information. When will most parents and pretty much all politicians realize learning something well is far better than just getting credit for it even if learning it well means taking a course one, two or even three yearslater.     

      • B. B. Bennett

        Yeah, that’s nice, but what’s the background on all of this technical improvement? If your school is low income, where’s the money coming from to pay for this stuff? Is it a grant, or some special “because you’re a low income school” program? We can barely get voters to pay for the old fashioned schools so I don’t know what it will take to implement your school’s experience statewide.

        As to PowerPoints  I am sorry but I’m unimpressed. So what? Quantity versus quality: merely having them do the presentation with a computer instead of poster board doesn’t mean that they learn any more than they otherwise would.

        As for algebra, completion isn’t mastery; it’s simply getting a passing grade on the days of the tests. We both know that the battle is still raging about at what age children are developmentally ready to embrace algebra without crying. The more likely scenario is for it to be broken up into bite-sized bits and spread out over several grades, from primary to secondary, perhaps even discarding it as a discrete study and mixing it in with geometry and the rest with the focus being on “here’s the problem, how do we solve it”.

        Homework goes back and forth like a bad joke. Now it’s good for you, now it’s not. Stay tuned.

        My real question is this: If we’re saying that you need a college diploma to succeed in this brave new world, that a high school diploma just isn’t cutting it, then why does the education process essentially stop at age 12 for the vast bulk of students? When are we going to re-evaluate the entire school experience, from curriculum, to schedules, and and to breadth?

      • B. B. Bennett

        Yeah, that’s nice, but what’s the background on all of this technical improvement? If your school is low income, where’s the money coming from to pay for this stuff? Is it a grant, or some special “because you’re a low income school” program? We can barely get voters to pay for the old fashioned schools so I don’t know what it will take to implement your school’s experience statewide.

        As to PowerPoints  I am sorry but I’m unimpressed. So what? Quantity versus quality: merely having them do the presentation with a computer instead of poster board doesn’t mean that they learn any more than they otherwise would.

        As for algebra, completion isn’t mastery; it’s simply getting a passing grade on the days of the tests. We both know that the battle is still raging about at what age children are developmentally ready to embrace algebra without crying. The more likely scenario is for it to be broken up into bite-sized bits and spread out over several grades, from primary to secondary, perhaps even discarding it as a discrete study and mixing it in with geometry and the rest with the focus being on “here’s the problem, how do we solve it”.

        Homework goes back and forth like a bad joke. Now it’s good for you, now it’s not. Stay tuned.

        My real question is this: If we’re saying that you need a college diploma to succeed in this brave new world, that a high school diploma just isn’t cutting it, then why does the education process essentially stop at age 12 for the vast bulk of students? When are we going to re-evaluate the entire school experience, from curriculum, to schedules, and and to breadth?

      • Cliff Hemple

        Looks like grammar has disappeared from teacher skills too.

    • Geniemyo

      As a children’s book author and illustrator working on her first book, I don’t think books will be obsolete, and not within 10 years. I suffer from conjunctivitis and computer eye strain, so reading from a kindle may be a challenge for me. I like the printed word on paper and plan to try to donate to organizations that plant trees.

      • Gholden

        Yes, my books fill every nook of my house. Even the ones I’ll never read will likely have a home with me until I’m shuffled off to an old-age home, or my house erupts in flames. Similarly, I drive a vehicle I cannot see the sense in parting with. It has no radio, sound system, or air conditioning. The heating and defrosting system leave a lot to be desired. Well, let’s just say that it’s likely a safe bet that very few budding children’s book authors would be willing to trade down to my old rust-bucket. But as obsolete as you may consider it to be, as long as it transports, I feel little need to purchase a vehicle that does more things, better.
        My first teaching job required me to teach about Peru from a book. I couldn’t wait for my wife (who had lived throughout Peru) to read it so I could gain further insights from her. She laughed as she read it. It turns out that the text book was poor fiction. Peru was described the way our (Canadian) government could describe Peru without running the threat of displeasing the Peruvian officials that influenced diplomacy and trade. My students didn’t get a text book that term, they got the truth. Today, they would be Skyping with various Peruvian students to find out what life was like in Peru. My wife’s experiences from 20 years ago, so much more valid that the 30 year old text books, is no longer valid either.
        But what of fiction? My favourite children’s books are the Chronicles of Narnia. I’ve taught the entire series to every class I’ve taught for the last 18 years. How stimulating to read about children going through a wardrobe into another world. Now, my students travel through an arch of wisdom in Quest Atlantis. They venture with other (real) children into virtual worlds where they not only walk amongst the citizens of ancient and alien civilizations, they also learn from them, and influence their story by the decisions they make. Together, they solve problems on the moon, save rhinos from extinction, encounter mysterious fish kills, and are now building their own virtual worlds with which to tell their stories. And this is just the beginning. I haven’t begun to talk about the growth of augmented reality, where stories come alive in 3 dimensions before one’s eyes.
        Like my vehicle, books are not only obsolete, so is the kindle. The marketplace is simply taking its time catching up to vehicles for fact and fiction that do more. And who is leading the charge? The digital natives we call children. While I do not see print being totally supplanted in the near future as a valid means of transmitting information, the printed word is quickly losing its prominence as the medium of choice. No one has suggested that people burn their books. By all means, cling to whatever works for you. Just don’t make the mistake of thinking that what works for you is what others will be choosing 10 years from now. If you do, well, I have this car that might interest you….

        • Theresa

          Please tell me you aren’t serious.  Yes, kids (and even adults) will choose a computer/video game or a movie over a book, but that doesn’t mean that we as parents/teachers/mentors should encourage it.  My toddler will pick cookies over vegetables any day of the week, but I still serve her healthy foods first and foremost.  The printed word forces children to use their imaginations to fill in the gaps and images that are being described.  A virtual reality system, computer game or movie might allow the transmission of information, but it will be at the cost of children’s imaginations.  If our children lose the ability to imagine, they will also lose the ability to solve problems creatively and come up with those very stories and games that you are holding up as the future.  Kids (and adults) should be encouraged to explore the printed word and use it as a jumping off point for their imaginations, not allowed to slip into the easier world of video games where someone else does their thinking for them.

          • Gholden

            Good grief. Please try to open your mind to the fact that what you may be calling cookies is the new super vegetable that does all the things you ascribe to books much, much better. Parents are wanting to have their children in my program because of how their imagination has been set on fire. Last week, one of my students just won the major filming award for Canadian students, not for an assignment, but something he put together simply BECAUSE of the important and inspirational work he was doing in a virtual world. Below I am trying to insert just a few of the comments of parents whose children’s imaginations and academic abilities have been transformed. This didn’t happen because we stopped using books, but because we replaced them with something better. Corn is a vegetable, but your really shouldn’t live on it. Until you research and experience this area in more detail, I hope you will keep an open mind towards change. The genre of books that you value so highly for your children were NOT easily accepted into publishing and education. Look it up. Their acceptance took a long time. Let’s hope we don’t make the same mistake with this generation. It would be their loss.

             

      • Damfino

        I agree books will not be obsolete in 10 years, but one can’t deny that the popularity of the printed book is being challenged by eReaders.

        Reading from a Kindle would not be any more of a challenge for you than reading from a regular book. The fact that you don’t know that proves to me that you’ve never looked at a Kindle.

        • excited

          Yes, i concur.  I think a school district should try and team up with Amazon and Google, and see if they can’t get all their students Kindle Fires, and Apps made exactly to help kids learn Algebra (for example). Remind them how to foil, and so on.  Imagine no more backpacks!  I am very excited for the next generation, and the limitless possibilities that technology is unlocking.   

        • excited

          Yes, i concur.  I think a school district should try and team up with Amazon and Google, and see if they can’t get all their students Kindle Fires, and Apps made exactly to help kids learn Algebra (for example). Remind them how to foil, and so on.  Imagine no more backpacks!  I am very excited for the next generation, and the limitless possibilities that technology is unlocking.   

    • whudduppp

      i took algebra in middle school circa 2001 :) and that wasn’t advanced placement

      • Babz

        Me too. But in 1986! Yes, Algebra in the 8th grade.

        • Emurff

          Me too… in 7th grade in 1974.

          • Pie

            Me too…7th grade in 2007, with weight. Very difficult to grasp at the time.

    • Josh

      Come on. Do you not realize that you sound like my 80 year old granny? A lot of people said we would never walk on the moon as well.  “Change is inevitable, except change from a vending machine.” If it doesn’t change then we are in a world of hurt.”Man cannot discover new oceans unless he has the courage to lose sight of the shore” – Andre Gide.

    • guest

      I took Algebra in middle school 20 years ago, as did half of my peers.  I also over the last decade of teaching in NJ have seen many of these predictions begin to make an appearance.  Technology changing the classroom and instruction, increased parent communication, digital attendance, and teachers becoming their own source of Pro. Dev. all happened in the last 4 years in the district I taught in.  Like it or not education is changing.

    • Mlknight

      i completely agree with Rochejc! i mean in like the 80′s ppl were predicting us to be traveling back and forth to the moon, PUBLICLY, for vacations and living! i have no doubt that is exactly what is happening again, they’re just getting cocky and full of them selves thinking that since we’re so advanced now, everything in story book will come true in no time.

      it’s ridiculous.

    • Ryan

       I currently teach in a school in which paper is almost obsolete.  I just starter using a text book a week ago.  Not because I had to, but because reading a text is a skill my students might need in the future.  But then again, maybe they won’t need that skill.

  • Gholden

    I think there’s something that many are missing on this thread that is confusing the issue. The question is will these 21 things be “obsolete” in 2020. If the question was “Will these 21 things be GONE by 2020?” then I would have to agree with all those that say no. Public schools will still be underfunded, and there will always be private schools that will cater to those wanting a 19th century model of education for their children, and teachers who prefer to teach that way whether people want it or not. I still use an overhead projector when doing face to face teaching since it affords me the opportunity to gage student engagement to classroom instruction. I could set up a smart board tomorrow with Wii components to go with the software available, but I won’t. Is there something better than an overhead that would give me the same utility? Yes. Overhead projectors are obsolete, like my vehicle, my floppy drives, my t.v., well I think you get the point. Are things that are obsolete still useful? Yes. In fact, buying a 1992 Toyota creates less of a carbon footprint than buying a new electric hybrid. I think the debate needs to be more about teachnology than technology. It’s not so much the technology that should be at issue in 21st century education, but whether or not we are teaching in ways that meet the needs of a 21st century learner. How do we do that? Personally, I love it when I find a bored student For it’s in the eradication of their boredom that my teaching practice is lifted to new heights. It’s not the furniture that’s the issue…it’s the students’ learning. Find what works for them, and go with it. JMHO.

    • Kelli

      The first line of your post “I think there’s something that many are missing on this thread that is confusing the issue” says a lot. While I agree that technology opens endless doors for students, it is not a replacement for actual human contact or hands-on learning. Given the choice, my students would choose an actual archaelogical dig over a virtual one. They would choose to observe the actual life cycle of a butterfly over a virtual one. They would choose to be out helping in our actual community, not a virtual one. Don’t get me wrong – I LOVE what technology has done to enhance my teaching and the learning experiences of my students, and I am certainly not afraid of hand helds in my classroom. However, technology does not teach students empathy, social justice or the importance of being an active citizen who contributes to our community, locally and globally.

      • Gholden

        Yes indeed Kelli, my students would likely prefer the live experience of sharing in a meal prepared by the Mesa Verde people of 300 years ago. They would love to learn more about wolves by actually running and hunting with a pack as well. Walking through the actual ruins of Kobe, Japan would certainly help them to better appreciate what it’s like to go through a devastating earthquake. I’d also love the chance to visit a space station and do research on an asteroid headed for Earth, but alas, they have to settle for doing these things, and many other similar fieldtrips virtually. If it were safe, affordable, or possible to do these “for real” we would, in a heartbeat. But to suggest that doing these things virtually is a poor cousin to observing the virtual lifecycle of a butterfly is mixing apples and oranges. You also say that “technology does not teach students empathy, social justice or the importance of being an active citizen who contributes to our community, locally and globally.” Well, this statement is proof positive that you have not experienced Quest Atlantis. While I would have considered such a statement to be pretty reasonable 3 years ago, I now know that this is far from true. Try out Quest Atlantis for a month and you will soon understand why I, and anyone who has used it, will disagree whole-heartedly with your statement. Please note, I am not suggesting that empathy and citizenship cannot be taught in real life (lol), of course it can. Like you, I have experienced that. I’m only saying that it can also be done effectively virtually because I have had the opportunity to experience and witness that along with thousands of other teachers. It is of course always advisable to speak from a position of experience rather than one that represents what you suppose to be true.

  • Kenny

    I think this is a bit unrealistic. Maybe by 2030, but assuming the economy continues at this pace, the U.S. nor the rest of the world could afford to do something like this. We likely won’t have the money to give to schools so they can do this until 2016-17 which would allow only 4-3 years to make that change. And even then, technology is expensive and expecting schools to pay for it in that time is unrealistic. And then you have to consider parents and how they would react to this change. What if they are against some of these ideas? What if the students are?

  • Wdossett

    Maybe a few of these will happen, but if we learn one thing in history class is that change at the governmental and major institutional levels are agonizingly slow. I won’t see this flexible a school system for a while.

  • CindyB

    It won’t be this drastic, no matter what we hope, or think.

  • Dan in CO

    Some people enjoy being more isolated than others. It is unfortunate that extroverts like yourself are unable to imagine that there are people on this earth who don’t relax by making small talk and that being alone is not a sad or solemn event, but a relaxing experience that allows us to hear ourselves think and not be constantly drowning in other peoples thoughtless drivel.

    The future is here. Learn to embrace it or die a bitter old man.

  • Beth

    This is ridiculously dumb. No, these things will not change like you’ve stated.

    1. people need something to put their shit on in class, the office, etc… that would be a desk.
    2. I have an app on my phone for french/english translations, but that’s not the same as learning it. It’s more of a check for certain words. Language labs have been a proven method to actually learn a language. Technology doesn’t magically allow you to know something; it facilitates your learning.
    3. Yes, my phone is super awesome. It’s compact, portable, and useful. However, I would hate having it be my primary access to the internet and other documents. Why? Well I’m guessing you didn’t write this article on your phone. Not because you can’t, but since it’s a pain in the ass.
    4. Our goal with education has always been to learn things. Homework is what students do to accomplish that goal while their outside of school, because teachers aren’t constantly available.
    5. Not everyone who goes to school in the US is from the US. Schools accommodate the different backgrounds of applicants through a standardized test. I agree, it isn’t the best way of assessing a student’s capabilities, but it does allow universities to compare entrants. Changing that to a digital portfolio would needlessly disadvantage anyone outside of the US (which, BTW, schools wouldn’t want), since it would require a high school class. Also, although some teenagers accomplish great things, most don’t have anything truly worthy of a portfolio. Unless you’re going to a specialized field, like art (which, BTW, already requires you to have a portfolio), you’re going to university to learn more and figure out what you want to specialize in.
    6. Technology is great. It really can be used to help people learn more, since we have greater access to a huge amount of resources. Also, we can communicate so much easier than past generations. However, not all subjects require the latest technology. In fact, as a college student, I hate when professors add needless trends to the curriculum just to stay “hip.” Seriously, we don’t need to tweet you about current events or start a blog about recent items on the syllabus. Don’t fix what works.
    7. People haven’t “feared” wikipedia in a long, long time. Just don’t cite it as a reference. Why? Well, if the info is correct, you should easily be able to find a more in depth article that confirms that knowledge. Hell… you can even just look at the article cited on the wiki page. Primary sources are always better, since the information has fewer filters.
    9. Most classes at university don’t have attendance sheets, so this is kind of a moot point, except humanities classes. Why? because the point there is to actually discuss the information and bounce ideas off of each other. Even in your creative, technological idyll, face to face is still arguably the best way in which to do this. If people don’t show up, they aren’t pulling their weight (i.e. sharing their views). The same goes for the modern workplace.

    I skimmed the remaining answers, but 19 really stood out to me. Because…

    19. You don’t think your kids should be spending more time continuing to learn? Yes, they can do all of this stuff, but half the job is the creative input which takes time. Time you might want to spend letting your kid finish school or having a life.

    Some of these may be true, but your list is extremely flawed. You don’t seem to really appreciate *why* these things are useful and are instead blinded by the possibility that we can do without them. Just because you *can* do something doesn’t mean it’s the best way to accomplish your goal. Homework exists because students DON’T learn on their own. Paper exists because people can’t all AFFORD personal computers

  • Alexanderfindlater

    A rare miss for stumble upon…

  • Gholden

    OMG.Humanity not only has a 24/7 presence in (outer) space, there is exponential growth in the numbers that inhabit virtual space for business, socializing, entertainment, and yes…education. How devastating that so many teachers seem unable to imagine how they might leverage the hand-held devices being brought to class that are many times more powerful than the computers that put man on the moon.
    America already has metal detectors screening elementary students. Bioscans are probably only a few more tragedies away (and a welcome addition to the Homeland Security arsenal.) Flying cars…old technology. Gasless trains have been sailing around the orient for a decade. Whining about needing dictionaries or atlases? (Good grief!) Parents learning technology in 10 years? YOUR STUDENTS will be the parents in 10 years! Yep, I still use a desktop, but it’s on my computer because paper will be banished from my school next year. My students will be consolidating their French lessons next year by meeting French students in a virtual French restaurant over lunch and conversing via Skype (voice and texting). They will be on mixed teams, competing against each other in virtual math games.
    You see, the $700,000 just cut from our school budget this year means stepping up to the plate and adopting pedagogies and methodologies that are not only 21st century, but cost effective. Yes, we may be headed back to a Socratic academy, but one in which the walks are not confined by space, time, or ignorance. It’s here now, but only those who have the eyes to see and the ears to hear will embrace it. The rest will do what they can to cling to denial, negativity, and excuses. C’est la vie.

  • Carena586

    Honestly, The only things I think that might/should come form this are algbra in middle school and a lack of a fear tward Wikipedia. Hopefuly.

  • Anonymous

    This is amazingly stupid. Computers for instance, Only hipsters use iPads and whatnot fulltime. I hate touch stuff, everything takes longer time, even typing, and the “internet browsing” experience, isent much better. And what do you think are going to happen with PC gamers? Are they all gonna vaporize? I.T. Departments will always be needed as people dont suddenly involve into supreme beings that understand everything right away.

    Web design done by kids? I’d like to see the security on that. Or how it looks. Of course, they will be making them by template since kids on suddenly understand code easilier.

    The most annoying thing is how you imagine the school. I’m in schol now. Everyone has computers and are allowed to walk where they please at times. This becomes a nuisance as noone even bothers to really learn something. The computer is just distracting. I want back to high school where we used paper and pen, and had no choice but to draw or listen to the teacher.

    This is the future imagined by a consumer, not minding that these language labs on smartphones must first be made in said labs. Its like saying all farmers dont need to milk any cows anymore, they now sell milk in the store.

    Seriously, this list made me irritated.

    • Gholden

      And spelchekers? Wots wit that? Their just anoying two! : )

    • Asylum

      While I don’t necessarily agree with all the items on this list, I find it interesting as a point of discussion. What I don’t find helpful is that several posters feel the need to make disparaging remarks about the list (“amazingly stupid”) or the author. I certainly hope that those people who feel the need to diss rather than discuss are NOT teachers. God forbid they’re passing that attitude on to kids.

      It is also interesting that many of the posters claim that technology will isolate but seem to neglect the fact that they are participating in a global conversation themselves just by posting.

    • Aminhotep

      Farmers dont milk cows anymore. Its done in massive industrial facilities like everything else.

  • Like500ninjas

    Whoever wrote this is fucking retarded.

    • Anonymous

      Delete.

  • http://twitter.com/teetee_izzymine Call me Tash

    I think some of these accusations may possibly become true, considering the fact technology enhances every single day. Its starting to get scary that technology involves everything that we do on a daily basis.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Stephen-Dragun/1175961041 Stephen Dragun

    I’m young, and these predictions of the future are depressing. It’s like the more we become technologically “advanced”, the more we become backward in other aspects of human life: loneliness is at an all time high. why? because people plug into personal devices and never talk. sure, Facebook helps alot of people make friends, but for alot of others, it leaves them lonely and disconnected from going outside, meeting in a park, playing ball, etc.

    and I don’t care if digital paper will feel like paper. I own a nook, and I still prefer paper. why? because I prefer the ancient medium. I don’t need a bunch of impersonal, consumer-based technology. what’s wrong with a book?

    • Gholden

      Good grief. Someone who likes to curl up with a good book is going to pontificate on how virtual education isolates people socially. Being on this thread is a lot like reading the novel “Alice in Wonderland.” It just get “curiouser and curiouser.”
      One of my favourite novels for children is “The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe.” Those who read it have their imagination guided into a world on the other side of the wardrobe, where animals talk and children act a prescribed way. The process of going through this novel (and the 5 others that follow) is a passive and isolating activity. Doing Quest Atlantis, my students don’t just read about an epic story, they become an active part of the story. Rather than walking through a wardrobe, they teleport to a wide variety of worlds, cultures, places, adventures, which they participate in and shape in concert with dozens (if not hundreds) of children from around the world. Children who spent their lunch hours hiding from bullies, make hundreds of friends and learn social behaviours online that transform their personal view of themselves and others, and translate into the confidence and self-assurance they need to make friends in the “real world.” (lol)
      My students do not spend wasted hours with lessons they’ve heard before being repeated for the ones who did not get it. They go through curriculum at their own pace, and accomplish more in 3 hours than most students do in 6 hours in non-immersive schooling. This last week, 3 of my students each won numerous medals in alpine skiing events. Four of my students participated in a regional robotics competition (which they won). One student won her 4H speaking competition, while several others participated in hockey tournaments, swimming competitions, etc., etc., etc. You see, these students have MORE social vistas opened up to them BECAUSE of their 21st Century education. I could go on and on about that, but it would be pointless. Someone who is reclusive will find the excuse to remain so whether it be in technology or a book. Don’t blame the medium! I’d speak more to this, but I have two friends from down in the U.S. who are right now waiting for us to share thoughts on Skype. Damn, wish I wasn’t so darn isolated by technology. (lol.)

  • Anonymous

    vipshopper.us

  • guest

    I think you seriously overestimate the speed of change in the US educational system. I currently have 3 student computers that I have been unable to use for the past two years because our IT department cannot get them to all consistently work at the same time. Change is expensive… new technology is expensive, and with the state of the economy and decrease in school funding I don’t see most of these things happening in the next 10 years (except for the cooperative learning groups and differentiation being a part of the job description).

    • Gholden

      Too passionate perhaps, but not too optimistic. Thirty years ago I had 10 students who needed computers in order to catch up to their grade level in reading. There was no IT department, there was no budget for computers that cost a lot more than they do now. I opened up the phone book and started calling businesses to see if any would sponsor a computer for a student. I contacted the local college to see if they had any student programmers that would write the programs that didn’t exist yet. When I had 10 computers and a great reading program for my students the phoning stopped and the learning began. I guess I didn’t know any better. Still don’t, just do whatever I have to in order to get my job done.
      If you were to look at the resources I suggested, you would discover that that the best ones are free. The only cost is in the time it takes for a teacher to obtain them, and use them. Sorry, I get the sense that most here want some sympathy. I’ve written as much as I have because you have my sympathy. It’s an emotion that usually compels one to make an effort to help. I think the question that must be asked now though is how much sympathy do you have for your students? Enough to look for solutions rather than excuses. I know these are hard words, and not a question I want to ask. Times are tough, but if you care enough about your students you may need to be tougher, smarter, and more determined than ever to never give up. What gives me the right to say this? Well, it’s advice I took myself. If that’s not good enough for you, nothing ever will be. If that’s the case, my kindest advice to you is that if you are unable or unwilling to overcome the obstacles before you in teaching, move on to an easier challenge and make room for someone still willing to try.

  • Alice Webb

    Good article. I can see most of this happening although the ‘professional learing networks’ in #15 shows me technology doesn’t always insure perfection.

  • Cmnelson

    You are being way too optimistic.

  • Aredd1628

    I don’t think many of the negative commentators realize that the high-schoolers, middle-schoolers, and even the 2nd and 3rd graders will all be adults in 2020. Todays high-school graduates will be in their late 20′s and almost 30 by that time. Now, some these things are somewhat unrealistic due to people’s tendencies to hang on to what they know, but the generation that is already familiar with technology will be the driving force, the new parents, the new teachers, etc. Some of these things could happen with that knowledge in mind.

  • Tverboven

    This list is just the tip of the iceberg. A lot of terminologies will also be a thing of the past. Check out:

    5 Things That We Need a New Name For >> http://wp.me/tcfd

    and 5 More Things >> http://wp.me/ptcfd-4Y

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/HaroldmillerforSan-Franciscomayor-Dotorg/100000531985945 HaroldmillerforSan Franciscoma

    I thought in 1986 big brother was going to take over, and they got that wrong.

    • Gholden

      Assuming you are referring to the classic novel 1984, those who thought big brother (sic) was going to take over in 1986 were indeed wrong. Anyone who has the slightest grasp of Orwell (or “they” as you call him) knows he was not speaking as much of the future as he was about the past. Big Brother wasn’t a prediction, it was a commentary on what had already begun. You missed it I guess. Wake up, or you and your students will miss the tremendous opportuities afforded by 21st Century education as well.

      • Wendy in Michigan

        GHolden, I am very intrigued by all of your posts and would love to contact you with many more questions than can be addressed in this thread. I noticed that you asked to be contacted by skype, but I don’t have that capability on all the devices I use. My children attend a Montessori school and it has been extremely difficult to convince the leaders of the school that technology can enhance the classroom that Maria Montessori imagined. We have a huge technology grant that is just sitting there because of the fear of technology. I would appreciate contact via email, if you are so inclined. My contact info is: wendyschwartz@wideopenwest.com Thank you for all that you’ve shared, Wendy

  • Trowilliams

    what is a digital portfolio?? and how will it be a big factor in college admissions??

  • RAMAKRISHNA.KOPPAKA

    I have read all the above 21 ( Twenty one),points very carefully.Thanks.
    In my mind there is a dream,when ever I see small kids from 3 years + carrying bags almost equal to their weight,on their backs.When will a day come when they go to school,without carrying anything in their hands.

  • Fred

    I certainly hope it doesn’t come to this … “vision.” Gen X has enough people with horrid “people skills”

  • http://profiles.google.com/kilgoretrout321 Zack Oliver

    hate to break it to you but the real advancements must come in the things being taught. Religion has gone too far controlling what is taught in the schools. Kids need to know the facts of life, whether its sex stuff, or basic facts about religions. But no one knows stuff like that so they are ignorant and uninformed. My family didn’t go to church when I was little besides a Unitarian Universalist church. I had no idea what a Lutheran or a Catholic was until I took a class on Renaissance Lit and had it explained to me what was going on back then. I had learned what the Reformation was, but I had no idea what it meant because public schools can’t talk about religion the way grown ups do. You go to school to LEARN. Not to be confused. That’s the other thing, the way school is taught now deliberately makes it difficult for kids to learn. And teachers are mediocre. That’s because school is slow to pick up on and implement the newest information and research about how Human beings’ brains work, and how we learn. The education system needs to be able to adapt quickly and efficiently to new developments when they involve helping children learn. Kids these days go to school WAY TOO MUCH and work WAY TOO HARD. They get sooo much hw. At a certain point, the education system needs to realize that the world is far too advanced to pack into K-12 the way they do it. Either they need to stop lying to kids and introduce more advanced stuff at an early age, or they need to figure out what they can cut out. Kids need art and music classes as well. School should focus on helping children become intelligent, responsible, good people. Not how to cheat the system and copy/paste and reword from sparknotes. Some intelligent people need to sit down and figure out what is enough to know for a person in the world to be healthy and happy and make intelligent life decisions. This will involve teaching them how to learn on their own so that if they want to know something, they can. The internet is alright, but kids don’t seem to know how unreliable it is, because they aren’t taught how to discern between valuable and mediocre knowledge. That’s because their textbooks are crap. And anyone who heard about the recent decisions by the Texas schoolboard knows this. Cutting out Thomas Jefferson? Are you kidding me? This is why a secular version of religious education must be taught in schools. Most people don’t have a good grasp of basic religious history. And this is probably the most important information you can have! We go to war over religion, we choose our politicians over religion, our friends, our enemies, our children’s schools, our music our movies, the way we treat the Earth, the way we treat strangers and immigrants and gays and straights and transgender people and people of other races. It all comes down to religious beliefs, and if that isn’t a foundation of a person’s education OUTSIDE of a biased church organization that will often tell only one side, then it explains why our nation is so messed up. Kids WANT TO KNOW THIS STUFF because not knowing it confuses them. It confused me! I couldn’t understand a lot of why people hated each other, and I couldn’t understand events in history, like Manifest Destiny and New World exploration and why certain presidents were voted for, and why people are racist, and basically how the world workds. Now I know, and I didn’t have to get brainwashed by a church for years to learn it. I got AN EDUCATION. Would’ve been nice to get it back in middle school or high school when I started asking these questions. So I hope the major thing that’s outdated by 2020 is our educational system. Especially the way we teach our kids about religion. Because it’ll create a more understanding and accepting society once people get some neutral, unbiased information about religion, because believe me, there’s a lot out there.

    • http://profiles.google.com/seejayjames seejay james

      Great points! A massive re-tinking about what is important in education is sorely needed. Religion is especially troublesome from an education standpoint. It needs to be investigated objectively by students, and they need exposure to as many as possible.

  • http://profiles.google.com/seejayjames seejay james

    Interesting things to think about. I think some are correct, but others just aren’t…like paper. We will be using paper for many, many years, but ideally we’ll use it for special things, not everything. Yes, we use a lot less because we can read things on a screen, but think of the number of things we’re reading today compared to 20 years ago… probably a hundred times as much information. So when you want to print something out, you need to be selective. And in a lot of cases, it’s just easier than relying on an electronic device…espeially if the screen is small, dim, the battery’s almost dead, or you don’t have connectivity…etc. Books will have a similar, gradual decline, but they will have an important place for a long time. In many cases, a screen just doesn’t cut it, though admittedly, some of the readers are getting pretty close—mainly the paper-like contrast and not having the need to be sitting at a desk, using a keyboard and mouse. In other words, they’re getting more like real books, for good reason.I’m all for using technology (sometimes) to give us something that a low-tech option doesn’t have, but really, we’re using way too much of it. People, primarily younger people, spend way too long on the phone and texting. It’s just not needed, and it has gotten to the point where it’s damaging—it’s being used as an escape from the surroundings, as is being permanently wired in to music. These are also constant potential distractions to otherwise immersive experiences like reading or enjoying a great meal. Yes, people can turn off their phones…but they don’t. It’s depressing actually, because without that kind of committment to immersion in an experience, you just don’t get the full effect. (Sure, sometimes you don’t really need or want such an effect, but…the overall trand is towards multi-attention, which is great for some things but absolutely robs other experiences.)The open, social feel on my campus has changed a lot in 10 years, and the main reason is immersion in these devices. I’m not saying they should go—we probably couldn’t last a day without them (though we survived without them throughout history, and up until only about 15 years ago). But the amount and purpose of their usage has gotten totally out of control. So, initiatives which have kids use their phones or texting for school-related things, I think, is a bad way to go…they use them far too much already. Use a tablet without Internet instead, so they can get the immersion and interactivity that promotes learning, but without distractions.All that said, the movements towards differentiated learning, open courseware, virtual field trips, time flexibility, etc., are awesome. They are transforming the old ways as we speak, and most of it is an improvement. I also like the “have your students do the website/graphic design” idea…and the follow-up comment about having them do the plumbing and instruction too. Think about it…these could be very real, problem-based learning opportunities, especially if students work as apprentices of sorts (even just for an hour). And the idea of having kids take over large parts of the instruction is fantastic. It CAN be done and is being done in many places already. With the right structure and encouragement, the students themselves will transform what is viewed as worthwhile to learn. It’s overdue. And there’s no reason teachers, parents, and administrators wouldn’t be just as involved. Let it be an open discussion and debate, and reach a compromise that everyone agrees on. Difficult? You bet. Needed? I think so. Illuminating? Completely! It’s a golden opportunity to reassess what we think is important for learning and knowledge. I imagine a lot of the traditional subjects would get changed considerably and blended into other ones. That’s muchmore in line with how the world and the brain work anyway.Anyway, lots more to rant about, but it’s time to get back to endless emails. Yeah, that’s another thing…what percentage of time do people at work spend in front of a computer? It’s totally out of hand. We need to reconsider some priorities before we just wire in forever…

  • Coy_maggie

    “to allow less people on campus at any one time”

    Perhaps Mr. Blake-Plock might learn the proper use of less and fewer
    .

  • PMStall

    When did technology change the way the human mind develops?  The abstract concepts that need to be mastered to understand algebra are only starting to develop in most 14 year old minds.  Forcing the majority of 13 and 14 year old students to undertake the rigors of algebra is maybe why the United States is laging so far behind much of the rest of the world in the math field.  We are making our students hate math by forcing them to learn things they are not capable of learning. 

    • Gholden

      This will be good news to my grade 5 and 6 students who do algebra. They shall have to stop doing it immediately or they will start “laging” (sic) behind the rest of the world. Unless of course the research is right and technology IS changing the way the human mind develops. (You might try looking that up PMStall.) Or perhaps it has something to do with the way math is being taught? I’ve never found children very amicable to doing anything that people were “forcing” them to do. 

    • Fife

      I completely
      agree with PMStall. Someone, anyone, find research that states the majority of
      kids (nationally or locally) below the age of 13/14 are developmentally ready
      for the abstract concepts in Algebra. Don’t bother trying because you won’t
      find any…

      Today,
      and tomorrow there will be kids younger than 13/14 who are ready to master
      Algebra and good for them. But the vast majority of kids are not ready to
      master the concepts and skills of Algebra. Notice I write the word master; if
      one wants to think of mastery in terms of typical grades than equate it with an
      A or B. So many students who take Algebra I now, earn a D or F and just pass
      by. Or even earn C’s but their understanding is minimal at best.

      Unfortunately,
      initiatives like having a certain number of 8th graders in Algebra I and get
      credit (or pass) is complete nonsense. Students can earn low grades (D’s and
      even an F) and still pass. These type of initiatives are politically motivated,
      not what’s best practice in education. Unfortunately, the public is swayed by
      such information. When will most parents and pretty much all politicians
      realize learning something well is far better than just getting credit for it
      even if learning it well means taking a course one, two or even three years
      later.

  • schmatto

    Things that WILL be obsolete by 2020, that’s a pretty damn big call, saying they definitely WILL be obsolete by then. Sorry, but I remember the 60s & predictions like rocket cars, etc., then the early 80s when serious researchers & futurists predicted our biggest problem would be how to manage our increased leisure time due to technology taking care of much of our work & menial tasks [ROFL x 1 000 000 !!!!!!!!!!!!!] You can say things MIGHT happen but WILL, come on!!!

    • Gholden

      Hmmm…how can I put this so it can be easily understood? I do not have a GPS system in my car. I’ve never seen one or used one. I don’t understand the technology, and probably never will. For these reasons it’s somewhat understandable that I could easily believe that such a thing is not possible, or doesn’t even exist. Where my disbelief becomes foolish is when I choose to ignore the evidence that GPS systems already exist in many cars. I can talk about all kinds of red herrings to try and deflect myself into accepting the error of my thinking, but it doesn’t change the reality of GPS systems in cars. Similarly, “Things That Will Be Obsolete by 2020″ brings up things that are already obsolete in many, many classes. They will certainly not be obsolete in places where the teachers prefer to cling to an irrational belief that these possibilities do not exist. I for one would certainly NOT offer to invest in a GPS system I didn’t believe existed, or could not be built. Perhaps the 2020 date giving has more to do with the date when such teachers will be retiring than what is the current reality in other teachers’ classrooms. 

  • mathfreek

     I am not sure how much statistics can be done without algebra. 

  • SimmPole

     You are very optimistic! I can only hope this will happen.

  • Lwlau

     Definitely food for thought. I do see the writing on the wall… As an elementary school struggling to keep up with the technology, I find myself feeling quite inadequate and behind. It is not that I am unwilling to learn, but the district is not offering enough time and support in this area.

  • Muk_raker

     Rubbish!
    Look at any post modern sci-fi film; 2001 ring a bell. Are we commuting to the moon in Ralph Lauren designer space suits? We are all ways at least 100 years behind the sci-fi writers. Disagreement welcomed.

    • Gholden

       It is the JOB of sci-fi writers to “all ways” (sic) try to be 100 years ahead. They wouldn’t be doing their job if they were not. They don’t have a crystal ball, so they guess. (Imagine that!) Sometimes they are right, and sometimes they are wrong. More often than not they are wrong. Usually the future comes faster than they supposed it would. I’m not sure what the science fiction genre has to do with this article however. If you’ve read the posts most of these “predictions” have already come to pass. Take a look.

  • guest

     some of these I find accurate while others are a little outlandish. I just finished the first year of my undergrad and the part about centralized institutions is extremely accurate. I could do the majority of my work from home or even out of the city, province etc (I’m from canada). However I disagree with the complete removal of paper use. While some things have switched to electronic media paper seems (to me) to be fundamental for proper learning. If we had articles assigned to read off of the computer, less students in my tutorials did those as opposed to paper-copy readings. In addition I would never dream of handing a paper in, without printing a copy and going over it with a red pen. I know my wallet sure hurts after buying all my textbooks, i don’t see them disappearing. I feel that the mix of paper and electronic media based tools are very appropriate for the learning environment, all of my quizzes for one class were online, as were my lecture notes, but I still had to read, write exams, and hand in papers in paper and online. 
    - Second Year Student The University of Western Ontario 

  • http://www.facebook.com/stephanie.heller1 Stephanie Heller

     

    Most of what you said is true and is definitely what 21st
    century is all about.  So maybe we
    will have smarter students after all. 
    There will always be paper books though, because some of us old people
    can’t read that small and kids need to see their work on a big screen.  The students will also have memory
    sticks or cards. No more excuses that they forgot their homework at home and
    solid proof  of school day work to show
    parents.

     

    Communication etiquette will change also.  During my daughter’s graduation two
    years ago, most of the graduating class was texting. When we eat, I don’t allow
    them to text, so they put the phone on their lap and surrptiously text.

    There are two ways that technology is going to affect the
    future, communications, and education.  IT people are lucky because they will be the fixers and
    technology is always going to need people with IT skills to fix things.  Added to that will be software
    engineers.  Rather than use a Smart
    board, the could ask the programmers to make a program for them.

     

    Palms were the one of the first ways of  being able to make education mobile,
    but they didn’t take off that well. The stylus to use the palm was a hassle.
    But today, almost everyone I know has a cell phone, droid, smart phone,
    etc.  Networks can be set (that’s
    when the IT’s are used) with the classes being taught.  Students can take pictures and download
    music relevant to what they are studying.

     

    Teachers can assign certain websites or ask that their
    students find websites that fit whatever you are trying to teach. Have you seen
    how fast kids text today?  It’s
    fast because in a way, texting is like shorthand. I’m 53 and can’t do what my
    23 year old can do with texting. 
    It takes me fifteen minutes to type “how are you” one the phone.  I’m old school, I can type fast without
    looking. She can text faster than I can type.

     

    We could have a national curriculum.  There is nothing wrong with the
    standards for the different disciplines of learning.  Why each state spends money making up their own standards is
    ludicrous.  Each state would have
    to include a social studies standard for their state for the fourth graders.

     

    We will also need cyber libraries, librarys whose
    specialists are equipped to look for items on-line and books for reading for
    pleasure.  We will need computers
    for their larger screens, and I think maybe people won’t grumble too much about
    feeding children. You are right when you say that children don’t need a longer
    school day.

     

    The points I totally agree with are 3,4,5, 6, 7, 9,10, 12,
    13, 14, 15, 16, 20 and 21.

     

    If the curriculum was the same everywhere, (btw for those
    not in the loop) all a standard says is “students will be able to perform x by
    y.”

     

    To sum things up:

     

    1.             
    Differential instruction will be standard driven
    and the same standards will be used nationally.

    2.             
    Instead of each state giving a test, all states
    can give the same test. 
    Standardized tests will still be needed to be given to measure the
    student’s individual progress.

    3.             
    Most kids have a phone, and if they lose it more
    than once, their parents will not be really happy because it’s not like a text
    that taxpayers pay for but a phone that the family pays cash out of pocket.  Parents can be involved by having to
    check off on their children’s school work for the day.

     

     

    It
    will take time but it is the future. 
    The times they are a changing.good article

     

     

  • http://www.facebook.com/stephanie.heller1 Stephanie Heller

      

    Most of what you said is true and is definitely what 21st
    century is all about.  So maybe we
    will have smarter students after all. 
    There will always be paper books though, because some of us old people
    can’t read that small and kids need to see their work on a big screen.  The students will also have memory
    sticks or cards. No more excuses that they forgot their homework at home and
    solid proof  of school day work to show
    parents.

     

    Communication etiquette will change also.  During my daughter’s graduation two
    years ago, most of the graduating class was texting. When we eat, I don’t allow
    them to text, so they put the phone on their lap and surrptiously text.

    There are two ways that technology is going to affect the
    future, communications, and education.  IT people are lucky because they will be the fixers and
    technology is always going to need people with IT skills to fix things.  Added to that will be software
    engineers.  Rather than use a Smart
    board, the could ask the programmers to make a program for them.

     

    Palms were the one of the first ways of  being able to make education mobile,
    but they didn’t take off that well. The stylus to use the palm was a hassle.
    But today, almost everyone I know has a cell phone, droid, smart phone,
    etc.  Networks can be set (that’s
    when the IT’s are used) with the classes being taught.  Students can take pictures and download
    music relevant to what they are studying.

     

    Teachers can assign certain websites or ask that their
    students find websites that fit whatever you are trying to teach. Have you seen
    how fast kids text today?  It’s
    fast because in a way, texting is like shorthand. I’m 53 and can’t do what my
    23 year old can do with texting. 
    It takes me fifteen minutes to type “how are you” one the phone.  I’m old school, I can type fast without
    looking. She can text faster than I can type.

     

    We could have a national curriculum.  There is nothing wrong with the
    standards for the different disciplines of learning.  Why each state spends money making up their own standards is
    ludicrous.  Each state would have
    to include a social studies standard for their state for the fourth graders.

     

    We will also need cyber libraries, librarys whose
    specialists are equipped to look for items on-line and books for reading for
    pleasure.  We will need computers
    for their larger screens, and I think maybe people won’t grumble too much about
    feeding children. You are right when you say that children don’t need a longer
    school day.

     

    The points I totally agree with are 3,4,5, 6, 7, 9,10, 12,
    13, 14, 15, 16, 20 and 21.

     

    If the curriculum was the same everywhere, (btw for those
    not in the loop) all a standard says is “students will be able to perform x by
    y.”

     

    To sum things up:

     

    1.             
    Differential instruction will be standard driven
    and the same standards will be used nationally.

    2.             
    Instead of each state giving a test, all states
    can give the same test. 
    Standardized tests will still be needed to be given to measure the
    student’s individual progress.

    3.             
    Most kids have a phone, and if they lose it more
    than once, their parents will not be really happy because it’s not like a text
    that taxpayers pay for but a phone that the family pays cash out of pocket.  Parents can be involved by having to
    check off on their children’s school work for the day.

     

     

     

    It
    will take time but it is the future. 
    The times they are a changing.

     

     

    • Wittgensteins Beetle

       Is this from your mobile phone, where two words is an entire line of text?

      I already have to check off our kids work for the day and teach them the shit they claim their teacher did not explain in class (yeah I am sure some of it is BS). However, Why are we having to have them like 30 days more  a year because the school year is a shitload less but I am age 33 explaining things to them I learned 25 years ago… WHY? So the teachers can be worthless fucks and teach about 5-10% less days…????

      Die in a fire…

  • Cy

    I think these are great ideas and i’m sure we’re already seeing these things done on a smaller lighter scale, but to be honest i don’t think it’s affordable. Everything has to maintain a cost efficiency, and this is all predicated on the idea that people think education and people are more important than money, and they don’t.

    This isn’t a cynical perspective. I’m just saying profit is more important than people and that’s a fact. If you want things like this to happen, we have to change our values and the system overall. Good luck.

  • Lkrams93

    I don’t think that books should be on this list. Books are timeless. They’ll never be “obsolete”.

    • Gholden

      Yes, yes, books are timeless, horses are timeless too. We will never (God forbid) wipe out horses, or stop using them. But are they obsolete? That of course depends on what you USE them for. Day before yesterday Amazon announced that ebooks now outsell the paper ones. Who would have thought? Now, think again. 

      • Wittgensteins Beetle

         How in the fuck do you know. Who cares about horses? We are discussing our fucking kids… Wheres the dodo birds and Dinosaurs (yeah, I know the birds count as they are Sauropsida)? Im so victimized by humanity…. Seriously?

        OH shit 9.99 kindle… or .01 paperback?! OMW?! How about I illegally download this dumbass concept you have of intellectual property? Is that survival of the fittest or natural selection? What is a printer? OH… so we can print newspapers and phonebooks and shit that you would have thought went out 10 years ago…. Its still big and all over. Get over your predictions.

    • Gholden

      Less stimulating, more stimulating, more useful, less? I cannot tell you what to think, but have a look  http://www.ted.com/talks/mike_matas.html Certainly the new generation will be whether you want them to or not. 

    • Wittgensteins Beetle

       Yeah because paper doesnt deteriorate and humans will ALWAYS be around… wait, we shouldnt say never… lets say for a hundred years at least.

  • Chelsea

    This scars the shit out of me. 

    • Gholden

      I should hope so. 

  • Chelsea

    This scares the shit out of me. 

  • Anonymous

    your timeframe is about 40 years too fast, given the current speed of change.

    • Gholden

      The time frame that is out of whack is yours. Others in your situation have done what they needed to do and are already educating for this century. You have opportunities to make connections and do the same, have you done this? What is your twitter account? Which educational technology conventions have you attended? Seek and you shall find. Make excuses and your students will at best be well prepared to work in an industrial age setting. 

      • Gholden

        jimmysilvs…my response to your observation assumed far too much. You did not say that these changes cannot, or should not happen within 10 years, just that you do not believe they will happen generally before 40 years is up. For all I know you already have a teaching practice that equips your student for 21st century citizenship and employment. If so, my sincere apologies for the impatient tone of my response. My only defense is that so many of the comments here are disparaging regarding not just the need for change, but the reality of the changes that are driving that need. Again, my apologies if I painted you with the wrong brush. : ) 

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_NKXQD3JTXMDBKLO3C7MOAJLM2U Brandy

    LOl.  I read this list and couldn’t help but see how this smacked of homeschooling NOW!   No desk, individualized attention, counting learning, not hours, & so on.  I run a once a week co-op for homeschoolers, and we don’t always have desks, have classes indoors and certainly don’t have classes that are just 1 grade.  Minimum is usually 3 grades, or no grades at all, just competency levels- Can you do Pre-cal? Come on in! We have had some classes that spanned, believe it or not, 9 grades in one classroom. The older students helped co- teach to the younger ones during ending study period and homework for each student (not grade) was given so each person rose to their potential in Geography.  It was a marvelous experiment in the possible of co-operative learning where each student was recognized for their individuality and contributed to the group with their strengths.
       One thing *I* need to improve on is paper consumption.  I use copious amounts of paper; printing stuff, copying stuff for our lego group, forms, more forms, and, oh yeah, more forms.  I can stand to do far better in that category. 

    • http://profile.yahoo.com/RPS6QZ6HLKIMUI3BB5P35QAPI4 Jennifer B

      Our school just started a cyber academy for 6-12th grades.  There is a hub that the students can go to with questions at the high school.  They can still be a part of school events.  It starts at 6th grade because of what you said, students needs to grasp the basics. Being on the committee board that created this “cyber” school–I prefer the word Hybrid, we were looking at the statistics of special needs/autism.  We are a rural district so the drop out rate is also high.  While we public school my children, I actually school of choice my daughter out because of her creative needs.  I have an Autistic (genius) son and while he public schools, I sat on the board for this committee and expressed my concern, for the junior high years, and how I had to consider home school.  Thus this was born.  I am not sure why public school teachers or those that public school get on their high horse when someone says they home school.  Some families just do things differently, or need to.  I am one of those families.  I support both sides of education.  If it wasn’t for the home school boards that I am on I wouldn’t have many of the tools that I share with the local public school.  

  • http://www.facebook.com/mini.pilot Michael Kimball

    you’re an idiot.
    non-structured learning makes for non-structured and incomprehensible students – and with the current level of parent-teacher/parent-child commitment, a student with no reason and/or drive to learn. Learning 24/7? if we could get the FOCUS of e-impaired (that’s the student with TOO MUCH exposure to e-facilities) to narrow for even five minutes on a single topic (not limited to 140 characters) we would actually have LEARNING. More e- will NOT make this fractal disconnect better.
    No Desks? have you even thought this one out? I can just see it now, yeah – let’s all do our wokr on the BART via smart-phone or while driving – I’m certain we can add one more task in the  daily grind of the over-multi-tasked life we’re pushing now.Math? Algebra? essential to base physics courses that have enough trouble getting our current crop of students through – we are having to teach MATH 860, which is PRE algebra, to a large portion of students entering into the CC system in the first year… I’d love to see Algebra or even the ability to add fractions in students abilities MY classes.Wiki? almost as reliable as CNN. You’ve got to be kidding.
    I could go on, but this list is lower than a Shakespeare tragedy.

    • Tverboven

      You are one of the teachers the rest of us wish would retire so we can move forward.

      • http://profiles.google.com/siouxgeonz Susan Jones

        Why?  Because he wishes his students could add fractions?
        Moving around isn’t the same as moving forward.

        • Wittgensteins Beetle

           Probably because the opening comment was “you’re an idiot”. What a revolutionary. I hope he teaches my baby someday so I can beat the fucking shit out of him for calling my child intellectually inferior simply because she does not think precisely the same way. Yeah… Back in the stone age we killed dumbfucks and assholes that could only talk shit…

  • Asscheese

    You’re an idiot to think that paper and books will be obsolete in thirty years. Get over yourself and your technology.

    • Wittgensteins Beetle

      I doubt the OP is any sort of cognitively deficient individual. If anything, your asscheese worthless fuck of a piece of faggot shit residing at your grandmothers house fucktardedness must have contributed to the complete lack of comprehension as to the contrivance to which this article was founded.

      Technology is above all of us, so you must wish her very well. Good job being an ignoramus to your very core, sir. (assuming only a dude would post as “asscheese”) I presume it is an homage to your dads cum oozing from your cheeks as you type “eediot stuffz from ur Keeybord?!1/.”

  • Hahaha

    michigan public schools can’t even afford to upgrade their ROOFS. best of luck waiting for this to happen.

  • Grace

    Most of these predictions I don’t agree with at all. These predictions are of a total reconstruction of the educational system in nine years. Seriously, desks? The only one that I think could possibly come true is the teaching of Algebra in middle school rather than highschool. Algebra was offered at my school for any 8th graders who wanted to chalenge themselves, but it was also offered to Freshmen as well. I could see that being transferred completely to middle school by 2020, but all of these other predictions are completely ridiculous. They may happen in 50-100 years but definitely not within the next nine. 

    • Fife

      Grace, I’m curious what you think of my reply to PMStall’s post?

      I completely agree with PMStall. Someone, anyone, find research that states
      the majority of kids (nationally or locally) below the age of 13/14 are
      developmentally readyfor the abstract concepts in Algebra. Don’t bother
      trying because you won’tfind any…Today and tomorrow there will
      be kids younger than 13/14 who are ready to masterAlgebra and good for them.
      But the vast majority of kids are not ready tomaster the concepts and skills
      of Algebra. Notice I write the word master; ifone wants to think of mastery
      in terms of typical grades than equate it with anA or B. So many students
      who take Algebra I now, earn a D or F and just passby. Or even earn C’s but
      their understanding is minimal at best.Unfortunately, initiatives
      like having a certain number of 8th graders in Algebra I and getcredit (or
      pass) is complete nonsense. Students can earn low grades (D’s andeven an F)
      and still pass. These type of initiatives are politically motivated,not
      what’s best practice in education. Unfortunately, the public is swayed
      bysuch information. When will most parents and pretty much all
      politiciansrealize learning something well is far better than just getting
      credit for iteven if learning it well means taking a course one, two or even
      three yearslater.

      • Wittgensteins Beetle

         Is this like my grandparents who dont know fuck about multiplication? I would fucking hope for the future of mankind that your next gen kids would get algebra.. The problem is that we DO NOT USE IT AT ALL. You WILL lose it. So ultimately you are suggesting that we jump into jobs that necessitate it or hobbies.. WHY? Show your work too, please.

  • Maximilian

    I want to see a school to learn learning, To improve Memorization, maintain focus and process knowledge without bias.
    To undertake  a lifetime project that offers gratification and an opportunity to share knowledge.
    Replace competition with cooperation and and collaboration.

  • Damfino

    These kinds of changes can’t come soon enough. Our current mode of “educating” our children is grossly outdated and ineffectual. Given our digital resources, sending my fifth grader home with 10-15 pages of homework a week seems just slightly wasteful.

    Modern technology is not a curse, it’s progress. Oh, wait, I forgot, progress is evil, right? Give me a break. I can’t help but picture a lot of you with canes, waving them in the air and screaming about the “whippersnappers”.

    *Sigh*

  • sj

    And who’s going to pay for all this change? Your community’s taxpayers? yeah, right.

    • Gholden

      If anyone really CARES about making overdue changes in education, they might take a few moments to look at the FACTS. Creating a more EFFECTIVE personalized and engaging learning environment for children is CHEAPER when using technology. How long must students WAIT for school and political administrators to think bigger than simply changing the light bulbs? Given that you won’t believe me, LOOK at where this is DONE. Then, give both the students and your community’s taxpayers a break by spreading the news that these changes are overdue.  http://vimeo.com/23834061 

  • Samantha

    With all of the predictions you have made here, it looks to me like you should have added the Fine Arts to your list.  How do any of the changes you listed here support music, drama, or art?

    • Wittgensteins Beetle

       Art is about as goddamned worthless as the arguments about Aesthetics, Beauty, Ethics and Moral Responsibility… Really? Lets argue how dumbfuck religion is now adays when the bible (still) suggests to stone a person for working on Sundays… You dont get to claim your tire is flat and you HAVE to be at work on Monday……..YOU FUCKING DIE…Stoned…With goddamned rocks.. Cmon.. Desks arent so bad now… I’d hire Samantha to change my tire and let her die by stoning squad. WIN/WIN right there… eh?

  • Churchsmoker

    Really, just an abysmal list. The world will change in so many ways in the next nine years, but the ways you’ve described are baseless. You think the SAT’s will disappear? Sigh. Paper? Sigh. You have far greater faith than I have that tablets and laptops will be cheap enough, or that education departments will be forward thinking enough to use them effectively at all. I’m sorry, I don’t want to rag on you, but your list is just bad. Let me put it this way, what is the number one thing technology has made obsolete in the last twenty years (in terms of education)? Spelling.

    One more thing: I love Wikipedia, and I suggest everyone use it as a supplement to their research, but it is not the greatest democratizing force in the world (honestly, that’s just laughable), nor should students cite it on papers. It has massive flaws, just like democracy does, but is a wonderful, and very useful project.

    If you had titled this “21 things I hope will be obsolete by 2020,” the article would have been much stronger.

    • Wittgensteins Beetle

       Either way. Anything a human being states to other “supposed human beings in which we may or may not interact with” is baseless. There is no way at all to know what will or will not be the future unless you’ve determined the movement and location and spatiotemporal situations of all particles from now until 2020. You cannot know. Why guess? because people like to… So really, just shut the fuck up about it and post on your facefuckbook about how you’re probably smarter than 6% of the retard fux that use computers these days.

  • Kaitlyn Bradley

    I hate this. I’m not old either. I’m 19, I love technology and I am studying to become an English teacher. My wish for the future is for technology to play a role in assisting teachers not to replace or interfere with the crucial learning process.

    • Gholden

      Whew! It’s always a great relief to realize that one can be progressive without being young. It should in fact NOT be the case! Most of the colleagues who share the views I’ve expressed in this blog are in their 50s and 60s. They “been there” and “done that” Kaitlyn, which is exactly why the winds of change have them excited. We’ve practiced the old pedagogy for decades, and have found it wanting. It would be unfair to expect anyone who has not walked in our shoes, or shared our passion to want MORE for our students, to understand. And unfortunately, since many faculties of education continue to limit their tech training to PowerPoint, many young teachers will take years to discover the potential of the social media tools they use routinely for more “personal” matters than education. The migration of students to schools that will provide a 21st century education will either eliminate their jobs, or leave them teaching classes of disengaged, underachieving students. The growth of distance learning is the canary that  some might consider listening to, but most will not. Familiar sounds are always much more comforting. Speaking of tweeting though…get on twitter if you want to get a sense of what is happening. Or remain fixed, determined to call upon your own limited experience for direction. The choice, as always, is yours. Good luck. 

      • Wittgensteins Beetle

         haha

  • chrisa

    r u psychic ?

  • Gizmocat

    Some of these predictions seem to be off base.  No desks?  Really?     What if you need a space to work on for something that isn’t virtual? I realize there are some that are so excited about the ‘virtual’ possibilities in teaching children, but there should be room in the classroom for real objects too.  I guess music programs and phys ed will also be ‘obsolete’, so the coat check instead of a locker would work.  Some people learn better dealing with real objects rather than watching or participating in a virtual environment.  I know that I learned well from books, but there are things that I wouldn’t have been able to learn without a ‘hands on’ approach. Things like playing a musical instrument, cooking, phys ed, sewing and shop classes.  I doubt a virtual environment will have someone learn the things that require a hands on experience in quite the same way as dealing with a real object would. 

    Some of the greatest discoveries were made only after making error after error after error.  I have learned just as much from my failures as I have from my successes.  Maybe the focus on education shouldn’t be the new and shiny technology but to focus on how someone can learn from their experiences, because really, isn’t school supposed to be preparation for life?

  • Learn

    These aren’t educational pipe dreams. It’s happening as we speak; if you want it faster, support it! See the future for yourself: http://www.zoeticelan.com

    • Witgensteins Beetle

       Cybernetic Implants for your childs Future.Com YAY

  • Optimistic One

    I think the thing that is just about as interesting as this list is the reaction that it has engendered.  Even if you don’t agree that this list is valid due to budget constraints, entrenched thinking on the part of the education establishment, or whatever,  I think it’s important to explore the ideas presented.  Yes I am suggesting that people (students, parents, teachers, community leaders, etc.) play the ‘what if’ game.  How do we as any of those included in the group above adapt to, adjust to, react to, envelope or extend the ideas that are being presented here? 

    As a marketing academic I often use the example of Napster and the slow reaction and the resistance of the music recording industry to peer-to-peer file sharing in my strategy class.  The recording industry tried to punish and sue their way out of the effects of the technology.  This was not a good strategy.  Once the technology herd is out of the gate, the smart company, teacher, student, administrator, and/or parent gets out in front and finds ways to optimize its use for their specific purposes.

    For many of these 21 things, the technology already exists.  Some of the people suggesting that the ideas presented here are absurd are simply missing the larger point.  The key is not to fear these things but get a handle early and hone in on the positive aspects and try to squelch or control the negative things that are sure to happen without good management, just in case these things come to fruition.  So instead of dismissing this list out of hand, let’s really look closely at 1 through 21, because the realization of these may be closer than you think.

    • Wittgensteins Beetle

      Theres a strategy class? Is that Clausewitz or Nash and the introduction to game theory (neither movie with Russell Crowe, but both had the same concepts..)

      Realization to anything close to these 21 things are close.. These things were implemented in our lifetime.. Yes YOU 90 year old reading this, YES YOU 20 year old reading this.. What I am wondering is why so many people have these presuppositions that X will occur in 20 years (or in less than 8 years evidently) when we havent even created a robot that can go UP STAIRS or a REAL artificial intelligence that can show me how to get to the nearest gas station after I ask as clearly as possible 11 times. When we get a defined universal currency, universal language and universal method of instantly communicating the experiences we have will I believe any of these advancements are really significant.

      Desks are a think of the past? really? OMFG Books are otw outz? lolz… I think you’re right on the later shi+ though.. We’ll be outsourced via India, China etc, forced to learn Spanish and such just to keep our jobs. For those of you spending XXX years in college only to learn how to remain non-emotionally attached after a MMMF foursome, you can hope o just flat out never get a job unless it’s in something that is not yet gov’t regulated; Because everyone else (yeah… everyone) wants 6-12 months experience to even hire you.

      Educating our children isn’t the half of it. We need to educate our government on how to act; That aside, We have an opportunity to educate children in Philosophy, Logic, Science and other fantastic information for their growth.. Hardly anyone today could tell you when or if they’ve committed a fallacy. What is the point in predicting this garbage blog of a top 21 list? To say you KNEW it? Our children today cry because you walked in front of the Goddamned Television… You made some dinner they didnt like etc.. Theres so much severely wrong with our country than some stupid educational paradigms and premises that you have alluded to here.

      YOU look at 1-21… because the number of scientists, inventions and patents today are increasing so substantially that it does no good to predict ANYTHING, EVER. Especially crap so diversified as paper, desks and handheld phone app changes in the next 8 (eight) years.

      I will promise that paper will be around so much longer after computers or the harnessing of ANY electrical concept for that matter. But maybe you’ll be right for a minute to those that can read this. Im sure google will become such a super-powerhouse that it will shove any and all possible search hits of his page to oblivion within a few years.

      So many things seems ludicrous that I’ll just shut up and let everyone else read my much longer post on how none of this even matters.

  • Istandan

    I kind of agree with Rochejc.  One thing that will never be obsolete is human capacity for inertia and resistance to change.  A better way of looking at this is ’21 trends that could gain steam’.

    • Wittgensteins Beetle

       Isn’t Inertia the momentum of forward propulsion so that if a direction were to CHANGE then the inertia would prove more difficult for said change. Is this George Bush’s speech? “We Must Remain Steadfast, With Resolve and Resolve to Steadfastly blow up more of our own buildings to start wars in other countries to get what we want from them with the support of the public” WHOOO

  • http://twitter.com/cpk Charles

    22. Childhood.  The coming economic wasteland will make things like “education” obsolete.  Things like “survival” will be more in fashion.

    • Anonymous

      agree 100 %

      • Wittgensteins Beetle

         DUDE Zombie Apocalypse MAN YEAH!!!11 I Studied for that shit dude. We get you two are disappointed in your kids… Go post it on facebook because we dont care.

    • Anonymous

      agree 100 %

  • Anonymous

    When I first read some of the comments had mixed thoughts
    about how and what to write. Some of you need to read the Horizon Report (http://wp.nmc.org/horizon2011/). 

    Tina took the time to process her thoughts and made
    predictions and yet she received so many “put downs”. I appreciate the fact
    that reading her predictions made me think about the future of education.  And by the way she didn’t say desks, homework,
    or even paper. She did say there will be changes to the room arrangements and
    what homework will be. As for paper she said reduce by 90%.

    There are items that I believe will remain because education
    is such a bureaucracy. Any part of education that requires “over site” will have
    people sitting in chairs keeping track of the funding. So attendance offices and
    central offices will always be with us. Cafeteria food will remain because of the
    government’s deep interest in fighting childhood obesity. Algebra 1 will remain
    even though this math teacher has fought against it being seen as a “required
    course” in middle school. I have said if you want students to do better in high
    school Algebra 1 make it a requirement that students must pass it before they
    can get a drivers license.  

    • Anonymous

      Education is not bureaucracy. There fore no items will remain even may be more .

      • Wittgensteins Beetle

         This is only true because you said so… Anonymously… lol

    • Anonymous

      Education is not bureaucracy. There fore no items will remain even may be more .

  • Solsen

    Our school district is supposedly making a big push on technology this year. It will be interesting to see how they can implement this, given the fact that we only get to go to our computer lab 1 hour each week. BTW, our computer lab has dinosaur computers, half of which don’t work. It’s a joke.
    So, as far as our district is concerned, I think a lot of the things mentioned above will not be obsolete in 2020.

    • Anonymous

      Where is the equal opportunity for everyone in USA
      Does it differ from district to district .?

    • Anonymous

      Where is the equal opportunity for everyone in USA
      Does it differ from district to district .?

      • Wittgensteins Beetle

         Actually in accordance with determinism we have no free will based upon the obvious fact that we are locked into what we ARE and what we DO because of everyone elses affects and effects upon us. Guess what? Everyone is ultimately the “way they are” because they were molded that way through every second of their existence. Nothing should surprise you, nothing should upset you… The state of anything is the ONLY way that it ever could have been because of cause and effect. Thank GOD! wait Im not talking about Divine Plans haha because if “god” planned you to do the things that you do (like succumbing to temptation) then thered be no free will. How can free will act alongside FORCED REACTIONS TO STIMULI let alone the emotions we have…

        OH… Nothing is equal friend. We just have to pretend that we have a choice and decide to better ourselves through our very mindset… I have illicited the cause. You’re welcome.

  • James

    stupid, just stupid article

    • Wittgensteins Beetle

       Stupid is such a concise and brilliant term for STUFF… I bet you also call things GAY and DUMB too…

      If you had a less vacuous term or sensible rhetoric for WHY or HOW this is “stupid”, I’d be amused. Id be amused because clearly you cannot troll a site with any measurable amount of intellect, let alone a basic outline of what you mean by stupid… Are you saying that the author is stupid and you could do better? I think you went about it wrong in saying the article is stupid. Were the article stupid then it would not have been able to communicate with you very well and you would have to stupidly reply some stupid fuck of a shit, you mongoloid, invalid, fuck of an autistic, inbred faggot… Try that without commas… Fool.

      I threw that in there because youre probably some religious piece of Shi+ afraid of technology. Fool is the worst your god could come up with…

  • Jamari York

    This is a kook and fun way of putting this.

  • Guzman_business

    Here here for innovation, individualization, and learning throughout the world.

    • Wittgensteins Beetle

       It’d be better if it werent a race. Stupid fux in religion would have you believe that X or Y is the true god… only Physicists and other reputable scientists are actually pooling their resources.

  • Jay

    We’re in a global era of savage austerity policies and we have the reality of the “digital divide” to contend with in regards to technology and the information literacy skills sets needed to use tech in a critical, empowering manner. Although many of these trends are in motion, I don’t see my former middle school in South Central LA for example and the majority like it experiencing much of anything resembling this type of transformation.

  • Cynthia De Anda

    I was not aware people fear Wikipedia, I always look up info there.

    I hope cafeteria food improves as we have issues with health (Obesity, Diabetes, etc..) 

    • Wittgensteins Beetle

       Logical people fear Wiki for a minute. I once found out that John sucks Ram dicks on wikipedia on some entry that was most certainly not about John or even a noun necessarily.. So yeah… The “edits” you get on there are possibly false but if you have any sort of Logic Coding you should be able to not fear it.. If it sounds ridiculous, get a second (or third) opinion… duh

  • Bboren

    I believe many of these predictions are already coming true. Being a parent, I would love to have a video teacher conference, as parents don’t have time to take from work to invest in their child’s future because the constraints of a job don’t allow this to happen.
    Most parents care about their kids education and want to be included but can’t get the time off for these mandatory conferences.
    My Iphone is my life, I check e-mail surf the web, chat with my kids and find the information, take classes, so I would say computers definitely have changed!

  • BDLady

    Now if we could only get the school, state, and federal bureacracies to listen and pay attention!  Fear will keep most from moving forward while our youth will continue to push the envelope and walk to their own beat!

  • guest

    Students that only know how to use software but haven’t learned how to think will not be effective graphic designers. 

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=568898986 Leon Francis Shelhamer

    #16 needs to happen now

  • Stevie

    Ha, ha, ha!  Many of these predictions were made ten years ago, “… for the next ten years!”  The paper one was especially funny.  People have been predicting the demise of paper for the last 40 years and all we have done is produce more! 

    • Anonymous

      I made the prediction 10 years ago and all happened .
      We do not need teachers anymore: They resist.
      But you cannot stop the world .
      Cumputer was $ 2000 10 years ago today we have tablets for $ 35 .

    • Anonymous

      I made the prediction 10 years ago and all happened .
      We do not need teachers anymore: They resist.
      But you cannot stop the world .
      Cumputer was $ 2000 10 years ago today we have tablets for $ 35 .

      • Wittgensteins Beetle

         You win at life and abductive reasoning in a time when figuring out what COULD be around the corner after watching cartoons on the toilet, smoking weed is really hip. Just post it on your facebook with a fart joke and your friends will think you’re a brilliant prodigal prophet.

        Dude… This is absurd but you should start a religion on Facebook… DUDE… Awesome DUDE

  • http://www.sparefoot.com/San-Francisco-CA-self-storage.html San Francisco Storage

    The weird thing is, I think you are right. We are going to say goodbye to a lot of things we grew up with. Already, kids born today will have no recollection of a time before cell phones… crazy.

  • Caryl

    Ditto

  • B. B. Bennett

    Ah yes, once again the utopian dream is slid out to mesmerize us. I feel like I’m back in Disneyland’s FutureWorld. The problem with all of this is that it ignores the reality of this life. All of this stuff costs money, BIG money. Has she NO idea of how many students there are in California, much less the USA? There’s a reason the Cal education budget is so huge. And we can barely get the taxpayers to pay for what we have. They are even talking of cutting BACK on the number of days they’ll pay for. Parents, not all but some, -like- sitting down face to face with a teacher for the same reason business people -like- sitting down with their contemporaries: You get something from the non-verbal interchange that you will get in no other way, not even with cyberspace.

    Some of this is good, ignoring consultants and outsourcing for instance. I never listened to a consultant who gave me anything I was still using three months later. If you’ve had better luck, God bless you. Oh, and cafeteria food, although I cringe to think what will replace it.

  • http://www.facebook.com/john.m.morrison John Morrison

    Schools will be unchanged. Too many interests like them run autocratically like 19th century textile mils.  The weakest people enter the education business.  If you expect better, you are indeed folly-filled.  America is going down for the count, and there is nothing stopping it.

    • Anonymous

      There is one

      OWS

      • Alihaymeg

        Try to be patient with the teachers posting remarks here. You can’t expect them to accept that they will be replaced by machines any more than the automobile workers of the early 20th century could believe that they would be replaced by machines. There is an obvious need for a change in our approach to education. The current system is based on a “factory” type of model, and was created in a time when training individuals and using “tracking” techniques to direct them toward a career that they were capable of entering was the concern. The needs of modern individuals have changed. Is it more applicable to real-world living to know the formulas that would allow you to lay out a system of rafters from the ground and cut the pieces before ever ascending the ladder? Or would it make more sense to teach a person to use the instrument designed to free a person from having to know those calculations; which instrument is also capable of doing so with much greater speed and efficiency?

        The needs and requirements for modern life, and life into the future, require different skills and approaches than have served us well over the last century or so. Is it necessary to pour random facts into a child’s head when they can access all of human knowledge with a mouse click? What is now more important than anything is to teach a child HOW to learn, and to teach them what information to trust. The goal should be to create lifelong-learners capable of thinking critically and independently. The current system does not allow for amending information as new evidence emerges. It doesn’t encourage children to question the teacher or to come to an understanding on their own.
        Conformity and blind faith are what are required for success in the modern school system. It may have been a good run…but a new paradigm is moving into place. This is inevitable, as is the resistance to it by those who stand to lose.

    • Tigger

      I am not the weakest I chose education. Step into my classroom if you are so smart! Let’s see you handle 22 kids with 22 different learning needs and some come with no food, some have heard domestic violence and some just don’t care to be there. Come to my classroom Einstein and let’s see you shine.

      • Sally Wilton

        If that were the case I would rather not send my child to your class. I would teach at home or just let them learn at home. If you are just a babysitter then what is the point of it all?

  • Set2

    what kind of elitist, ill researched world do you live in?

    maybe the top 21 richest schools will be able to play with those ideas.

  • Anonymous

    Sorry. I said many of these 10 years ago.
    Teachers were about to kill me .
    Today even I say more
    There will not be schools, therefore no teachers
    Construction business will suffer .
    So will clothing. People will be bound home .
    Less gas consumption . Less cars. Less food.
    More oxigen no CO more water more forest less higways
    more health no sicknesses
    Less children but more sex  since there is no stress .
    Can you imagine what the technology can do ?

    • Wittgensteins Beetle

       Hey, everybody welcome Hugo Drax to the conversation….

  • Allan Teimble

    I agree, by 2020 schools will have joined the 21st Century, but it is important to correct the curriculum. Our students need to learn the fundamentals of why this Country was developed. All students need to study ThomasJjefferson and his concepts of freedom.  All students need to be able to pursue their interests, remembering that only 20% of students are college material, but we need a vocational education system that supports all students. All students should be encouraged to participate in community activities. Good citizenship is essential to our future.

    As for digital learning, I do think it is the future, but we need a causion. Ipods are essential as long as they are large enough. Using a device as small as our current Iphones is not healthy. Droctors are already seeing young adults losing eye sight because of the eye strain necessay to read such a small device. Students need to understand that a full size ipod is essential to their education and their health.

  • Allan Teimble

    I agree, by 2020 schools will have joined the 21st Century, but it is important to correct the curriculum. Our students need to learn the fundamentals of why this Country was developed. All students need to study ThomasJjefferson and his concepts of freedom.  All students need to be able to pursue their interests, remembering that only 20% of students are college material, but we need a vocational education system that supports all students. All students should be encouraged to participate in community activities. Good citizenship is essential to our future.

    As for digital learning, I do think it is the future, but we need a causion. Ipods are essential as long as they are large enough. Using a device as small as our current Iphones is not healthy. Droctors are already seeing young adults losing eye sight because of the eye strain necessay to read such a small device. Students need to understand that a full size ipod is essential to their education and their health.

  • mikey367

    All of this sounds great, but I teach children with cognitive disabilities, and 50% of my students’
    families are low income and non-english speakers.  They have no access to computers OR internet outside of school.  Until these things are available to ALL households, especially low income, I don’t know how 24/7 learning through technology is possible.

    • Wittgensteins Beetle

       WTF is with the double posting…

      We need to kill (to put it unsatisfactorily) the kids that cannot function in everyday society. Obviously we’re being too lenient on this race of humans we expect to adapt, breed and create a world for us when we are old and incapable. Why do we take care of the worthless fux of society. You seriously suggest low income handouts when a majority of them are DELIBERATELY LOW INCOME? You’d be low income too if you realized that you’d have more money and freedom if only one parent worked (you’d not have to pay daycare for your retarded kids either!).

      Cmon man…

      • http://www.facebook.com/robert.k.robinson.5 Robert Kyle Robinson

        ummmm…im low income, and i sure don’t choose to be, i gotta job, and i make descent, but things have been up and down, and we have been off every friday for over a month, and i try to tithe my paycheck, and haven’t even been able to do that like i should….God i believe understands that, but still i try to provide for my family, and do what i am suppose to do, and its hard on us. my wife is going to school full time, my oldest is in pre-k my youngest still has the rest of this school year and all of next in daycare @ $65 a week. now about the “retarded” kids, they didn’t ask for it, neither did the parents. my wife is going to school for teaching, but she is a para-professional at one of our schools. she works with autism. so forgive me if i get a little offended.

      • guest

        So from reading your comments you are saying Hitler’s methods of ethnic cleansing may have some merits for today.

  • mikey367

    All of this sounds great, but I teach children with cognitive disabilities, and 50% of my students’
    families are low income and non-english speakers.  They have no access to computers OR internet outside of school.  Until these things are available to ALL households, especially low income, I don’t know how 24/7 learning through technology is possible.

  • EnglishRocks

    Most of you seem to forget that the students we have today are our parents of tomorrow.  This means a definite shift in technology based thinking.  Yes, these students are communicating and producing online now, so why not when they are parents in 10 years.  With test clickers and online test engines we are already seeing a reduction in paper, so some of you need to get on board.

  • EnglishRocks

    Most of you seem to forget that the students we have today are our parents of tomorrow.  This means a definite shift in technology based thinking.  Yes, these students are communicating and producing online now, so why not when they are parents in 10 years.  With test clickers and online test engines we are already seeing a reduction in paper, so some of you need to get on board.

  • Bryce Spriggs

    This is not very viable.  It’s like the “no child left behind” Act – good in theory but impossible in reality.  The problem is money – you “pump” money into low income schools and then they have all the technology but the upper schools – the ones that are not “government funded” get left behind with little to no technology.  You shouldn’t be asking the teachers their opinions – you should be asking the technology people that support and implement it.  They will tell you the real story – not some school director/administrator that doesn’t have a clue.

  • Bryce Spriggs

    This is not very viable.  It’s like the “no child left behind” Act – good in theory but impossible in reality.  The problem is money – you “pump” money into low income schools and then they have all the technology but the upper schools – the ones that are not “government funded” get left behind with little to no technology.  You shouldn’t be asking the teachers their opinions – you should be asking the technology people that support and implement it.  They will tell you the real story – not some school director/administrator that doesn’t have a clue.

    • Jsmith

      Bryce,

      ALL public schools receive government funding.  So, I don’t understand your point.

    • Jsmith

      Bryce,

      ALL public schools receive government funding.  So, I don’t understand your point.

      • Wittgensteins Beetle

         His point is that he hasn’t taken into account the fallibility of human nature. Teachers falsify the tests of the “dumbfux” and up the average to “reccommended” levels of tested aptitude. The school gets their yearly grant even though they are in the Ghetto Of Parents Who Could F***ING Care Less and nobody cares… Put your child into Reverend Doctor Martin Luther King Junior High School Fo’ Tha’ Gangsta’, see how that works out…

  • Anonymous Platypus

    #22 – Teachers who don’t know how to use technology. (ROFL)

  • Jim

    90% paper reduction.  I doubt that. I printed this article so I could read it easier. 

    • http://trevor.dekoekkoek.net Trevor de Koekkoek

      I printed this article so I could put a big red “F” in a circle at the top.

  • Jim

    90% paper reduction.  I doubt that. I printed this article so I could read it easier. 

    • Wab1467

      how old are you jim?

      • Wittgensteins Bettle

        I think you both have a magic 8-ball that reveals “ask again Later”

    • Wab1467

      how old are you jim?

  • me here

    Wow, what great predictions! They almost remind me of the “kitchens of the future predictions” where you push a button and a complete gourmet meal is prepared in minutes by hydrating a tiny little cube. Maybe the idea where every person will fly to work or school with their own personal jet pack will come true. 

    Some of the items in the article would be nice but are not very realistic. Students learn far more from being in a classroom with an instructor and other students. Many college students and high school students who take classes online merely go through the motion of learning just to get the class completed. The class credit is higher on the priority list then learning.

    Some freedom for students is nice and even has been proven to help promote learning, but it sounds like some people are suggesting a complete lack of structure for learning. I hope that our school systems are not cast aside and replaced with educational chaos.

    Several people have said that Algebra should be taught in 8th grade. The problem I see with that is employers are complaining that kids today can not even count back change correctly. Why would we want to push the kids harder to learn things like algebra when we need to concentrate on more of the basics that they use in everyday life.

    Change will come but not as drastic as predicted in this article.

    • Wittgensteins Beetle

       And this is the most ridiculous pessimism I’ve seen today. PEOPLE ARE NOT ALL 50% APTITUDE AVERAGE SHEEP THAT FOLLOW YOUR CURRENT MODEL OF THE UNIVERSE. Jesus apeshi+ Christ.

      Look at the guy who can average out the rate at which change travels. Change is a constant right? or does that change? Whats the standard rate of change in a magnetic field? or How does change react to sleeping with its sister? I’d ask how much Change is in your pocket but equivocation is a ludicrous method of rhetoric.

  • me here

    Wow, what great predictions! They almost remind me of the “kitchens of the future predictions” where you push a button and a complete gourmet meal is prepared in minutes by hydrating a tiny little cube. Maybe the idea where every person will fly to work or school with their own personal jet pack will come true. 

    Some of the items in the article would be nice but are not very realistic. Students learn far more from being in a classroom with an instructor and other students. Many college students and high school students who take classes online merely go through the motion of learning just to get the class completed. The class credit is higher on the priority list then learning.

    Some freedom for students is nice and even has been proven to help promote learning, but it sounds like some people are suggesting a complete lack of structure for learning. I hope that our school systems are not cast aside and replaced with educational chaos.

    Several people have said that Algebra should be taught in 8th grade. The problem I see with that is employers are complaining that kids today can not even count back change correctly. Why would we want to push the kids harder to learn things like algebra when we need to concentrate on more of the basics that they use in everyday life.

    Change will come but not as drastic as predicted in this article.

  • Hr-wolfe

    With all these great improvements and obsolescence how do you explain the need for more and more remedial training at the collage entry level. It would seem that more than a few Charter schools have had greater sucess dumping the computers and going back to learning the basics and forgetting the indoctronation.

  • Pm

    I’m hoping that lists like these will be obsolete by 2020!

  • http://twitter.com/jhante jhante

    I expect it will take longer than 10 years, given the lack of funding for anything remotely related to education, but I think most of the predictions are dead on.

  • Mike Ziegenhagen

    Really? No one noticed the “Professional Learing (sic) Networks in their back pockets” in #15? Biggest laugh I’ve had all day. This just shows that typos are not going to go away in the 21st century, and neither should good editors (the human kind)!

  • Wandahavila

    I’ve been teaching for 30 years and I agree with several areas.  However, education is big business and I think it will take a bit longer for all schools to incorporate all 21 changes.  Technology is the wave of the future and will be even more affordable in the future, so change is definitely on the horizon.  The usage of Nooks and similar devices is revolutionizing reading in our school.  It’s going to be an exciting ride.

  • student

    this is just a list of things we already know, that won’t happen anytime soon. Sure ebooks instead of textbooks and online testing but that already exists and only because it’s cheaper. New, radical changes are always 5/10 years away and will continue to be as long as money plays a role. In university at least, no one cares about learning. From my experience information is thrown at you and six weeks later you reproduce as much as you can in a test. All they care about is research papers and funding which has nothing to do with good teaching. These things are all technically possible now and will be 10 years from now, but as long as there is no financial incentive they just won’t happen.

  • Debby411

    I am currently teaching an adult evening class that relies on an e-book and on-line homework. The students often complain that it is  a very difficult way to learn. There are glitches in the software and let’s not forget the procrastination factor. That being said, let’s entertain the thought that our students are so much younger. They may be more tech savvy than I will ever be, but they are being introduced to new concepts and will be expected to build upon them. How does that happen when you have little or no hard-copies of materials? No frame of reference for researching independently? I’d like to see Wikipedia pull that one off.
    There are many websites that provide on-line tutorials. How is a child supposed to determine which one will provide the clearest explanation for them? I have yet to see a computer that can differentiate learning to suit a particular student’s needs. Let’s also consider funding the technology for home use. Will it be part of the school budget? NJ already has one of the highest property tax rates in the nation.

  • plotinus

    As a University professor teaching in both the arts and sciences at a research university in Canada, I see the results of about 10 years now of computing in the classroom taking over from actual education and the results are not good.  My colleagues and I are increasingly shocked at the lack of basic literacy and numeracy in our first and second year students.  At most 20% of them can work at a University level.  While I can’t blame computing alone and other communications technologies for this, I am not convinced that new technologies have helped most students at all in developing basic skills of reading, writing and mathematical analysis.  The list of 21 things which will be obsolete is laughable and completely deluded.  The main result of all of this focus on technology as the saviour for education are kids who are shallow, callow and entitled.  Fewer and fewer students appear to be at university to be educated — all they care about is getting a job, and Universities are defrauding them by suggesting that getting a degree will get them a long lasting career. So instead of becoming and educated individual, able to think for themselves, reflect critically and then act on their best interpretations, they graduate as barely employable cogs in the wheels of corporations who use them until they have no more place for their limited skills.

    Technology is not the answer to our problems, it is but a tool.  We must ask more important questions as to what use we will put these tools.

    • http://profile.yahoo.com/RPS6QZ6HLKIMUI3BB5P35QAPI4 Jennifer B

      Our school just started a cyber academy for 6-12th grades.  There is a hub that the students can go to with questions.at the high school.  They can still be a part of school events.  It starts at 6th grade because of what you said, students needs to grasp the basics. Being on the committee board that created this “cyber” school–I prefer the word Hybrid, we were looking at the statistics of special needs/autism.  We are a rural district so the drop out rate is also high.

      • Guest

        like Robin responded I am startled that some one able to get paid $5518 in 4 weeks on the internet. did you see this page w­w­w.K­E­P­2.c­o­m

      • Tim Constantine

        The list of 21 things which will be obsolete is laughable and completely deluded… Technology is not the answer to our problems, it is but a tool. We must
        ask more important questions as to what use we will put these tools.

        I think if you go back and re-read the 21 things you’ll find that these statements contradict. I, and the 21 things, agree with your last statement.

    • Amber Collier

      like Betty responded I am impressed that a person able to get paid $9836 in 4 weeks on the internet. did you see this website w­w­w.K­E­P­2.c­o­m

    • Mike

      Exactly! Your last part sums it up. We can’t look at technology doing the work for us; students will never learn and absorb information that way. Teachers need to stay ahead of students with technology, because I see it time and time again, how much more students know about technology compared to their teachers. That is quite dissapointing. Once teachers, at all levels, learn the correct ways to utilize technology in the classroom, it will fail. I don’t mind learning a few things from my students, but I will make sure they learn a lot more from me.

      • leon Archer

        Every teacher is a student first. I see too many people talk about the schools they have attended. Its not about what you know, its about what you are capable of of learning.(desire, perseverance,ambition… ) Technology?I remember when I first bought a Mac years ago. They never showed me how to cut the dang thing off.(where the off button was located) I did something miraculous-I read the manual. Technology, is created and understood with the basis of our educational system.(letters and numbers create words and binary codes)

        • Nancy Bay

          You forgot “motivation”. Without motivation, being capable of learning has no meaning.

    • Jewels

      I could not agree more. As an elementary teacher of 30 years I’ve noticed that younger teachers and administrators think that technology is the end all tool that will take over where bending over a student’s work, getting to know them, and pushing and pulling them to do their best through hard work and high standards has always worked for me. Technology is a tool like anything else and as quickly as it changes, with no teacher training and no money to train, it’s delusional to think it’s going to be as common place as mentioned let alone effective.

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    • Candi

      I think in some way technology has a way of dumbing us down when we rely on USB’s for memory and in some cases, critical thinking. “Shallow, callow and entitled” is on target.

      • Macmaster

        And we are a lot fatter now that we use cars. Can someone please look up the definition of technology? The questions; Are we preparing students for the 21st-century and a global economy? Do they know how to use the tools of today to Participate in life long learning?

    • Florin

      That’s because you see these as basic skills. They’re not. Just like any skill these can and will be done better by technologies. I think your point of view is not seeing the forest because of the trees. It doesn’t matter how well they can write or do math because these skills are tools as well. You’re just replacing one tool with another. What’s important is how well can they use these tools. I think you should really change your attitude towards this or you’ll end up being a bad teacher.

      • Sue

        I am 67 yo and although I wasn’t the best student I did great in anything other than history and science – really biology. I spent 40+ yrs in the legal field (non-attorney) and was required to actually use skills I learned. Now days communication is a joke, texting has taken the place of talking, kids sit next to each other and text rather than speak. If you don’t use a skill you lose it I.e., spelling – everything fixes itself so you don’t retain the ability. If you play basketball and football you don’t need to read and write in order to go from grade to grade. Shame on us when someone’s athletic ability gets them into college and they can’t read or write, they should be in grammar school until they can. Parents may think they are doing their children a favor, however, their bodies will not last that long, injuries are high and then they want to know where the money is they earned. Because they didn’t learn what they should have they find themselves flat broke because everyone, including family, took advantage of them. So now they’re only good for coaching high school. I applaud those athletes who decide they’re education is more important than the pro sports teams, at least they will have something to turn to when they need it. Needless to say, my son was never allowed to play football even though his father is a sports fanatic.

      • Torrin

        Anyone who believes that reading is not a skill that students need to learn is definitely the one who will end up being a bad teacher. So many people make it through their schooling without learning how to read; when they make it into the work force they are usless to their employers because they can’t even read a manual.

        • H

          Is reading the manual the only way to access it or understand it? Aren’t their other ways to access what is presented in a manual…pretty sure there is a you tube video! The point wasn’t that they don’t need to know how to read, write or have numeracy skills. All of that is important – but what you can do with your skills, and knowledge is far more important and always has been then just being able to read something and spewing it back out. Remember the innovators from all centuries of humanity…they could do way more than just k read and write and regurgitate – they could create, reimagine, problem solve, etc…all the skills that are still required and necessary. What technology has done is changed how human beings go about that process and how far they can take it.

    • alisha652

      as Kenneth implied I didnt know that any one able to make $4124 in one month on the computer. did you look at this web link w­w­w.K­E­P­2.c­o­m

      • tbarseghian

        Deletw

    • lostinthe past

      I am an IT technician in a college in the UK, I have taught IT and electronics when the college was short staffed, I have a teaching qualification, strange that it may seem I actually preferred to teach without using technology as I find that I can interact better with the students and better understand the strengths and weaknesses of individual students, teachers/ lecturers are relying to much on technology these days at times they have sent classes home because a projector or computer isn’t working,makes me wonder how they managed before they had this technology. I could write an entire article on the current state of education, it horrifies me to see the state of education at the moment, you can quote statistics at me all day long but the fact remains we are letting our children down and letting them lose in a world ill prepared and poorly educated.

    • NTG Joe

      The best teacher in school I ever had was my history teacher. Everyone who was his student enjoyed their history class because of the way he taught. Besides the easy to understand and engaging way he taught, we had fun history games, and deep interesting and engaging discussions all the time. At the end of our course, we basically know the whole history curriculum by heart. I’m sure new tech like iPads and smartphones can be used to enhance learning, and I put emphasis on “enhance,” it simply can’t replace a solid fundamental teaching skills.

    • http://rau.3littlefoxes.com/ LindaF

      It’s also easier to fake learning online/with technology. Too many students substitute group projects and Powerpoints for actual knowledge of the content. Students have shakier foundational learning, and are LESS prepared to handle true high school work.

    • H

      Want to talk about entitled, let’s take a look at how backwards so many of our universities are in that they continue to deliver program requirements and process that are so outdated and completely disengaging. People go through hoops set out by pretty entitled and elitist institutions and they that don’t inspire student to engage with their world because students are too busy regurgitating material to make sure they get marks that will allow them to have a piece of paper, that society has deemed as the credential of being an intelligent and worthy citizen.

      So if you truly believe that students are that worthless, let them know that sitting in your class is useless to their growth and how they might contribute to the world. Perhaps then they will be inspired to pursue things that will transform their lives and the lives of others.

      One thing that is not addressed is that high school teachers see students for a lot more than their mark, universities only see the mark…so I challenge to change the system so that all levels of education in Canada begin to do more than maintain the status quo and really think about the critical education that Dewey and Freire have long been fighting for..where learning is life and life is learning…but to all this to transform the individual.

    • AdamTolley

      I like how you introduce your status as an entrenched beneficiary of the current system as qualifications for evaluating the efficacy of new teaching methods.

      Technology has done very little to improve education yet because it is not being used as an engine of change but rather a drop in replacement for practices that are obsolete.

      I look forward to the day we can implement individualized education tracks which focus on mastery instead of racing against curriculum to learn certain skills on-time. Technology makes this possible, just look at Khan Academy.

      What our math classes do to the self esteem of children, especially creative ones, is wrong in a way I struggle to articulate with friendly language. Just moving away from a tempo based approach to teaching such things justifies technology to me, but that’s just one real change it can bring.

      Addressing your claim that kids are shallow, callow, and entitled, ignoring a weak argument that this is all due to a techo-centric educational approach:

      Entitled: Somewhat, but that’s not actually always a bad thing, as these children are often found to be more confident and self assertive (see ‘Outliers’ by Gladwell), but we could probably use more focus on manners.

      More callow: What counts for maturity is hard to pin down. If anything, I would argue kids are growing up too fast. They are also growing up in a system that affords them little industry, and seeing that public school system leaves little time for other activities, I would put that responsibility at its feet.

      Shallow: nope. Maybe more guarded, maybe less patient. But I doubt privileged children have ever been as aware or involved in social issues, unencumbered by local norms, or free to deeply explore those things that they are passionate about. I imagine instead, that they fail your sniff tests for depth which in turn are relegated to a narrow slice of human experience.

      tl;dr:

      1) Technology enables change; experiment, adapt, reconsider, repeat.
      2) Give kids more credit, they certainly deserve it with what they are put through.

  • InYourDreams

    Complete pie in the sky. If 15% of these predictions come true I’ll eat my iPad.

  • Speterkin

    Wow I believe this will come to past.

  • Anonymous

    Obviously written by a high school or early college student whose brain has been fogged by too many video games or facebook time.   Objective aptitude testing will never disappear, although administration of it may become more digitized, ie. direct entry rather than with a scan sheet.   Curriculum will only change by the increase of topics required, since computing skills are an essential adjunct to classic topics.

  • L Standerford

    “Standardized tests obsolete for college admissions” – At least with standardized tests you can feel confident that a greater percentage of students actually took the test because it was verified with an ID (in most cases). With a digital portfolio you will never know who actually created the work — a parent, a friend, or someone the family paid to come up with a beautiful piece of work. The problem with high stakes anything is the greater the stakes are raised, the more effort people will put forth to cheat the system.

  • Chilllstreet

    Number 15-I hope that is professional LEARNING network instead of Learing network…

  • John

    “Nuclear-powered vacuum cleaners will probably be a reality in 10 years.”

    – Alex Lewyt, president of vacuum cleaner company Lewyt Corp., in the New York Times in 1955

    • Wittgensteins Beetle

       “…probably…”

      -some opinion taken out of context that has absolutely no meaning at all to the subject at hand

  • http://twitter.com/HEROsDrTim Tim Springer

    I hesitate to comment – but this list is typical of the technophilia that dominates discussion of learning and technology.  If you examine many of the items on this list it has to do with teaching and administration – not learning.
    The idea that desks will disappear is appealing – but it is built on the notion that schools will no longer me relevant.  This is best summarized by a question, “What do you do with bricks and mortar when the classroom is in the cloud?”  The answer is, get your head out of the clouds and understand that technology is a tool; learning is situated and  social and schools and classrooms and teachers (and even paper) have a critical and valuable role to play – just different from today.
    BTW – office world has been predicting the “paperless” office for 50 years – it’s about as practical as the paperless bathroom – you can build it but is it better?  Paper is a very friendly medium.
    Finally, Peter Drucker said, “Trying to predicting the future is like driving down a highway at night, backwards, with your eyes closed.”  While fun to try to predict the future ultimately it’s a fools game.

  • Richie Rich

    It seems to me that some of these predictions will come to pass sooner for some schools, and later for others. Some predictions will take many more years to realize change if possible. I can see educational computing leading the change for classrooms without walls and facilitated teaching for 24/7 learning. The key to change will be in the attitudes of those with the power to make change possible.

    Clement Stone once said “You are a product of your environment. So choose the environment that will best
    develop you toward your objective. Analyze your life in terms of its environment. Are the things around you helping you toward success – or are they holding you back?”

    As you review the top 21 things that will be obsolete by 2020, ask yourself, am I creating an environment that will help to lead positive change for the future of our students education, and the future of my peers?

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_3C46NH66OZLIBXUW3ZCLRW663E Erutan409

    Yeah that’s all well and great, but I know some businesses are still using Windows 2000 or even earlier.  Saying it’s going to happen isn’t the same as it will happen because someone published this on the Internet.

    This reminds me of the sarcastic rhetoric like: “It’s not official unless it’s on facebook!”

  • http://www.facebook.com/emmanuel.garces Emmanuel Garces Medina

    Large keyboards and screens will still be needed. It is hard to make software directly to a handhel

  • http://www.rackmountsales.com/1U_20_Rackmount_Monitor_p/rm-116-1u.htm 1U Rackmount LCD

    That shows better use of time without extending days has a bigger effect.

     

    • Wittgensteins Beetle

      can days be made longer? that is fucking incredible…. We just blast the earth a few million miles away from the Sol correct?

  • Yamum

    everyone has AIDS but me

  • http://www.promoteamsrbija.rs/ Izrada web sajtova

    Thanks for everything you do on this blog.
    Revizija

  • Wittgensteins Beetle

    #8 and #21: I sincerely doubt this will happen in the next 100 years. However any sort of wager to the contrary will be meaningless unless my #22 occurs… Transhumanism: Enhancing the human way of life through technology.

    In reality; we cannot possibly know anything (Fallibilism and the incredible diverity in Epistemic Contextualism) but it IS fun to blog as if we do.

  • OSU47

    I would love to know how many of you have actually spent time in classrooms recently and how many of you just go around condemning education based on what politicians and reporters say? People who have absolutely no training in education- parenting yes, educating no. As a parent myself I know there’s a huge difference.

    For starters- homeschooling is NOT the solution. Check your statistics, over 50% of them don’t make it into DI or DII colleges and the ones that do have an even lower success rate when it comes to staying there. Most are not academically prepared and even fewer are socially/ emotionally prepared.

    The author of this article is dead on. And if you HADrecently spent time in schools, or at least ones that are constantly evolving as they should, you would find 1,2,6,7,13,14,15,20,21 already happening!!! Yes, I teach. Obviously since I care. And no, it isn’t because I can’t do anything else since I had scholarships to Vanderbilt, Emory, Notre Dame. I teach because I truly believe this is what I should be doing.

    I can even say #20 is on the move. Last year I had 13 fifth graders qualify to take pre- algebra as 6th graders and 9 of them will take Algebra in the 2012/2013 year as 7th graders, 10 more from that class will take pre-algebra as 7th graders/ Algebra as 8th graders, and only 3 will not take Algebra until high school. Oh, and by the way, 92% OF MY STUDENTS FALL BELOW THE POVERTY LINE! My students live in the square mile in town with the highest rate of domestic violence. Over 2/3 speak a different language at home.

    So please stop!! Don’t tell me how awful all schools and all teachers are!! We are succeeding despite the messes parents send to school and the ways politicians bind our hands!

    • http://profile.yahoo.com/RPS6QZ6HLKIMUI3BB5P35QAPI4 Jennifer B

        Since most schools are competing for students, more and more cyber schools have popped up via local public school systems, In essence, you are homeschooling your child (supporting the article above). That aside, just as you do not like that you are bashed being a  public school teacher, and being cut down for the job you do, a SINCERE home schooling family does not like you doing the same thing to them!  Reread your comment.There are a lot of messed up cases coming out of either method  (both should just respect each other). There are also success stories.  Minus the religious edge that some take with homeschooling, most do so because of special or emotional needs.  They wouldn’t be successful in a public school, in the first place, because of that special need! Let’s face it, with 1 in 88 in Autism Spectrum, most schools are NOT equipped to deal with all of the faces of Autism, let alone any other special need out there!.   Both of my children are in public school.  I actually school of choice my daughter to the next school district, because my local one doesn’t meet her creative needs. I like to believe that not all children are cookie cutter:-)
        

    • Anonymous

      Whoohoo! Here here, osu47! Enough with all the clueless civilians who think Having attended school makes them an expert in education. An understandable mistake mind you, but god forbid any of these armchair pundits spend a year in the classroom. They’d understand the difficulty and the reality of the classroom. And yes, the real job starts at home. Don’t let tv raise ur kids, and let ‘em know they have to engage and show respect. It takes a village to raise a healthy citizen, and a good teacher can do so much more with a student who’s an open channel than one who just expects adults to hand them treats for basic behavior and stick them in front of a screen to appease them.

      • Wittgensteins Beetle

         I drove by a school once, does that make me a gangster, an expert on “drive bys” and an excellent driver?

        TV does a decent job, they watch enough shows in class anyway. Social interaction is teh only reason to put them in school. The fact that they learn basic spelling and maths are just bonuses. Otherwise you learn virtually NO EARTHLY USABLE SKILLS

        • Katrina

          Just curious, how many kids do you have?

          • Wittgensteins Beetle

             3, sometimes 5 or more at a time. You?

        • Jewels

          Your perception of school makes me think you have a thick skull and a marble rolling around inside of it. That was my perception.

      • watchsun

        I learnt more from TV than from my high school. In my country high school teaches nothing but academic stuff.

        • teacher

          Too bad you didn’t learn that “learnt” isn’t A WORD!!

          • rick

            good one…lol

          • Alex

            Except for “learnt” is a word, just not a word used in your safe bubble of the US.

          • TassieTiger

            That’s right, it isn’t a ‘Merican word. It is English, though.

          • mray2b1

            In Britain they say “Learnt” not in the US though

          • Jack Yuen

            This ethnocentric attempt to mock watchsun is a great example of the inability of the teacher’s to teach.

      • leon Archer

        Stop it!!!! The real job got to take place at school. The children attend school, not home. Let me re-engineer what you are actually saying. The school is not going to get better until the homes get better. The real problem is inside the heads of the adults who are in charge of the children. Question? Are you teaching the children, or, are the children teaching you?

    • Jo

      Your stats on homeschooling is wrong and you sound like you know everything. I would not want you teaching my children or anyone’s for that matter No you are not succeeding. It is the student. Also I don’t appreciate that you put all parents in the same category.
      Oh and I am really impressed by your scholarships. NOT!
      I think if we are still here you will be very surprised by what is happening in 2020.

      • Ryszard

        Just as a matter of interest, do you homeschool your children ?

      • TassieTiger

        I have a feeling that if the rate of failure of OSU47s class was particularly high you would say the children’s failures are his/her fault, especially if those results deviate from the norm of what his/her classes’ should be achieving given their socioeconomic backgrounds. Would you agree with that?

        If you do agree, then how does his/her students’ successes not reflect on quality teaching?

      • A Teacher

        Can you put some complete thoughts together please? Or were you just so excited and impassioned by your statements that you really didn’t make much sense?

        • stacey johnson

          u are a great teacher!!!

    • leon Archer

      Listen we trusted the system, and yes too many system across the country failed our children. If you teach, good for you. But, your altitude is a problem. We don’t care how smart you are. You can’t hide behind your pass credentials no more. This country is looking for effective teachers. Simply put, she(student)can’t read, fix her. He can’t count fix him. Dragging students over a pre-set curriculum, and giving a grade is over. Homeschooling, put more pressure on the public school system to get their act right.

    • bulldogvillan

      It appears that your “statistics” about homeschooling and college were pulled from the ether.

      http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-505145_162-37242551/can-homeschoolers-do-well-in-college/

      You don’t receive training in education. You receive training in schooling. If you were adept at education, you would know that the school system is setup in such away that is the antithesis of the way novices learn.

    • Guest

      I am a parent that has recently been in school and our school is staying on top of the technology that is available. I have seen that it is a tool and if they keep eleminating more and more of traditional teaching in about 25 years we will not have students that can take part in the world. They will be far behind because we are more concerned about making sure we are advancing technically than educationally. I have done a substitute teacher in many of our surrounding schools and it is amazing how many students turn to calculators or computers or the ever present smart phone to get their answers. We are not building smart well rounded students, we are building electronic dependence. No more thinking for yourself let your device do it, because someone else has already learned how and put it in this more trendy format.

    • Momof7

      I have homeschooled/am homeschooling all seven of my children. Five have graduated, did well on their SAT’s, attended/are attending university. They are competent students, and in one case, a successful business man. Homeschool did not in any way detract from their ability to learn in college, and in fact may have helped them with the ability to learn independently. They are technically competent, and have a well-rounded education in the classics as well as science, math, and the arts. Don’t quote statistics that are not true.
      And, just so you know, I have nothing against teachers. I admire them, and even love some of them (my daughter-in-law is a teacher), and think they have a very difficult job. I appreciate the job you are doing. But this does not give you the right to make blanket statements about other school options.

  • Educatorforlife

    New and upgraded technology is the trend outside of the public schools’ walls–unfortunately so many public schools are behind in what they have as technology for student-use and teacher implementation that it makes preparation for 21st Century Skills extremely difficult. I teach in a portable classroom-(we call portable city) where there is no wi-fi.  My students can only take notes on their cellphones, if they have one. We have limited laptops and I doubt we have a class set of Ipads. My school is in a very large urban school district and within the suburbs; I can only imagine what smaller, rural schools have to offer in the area of technology.
     

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000759196613 Alisa Hamilton Ricketts

    I had to laugh at #7.  I totally agree with the author of this article about Wikipedia.  My son had a teacher who absolutely REFUSED to let her students peruse this site.  I thought that was very strange, but, then again, she was a strange teacher.

    • Blondundrocvr86

      Wikipedia isn’t a creditable source, you or I can change information whenever we please. It makes sense not being able to use it.

      • Andrea

         I agree that it is not a great source. However, I think students should be able to use Wikipedia. There is a difference between using the website for a quick idea or understanding of something and using it for research. My students may use Wikipedia for research if they are using it to find other research (source list on the bottom of the pages) or they have many other sources which back up their information in research.

        • Wittgensteins Beetle

           What IS a credible source then? The bible? Gimme a fucking break. You cannot EVER know anything AT ALL except that you have thoughts… so get a second and third opinion… if all three happened to be wrong then I guess your incorrect comprehension was determined. I couldnt blame you for trying though. Using Wiki is more credible than many sites that SPECIALIZE in information.. WebMD, CNN, etc etc

          • Lydia

             A credible source is one that has been peer-reviewed by other professionals in the field to verify its credibility. Wikipedia is a good place to start for information but should not be the end of it. It will link to more credible websites/sources usually at the bottom. And this will oftentimes include (gasp) books. Wikipedia is a valuable tool to get very shallow knowledge and should be treated as a stepping stone to more in depth learning.

  • Agrijag1

    Some of this is wrong…. IT Security is going to do even better…. Who’s going to secure all that WiFi, sattellite, and all of those cloud technologies? 

    • Agrijag1

      satellite* My bad 

      • Wittgensteins Beetle

         haha You misspelled a work, all comments by you are discredited… J/K… maybe

        • Wittgensteins Beetle

           
          word*.. Damned left hand doing what the right hand didnt done did do not nary none never how.

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/BXBBNVYOMBVY6QMJUCARCSLQAQ Andreas Floer

    So in 2020 every high school will be located in an affluent suburb and every student graduating high school will go to university seeking a degree in graphic design?

    • Wittgensteins Beetle

       Or we’ll all be homeschooling the kids. Its cheaper to stay at home and tech our kids with government money handouts than it is to work our asses off paying a daycare center $30 a day, having to go over our childs schoolwork packet for the day EVERY NIGHT ANYWAY because teachers dont want to do their jobs. Yet we’re supposed to have teachers as our role models.

      Art is on its way out, Its survival and functionality. Nobody cares about what you think or say on facebook, its all about how you deal with life and how smart you are to attain that next metaphysical plateau of neomena

  • Wittgensteins Beetle

    Maybe its Noumena

    Noone cares.

    I suggest you teach your children at home. Martial arts, Problem solving and consequence prediction, how to UNDERSTAND the written word; Logic, Grammar and Mathematics. I think thats about it… Lock picking and the proper way to run wont hurt, either.

    Schools are failing (atleast the US ones). We cant even appropriate gun laws and see through politician bullshit in this country. Lets just vote for the black guy cuz Im not racist! Whatever. Enjoy your $2000 fine for not using obama care… May as well give it to the EBT Welfare jambrony down the street with gold teeth, a rolex and 400 tattoos who has already taught his kids how to jump a fence with a flat screen while your day care provider teaches us that watching 3 kids a day earns more than what daddy makes.

    • Innocent by stander

      This idiot uses a term, “Wittgensteins Beetle” to describe himself and he does not even have a grasp of what it means.

      You missed represented yourself so all comments by you are discredited…

  • T_tucker69

    Ah, the paperless classroom…is that anything like the paperless office?

    • pojithya

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    • Jo

      I agree! The office I worked in was suppose to be paperless, let us see oh about 18 years ago! :)

  • http://www.facebook.com/jppoundstone Neil Harris

    Your predictions are so arrogant in a way. You speak about them as if they are your ‘opinions’ and it’s how YOU want it to occur and if others aren’t on-board with you, then they are ‘out-to-lunch’. Don’t be so incredibly cocky. Chill out!

    • Jo

      I agree

  • clancy

    Unless the oil runs out, or the economy collapses along with society as we know it, then for the lucky ones, life will be as it was about 100 years ago. Much of the present populus would not survive such an event of course. It could happen.

  • Wittgensteins Beetle

    #8 and #21 still make me laugh; I remember when the computer was implemented in offices to ELIMINATE paper usage…. Yet it TRIPLED it… Blogging conjecture is far different than conceptualized fact. However thats just my opinion based upon induction. Good day

  • http://trevor.dekoekkoek.net Trevor de Koekkoek

    I hope you’re right about #18. I doubt it though. The rest are either wishful thinking or downright silly.

  • Curtis

    Yet another list of future events. Where is my jet pack and vacations on Mars? I have been an educator for 25 years. I respectfully disagree with some things on your list. Education is changing, but technology is not taking over. We are realizing that that human factor in student development is essential.

  • Matthew Augeri

    Desktops will never become obsolete. They will always be more powerful.

  • Brent

    I’m particularly interested in #5 – the decline and fall of Standardized Tests. Do you have any evidence or articles where we can get more information about this?

  • Anam Paiseanta

    This article is shortsighted. Public ( government ) school is already completely obsolete. It is still here because the infrastructure and paradigm haven’t been dismantled yet, and because the state hasn’t come up with a more efficient way to brainwash such large batches pf people.

  • Khaliqur Rahman

    Some e-ducation!

  • Lesley Grant

    I remember a similar list in the nineties that predicted such open learning models for well before this – classrooms without walls, schools becoming those home-based for learning, etc. Hasn’t happened yet. A for paper consumption, evidence and my experience shows that students still want to print out their work, information, etc. and don’t like e text books. Give them a hard copy any day.

  • tjjteacher

    Scary – better get upskilling…!

  • leon Archer

    I love the article! But one caution to consider, I will never trust the idea of letting someone disconnect me from the original text, or book. Humans beings, have the propensity to re-write information with their take included, forever altering the original thought of the author.
    Most of the professionals in the field of education is in trouble. The children don’t never longer days in school. The professionals don’t know how to build a system, or haven’t figured a model, that will educate our children in the alloted time.

  • Berdj Rassam

    Amused, I guess, by the thought that there won’t even be desks or IT departments (in this land of technology).

  • http://priveyo.com/ Priveyo

    In third world countries this is far from happening and I think even in the most advanced countries.

  • susieq19642002

    What will happen to the baby-sitting role that schools now play? More parents staying home with them?

  • Sandy Gieber

    You had me at
    “DESKS”- “Allow the network-based concepts of flow and collaboration…”

  • Aksel Kargård Olsen

    We are using far more paper now, after the paperless office was introduced. A lot easier to print a 20 page document than to write it in short hand. And I am not sure how much of a scare wikipedia really is right now.

  • http://blog.rrchapman.us/ Bob Chapman

    Grade levels were going to disappear in the 1960s or 1970s. Still waiting.

    The ability to do Algebra isn’t a function of when it is presented in school. It is a function of when the student is able to move from concrete to formal skills (Piaget). Don’t count on technology speeding up emotional development in this way. There is no reason for these skills to develop faster.

  • songnverse

    So basically, we are lazier than ever. Nice. smh.

  • mindib

    This emphasis on technology assumes that schools that have been decimated by budget cuts and can’t afford basic supplies can miraculously afford said technology. I have a Promethean board in my room. Can’t afford to replace the light bulb on everyone’s burnt out ones. My major source of technology is thus gone.

  • Tigger

    A lot have talked about online schools. I have heard nothing good about them. You have to stay on top of your kids and know the work they are doing. Homeschooling Is great if and only if parents do the work involved. It is all too often kids home alone and no.supervision. I know there are parents great at it and I applaud you. I have had 4 come to my class from homeschooling and only 1 was on grade level. So 1 out of 4 In my professional experience is not good! The rest will work in affluent schools and that leads to what college is becoming a place for the wealthy. Kids following interests? That is funny. So no kid needs to learn to read? None need to learn basic math? No history? Which if we do not learn from we are doomed to repeat! This is almost as laughable as out socialist tendencies in Washington, except it is not funny.

  • Jill Shearburn-persinos

    If you are one of the ones posting that these “tools” of today’s classrooms are not going the way of the Dodo then you need to connect the link and read the rationale behind these predictions.
    As a Professional Educator who studies and lives the Psychology of Learning I am in agreement with much of what is in the article and the articles in the connected link. Technology is ironically moving us back towards the more experiential educational approaches…which is only a natural evolution.

  • Shelly

    What about SOCIAL SKILLS? MANNERS? INTERACTIONS? since texting, facebook and other media has taken over, these have gone down drastically or away completely. No more “Please may I” or “Thank you” or “Excuse me”. And I have GREAT kids but the technology is so shortened that their speech is too. And the LANGUAGE skills are almost obliterated along with writing sentences. I’m just worried technology will take the place of too much . . . . .

  • Dave Chronister

    Cloud computing makes worrying about security a thing of the past. Wow, someone needs to stop listening to marketing campaigns and actually understand technology. The kids coming out of schools these days believe being a power user and technically saavy are one in the same. The apple-lization of technology is killing our industry.

  • markwguay

    Ahhh (sigh of relief). So nice to see an actual case scenario of how school will have to be redefined to be successful and said in a positive way. Thanks for the witty and fun envision here. I’m on board and paddling right with you.

  • Sarah

    So basically, we’ll be losing everything Common Core stands for…

  • mray2b1

    This is the vision of upper middle class white people. Students are differentiated, many have computers and tech at home and parents who can help them and many do not. In terms of on-line learning, just about every university and high school student that I have spoken to about it DOES NOT LIKE IT. The only thing they like about it is the flexible time of the class. Whoever is writing this list doesn’t seem to have actually spent much time teaching.

    The printing of paper in most schools has increased the more we use computers, not less. I agree with the Algebra except I believe we need an integrated consumer math class so students have a place to actually learn about the economy.
    Parent teacher conferences abolished, you must not be a parent or teacher, parents love this night and want MORE of them not less.
    I do like the idea of grade levels not based upon age, that makes sense to me to a certain degree.
    Desks I like them and so do students, students like their place in class. Seating should be flexible.

  • B Cooper

    You know what else is going to be obsolete if this list proves true: conversation, social skills, and children who now how to function when the power is out. There is something to be said for doing it “old school” every now and then.

  • steve

    22. Teachers

  • Andrea Reinsmoen

    This kind of goes with some of what others said, but yes, there is a lot of info that students can get through tech tools, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that students know info fluency (how to find the correct information), critical thinking (how to use the information to some common good), and I can continue talking about the 21st century skills. Language labs being eliminated…yes, but students just learning from mobile devices? Not if we don’t teach them the skills on how to learn a language, so if mobile devices is the way, we need to change our way of teaching languages now!

  • bibliophibian

    This was a depressing list to read.

  • Anabel Samsom

    I am Miss Ananbel.,From united states of America.I will start by saying to all that have experience heart break and also can’t do with out there lover should please stop here and read up my story, So as you will know how to go solving or getting your ex back from this spell caster..AND AGAIN I WILL WANT TO ALSO TELL ALL THAT THIS SPELL CASTER I WILL WANT TO TELL THE WHOLE WORLD ABOUT IS HARMLESS AND DO NOT HAVE ANY SIDE EFFECT, BUT TO RESTORE AND GIVE YOU BACK WHAT YOU DESERVE, COS WHEN I MEET WITH THIS SPELL CASTER THAT WAS INTRODUCED TO ME BY THE WIFE OF MY BOSS IN MY WORKING PLACE, SHE MADE IT CLEAR THAT HE CAN CAST SPELL ON SO MANY OTHER PROBLEMS EXCEPT IN GETTING YOUR EX OR MAKING YOUR LOVER TO LOVE YOU MORE THAT WILL SUITE YOU. Last year December, My lover was cheating on me and was not also give me the attention that a man should give to a woman,And really that was troubling my mind and tearing my heart apart to the extent that i was not concentrating in the office the way i use to before the break up by my lover.And before that incident,I always see how my boss use to love his wife so much. I was binging to think that i was not doing the right thing to him that will make him love me forever,So i really gathered my courage and went to my boss wife office to ask her the secret that made her husband love her so dearly,In the first place she refused in telling me,She asked me why i am asking her such a question,That if is it not normal for every man to love his wife.I told her the reason that made me ask her about this question,That my lover started cheating on me lately,When i knelt down before her for her to see my seriousness in this issue that i went to ask her,She opened up to me by telling me that i should not tell anybody about what she want to tell me,The wife to my boss started to say to me that she used a very powerful spell on his husband to love her,And the spell that she used is harmless, But the spell is just to make him love her and never to look for any other woman except her. I QUICKLY ASK HER HOW DID SHE GET TO KNOW THIS GREAT,POWER,DURABLE AND PERFECT WORK SPELL CASTER,she said that a friend of hers also introduce her to him. Then i also ask her how i can meet with this spell caster.SHE SAID EVERYTHING TO ME,THAT THE NAME OF THIS SPELL CASTER IS Dr. Areghan .My next question to her was how can i get this wonderful spell caster,She said she is going to give me the email of the spell caster for me to contact him for my problem,Really she gave to me this spell caster email and i contacted him and explained all to him,And after every thing that needed to be done by the spell caster, In the next two days, My lover that hated me so much came to house begging for forgiveness and i was so glad that i have finally gotten my heart desire..I was so grateful to this spell caster for what he has done for my life.. So i made a promise to him that i will always continue telling the world about his wonderful work towards me and also to other that came to you before and also the people that will also get to you from my story that i narrated on line now..I will want to say to the entire world that you should not cry over noting again, That there is a great man that has been helping individuals to restore there Joy and smile in there faces !! The direct email to get this man is : getyourspelltemple@hotmail.com ,This is what i want to tell you all out there,That is thinking that all hope is lost OK..Thanks

  • Virtual Dan

    If we keep going down this road, we’ll all have virtual jobs and virtual pay-checks. These ideas all lead to everyone losing their job. See you in 20 years jobless.

  • Charles Darwin

    univ of california

    univ of texas

    univ of michigan.

    post online for free free free.

    public colleges with public tax momey. post online for free free free.

    Tax money paid for all of it… post online for free free free.

    public tax money on public land with public tax money… post for free free free….

  • Charles Darwin

    university of california

    university of michigan

    university of texas.

    public colleges on public land with tax money….

    post all lectures/research online for free free free.

    tax money paid for it. post online for free free free…

  • www.rethinkfirst.com

    Hopefully we will be able to add “special education” to this list once all instruction is personized and differentiated!

  • Ceez

    This is trash. Are you kiddingme? Why do you say that schools not
    using the newest technolgy will be irrelevant? There are good schools
    now, and these good schools won’t be any much less just because they
    don’t robotize themselves like the ones you are counting on to do so.

  • durba_g@yahoo.com

    leaving an example of this (a vision in the process of being realised) in faraway villages of eastern India, where the target is first-generation learners: http://www.futuresociety.org.in/

    Durba

  • Robert Kyle Grooters

    I’m confused as to why you think Graphic and web design companies will be obsolete? There is a lot more to graphic/web design than just knowing the programs and the tech. In fact kids do a lot of peoples graphic design in the present day and for the major part it all sucks. They might know the programs, but that doesn’t translate to being a good designer. That is a skill that is continuously learned, and not on a whim. It’s a deliberate study and passion like most professions. That’s like saying if I wanted a written piece I’ll have my kid do it. They know how to use a word processor. so the day of the hired written should be on the list as well.

    People will always seek the top creative talent in the world, and the top creative talent will always hire the technically skilled to bring their visions to work.

    Lawyers are more likely to be obsolete in the future. With the police state coming and America accepting the belief of guilty till proven innocent (unless it’s a celebrity or politician) they’ll be no need for legal defense.

  • stacey johnson

    they need to put books on there …..gosh!

  • Javi

    I think the point #3 works for everything. “Foreign language acquisition is only a smartphone away”. “Maths acquisition is only a smartphone away.” “Grammar acquisition is only a smartphone away.”

  • Pops

    I think before any of this actually happens in high school, middle school, elementary school, the American university has to decide that they do not want to steal money from students by forcing remedial classes. The first two years of college are spent, in excess, doing busy work rather than learning one’s actual major.

  • Anaconda

    “Books will soon be obsolete in the public
    schools… Our school system will
    be completely changed inside of ten years.”
    Thomas Edison said this in an interview in 1913! The New York Dramatic Mirror in
    July 1913.
    I think on most points, the author of this article is going to be proved very wrong.

  • Skeptical teacher

    Sorry, but I haven’t seen these changes happening in most schools in some Latin American countareis, and don’t anticipate many of them taking place any time soon either. Maybe in 50 years?

    • Skeptical teacher

      I meant “countries”, sorry about that.

  • solexy

    Plotinus is right. What is even more disturbing is that now we think STANDARDIZED TESTING for a third of a school year is considered to be an accurate way to monitor/measure teachers success. It is not about how the student’s learn or what their talents lean towards. It is about politicians trying to privatize schools and cash in. The quality and the diversity is being lost. There is also the issue of the increase in the students with Autism Spectrum(1 in 55 now!) and how little is done to change how we teach to how children are learning. How are we preparing students for life after high school and what kind of society will they be graduating to? I don’t believe that computers can take the place of teachers. You learn so much more from other humans face to face. We learn how to interact and relate to others by interacting. Computers are masks. People pretend and fabricate life experiences on the computer. It is not a substitute for education.

  • solexy

    One more point. When I went through school it was always emphasized that we had to site our sources for credibility. We used sources that could stand behind their statements and back them with solid facts. The Internet has no standard. There is no penalty for posting false information. It is mostly one giant BLOG. Using it as a resource is often abused. So few of my students know the difference between legit sources and opinions. It’s frustrating. Media awareness is necessary and teachers SHOULD NOT allow sites like Wikipedia.

    • guest

      My last year of college (just recently) our professor refused to allow ANY internet sources for our reports. I was frustrated, but it was also the first time that I ever set foot in the campus library so I could collect sources for my report. Without her rule, I would have gone my entire college education without ever using the campus library once. I agree, students need to learn how to source books and legitimate resources.

  • Herper Derperton

    So many words – so few actual concepts.

    I want to be totally clear that I’m speaking as a college instructor (adjunct…let’s not get too excited) who is quite excited about the possibilities of technology in the classroom, but most of this sounds like the worst sort of top-down tech rah-rah…counter-revolutionary consumerist claptrap.

    “Hey, we don’t need schools, you can just learn at home, and since you’re learning at home, you don’t really need teachers, and since you don’t have teachers, you don’t need curricula, and since there’s no curricula, shut up, peasant, and do what the existing power structure tells you to do.”

  • Kosta Naumov

    Hmm! Nice step into the future. What is needed however is a “Giant Leap!” Still too much focus on how we teach rather than what we teach. Still too much focus on Vocational training. The Giant Leap that needs to be taken needs to reexamine the purpose of learning and how it can help us have a more gratifying and productive life. We can then tailor education to facilitate such learning. Otherwise we are just spinning our wheels in the mud. Knee deep in consumption+greed+ego+me!

  • Matthew Zip Irvin

    This is just plain silly. You NEED to take an algebra class before you take statistics. What does this author think that statistics are, anyway? Do you think that they have these sorts of ” lists’ in Korea and Singapore, where the students are blowing the doors off of students in the United States? This myopically glib view of the ” wonders of technology” does not take into consideration the limits imposed by the hegemony of the cable industry on broadband speed( or the lack of it) in comparison to virtually every other developed country, or the ever-growing digital divide. Individualized learning? What is this nonsense? I was bad at math growing up, but, by the by, I damned sure needed to learn it( I have a Ph.D. and use math all of the time in the classroom) The university professor from Canada below is right on target with their assessment of dwindling literacy and numerancy.

  • mud

    The NRA wants each teacher and student to have a assault rifle. Well at least everyone will have to carry a pistol…..

  • Debbie

    Oh you sweet people. You all have overlooked the elephant in the room. You are assuming that all of your students will have those lovely little toys available to them. That their parents should get them or the school districts will provide them. Cafeteria food? For some children this is the only meal they ever eat. They barely have clothes to wear and you are talking major bucks on tech. Even if they took the tech home to work on, there is no guarantee that it won’t get taken by another family member and sold for cash. Wake up. This is 2014 and the poverty level children are just as much with us as they ever were and the upper class is still ignoring them when they make their grandious plans for the future. And NOT ONCE has anyone addressed the needs of the special needs child, that is, the Downs child or similar mental condition, the handicapped, or other minority interest group. Because none of you notice them! But the teachers of this country DO!

  • MicheJ30

    As a math teacher (on two continents over the last 15 years) all I can really add to this discussion is that the person who wrote this contradicts herself within the scope of her piece suggesting that Algebra should be moved to middle school entirely but that organization of classes should be based on “interest”. There would be no middle school, right? so there would be no “high school” either and students would take the courses appropriate for their brain development at a given time which for some high school aged students, IS the abstract thinking that is presented and practiced in a good Algebra 1 class. Because not everyone is ready for the deep analysis in Algebra 1 that we would like to share and practice – anyone can do the algorithm that most people think of algebra as, but to get to the heart of it, to think and talk and delve into the depths of Algebra and why we study it isn’t accessible to all 12 year olds.

  • Shannon

    I love the “learning will be 24/7″…Learning has been 24/7 and always will be. What you’re bringing to the forefront is the very thing that is plaguing Americans today. They are working 24/7 if they are doing ANY kind of job that requires skills. On call on their phones, their computers, work becomes the central focus of life and people are stressed with something “impacting” them all the time. Email, chronically checking messaging, unable to go on vacation because it’s an instantaneous world. What we really need is to figure out how to develop ourselves as people because THAT skill is what makes for well-rounded individuals with interests that cross over and change fields. Instead, we’re creating drones. And I don’t see anything you listed above that doesn’t further the Wall-E world.

  • jcb

    Obviously the person writing this does not understand the reason for Algebra-not for math skills but for learning thinking skills. It is needed along with Geometry for learning logic and problem solving whether or not you are headed to be a math major. Also the brain has to hit the right developmental point to understand the abstract ideas of algebra to learn it. Memorizing formulas in earlier grades does not teach algebra and the purpose it has in our educational system. Some of these items may be the future but the more we get away from learning with others and only via IT, we become a colder society and lose the social skills needed to survive .

    • guest

      you just solved for me why i repeatedly failed algrebra 1 from 8th grade to 12th grade when they finally decided i no longer had to keep taking it, and aced geometry. i’m an extremely logical, analytical thinker. i am NOT abstract. algebra made ZERO sense to me and seemed to constantly contradict itself therefore i could never understand it. geometry made all the sense to me in the world and was incredibly easy. no teacher could ever explain algebra to me as they sounded like they were speaking gibberish and kept changing the rules.

  • Oliver Paladin

    If we would all spend less time writing our professional comments and more time clicking on the advertising to the right of the article, we would all realize the true purpose of the article. Now let me get back to buying something on Amazon. http://bit.ly/1lSW3GK

  • Really?

    I will believe it when I see it. Not disagreeing with this necessarily, but not sure this is what is going to happen within the next 6 years…

  • Miles Turner

    I love the edgy, slightly sarcastic and indicting tone of this article. So let me respond in kind. But please note that 7 of the 21 I agree with. I’m not cynical, just a realist.

    1. Desks will be gone? But where will the students set their computers?

    2. Language Labs replaced by smart phones? Right, the U.S. has such a great track record of learning foreign languages.

    3. Computing via handhelds – sure if all they do is Text, Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat, etc.

    4. Homework gone – yup, this is true – but not because it has no worth, because the students refuse to do it.

    5. Standardized tests gone – agreed, and about time too.

    6. Tech is not necessary for differentiation, time is.

    7. “Get over myself” from fear of Wikipedia? – Where have you been? I’ve been using it for years.

    8. Bye-bye books? Not gonna happen. Scoff all you want.

    9. Bio scans? Hi there Big Brother! Public is sure gonna embrace this one – not!

    10. Lockers gone? O.K. I’m good with this.

    11. IT Depts. Gone? Nope, they will be bigger than ever.

    12. No centralized institutions? That could hurt the football program, couldn’t it?
    Bye-bye extra-curricular.

    13. No more grade levels? I doubt it, but more for social reasons than educational.

    14. Now this one I like, but I wonder where all the money will come from?

    15. I like this one too. No more gurus with résumés in the past tense.

    16. Bye-bye Curricular norms? Bye-bye common knowledge.

    17. 50/50 on this one. “Helicopter” parents will drive the schools; the rest will remain as uninvolved as always.

    18. Hallelujah!

    19. OK. No biggie. They are doing it now.

    20. They will all take Algebra in Middle school? Happening now. Just ask a H.S.
    Algebra teacher how well they learned it.

    21. “In ten year’s time schools will reduce their paper consumption by 90%?” Nope.
    That’s what they said ten years ago. Computers increased consumption.

  • jp

    We can only hope journalism-by-lists will be gone even sooner.

  • cathypauline

    *Yawn*. How incredibly, boringly, technocratic. The real revolution will come when we focus on what kids are doing and feeling and excited about–instead of the twiddly tools they’re using, or the twiddly tools we’re using on them.

  • Sherm

    In other words….education gets worse and produces more illiterate and under achieving kids. North American is in trouble.

  • Michael

    This reads like a wish list not a prediction of things to come. Or your optimism relies on ignoring the pace of education thus far.

  • Michelle Sollicito

    Maybe I am lucky but this all seems to be happening at my kids school already!

  • http://www.thefunclass.com/ Jeff Underhill

    Thank you for your post, Ms. Blake-Plock. Your forward-looking attitude is much appreciated by educators – like myself – who are looking at where education should go. I read your thoughts as where we should go, while comments below lend a bit of pragmatism and “the past reveals the future” understandings.

    This practitioner’s view:

    1. Desks must change, yes! I would not buy a desk for a classroom unless it was height-adjusting to become a standing desk, on wheels or otherwise easily mobile, and smaller for flexibility.

    2. Desktops have no place in the classroom anymore. Laptops, tablets, and – yes! – mobile phones need to be integrated.

    3. See #2.

    4. Homework has never worked. See the research. Students who learn for life – a new mindset – is critical.

    5. Ever proctored a standardized test? The mind-numbing uselessness and private-industry profit-drive reeks through and through.

    6. Differentiated expectations of students are what’s needed. Students are not the same. Then teachers can differentiate.

    7. Agreed.

    8. Ereading devices have come a long way in a short time, and they will come further.

    9. Attendance should be location based, a checkin through mobile device. Done. A teacher chore nomore.

    10. Agreed.

    11. Disagreed. IT professionals will be more and more necessary to maintain the infrastructure.

    12. Schools as satellite homebases, rather than cumbersome institutions, sounds about right.

    13. Students creating collaboratively, forming interest-based groups. Yes, please.

    14. Education schools need to be cutting-edge. And they’re not. Concurrently, they must maintain tried-and-true best practice training.

    15. Teachers teaching teachers. More, please. Educators like myself fail to realize our potential when school leaders fail to listen and prioritize self-driven-PD.

    16. Yes, that is the defunct norm continued by defunct leaders.

    17. Parents-as-learners-and-leaders. Yes.

    18. Nutrition-education focus. Why does this not happen already?

    19-21. Agreed.

  • HowardB

    As a teacher in Texas I submit that this list ignores the role of athletics in the Public and Private school curriculums. We act like it isn’t part of education but I can tell you from 23 years of experience that both athletics and the accompanying Band dominate and dictate what happens at the high school level in Texas. All academic considerations come a distant third.

  • laabix .

    As a college professor, I can say that this article is based on a FALSE ASSUMPTION that these things are not already in place. Also, telling teachers that they need to “get over themselves” is not a productive way to create collaborative conversation. Too bad the author didn’t spend some time in current schools before writing this, and the authors who alienate teachers with their assumptions and off-putting tone demonstrate prima facie cluelessness that is obsolete.

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  • Inigo Montoya

    Mind/Shift authors need educated on proper presentation and a less “So.. suck-it” attitude.

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  • aaronscc

    Until parents aren’t subsidized to have kids out of wedlock, all the tech in the world won’t make a difference.

    Until some cultures stop harassing their members for doing well in school, this is all dreaming and fodder for the homeschool culture.

    However, the socialist mobs will soon work to make college admission, employment, etc., contingent on a minimum # of years in authorized public school social indoctrination.

  • http://marknoldy.com/ Mark Noldy

    #5) The professional resume is dead, replaced by the personal website. It only stands to reason that testing will be replaced by electronic portfolios.
    #20) Probability and statistics are a far more useful than algebra (although some algebra skills are needed for statistics).

  • kingsxcanada

    I’m going to bookmark this article and have a look in 2020 just to see how incorrect it is. Reminds me of all the fanciful stuff from the 80′s about flying cars and hover boards by now etc. People like to make all kinds of assumptions and predictions about the future, and they’re usually wrong. We’ll see.

  • Brodbart

    Since your list doesn’t include a major increase in school funding, I doubt the potential of most of these things. They sound a bit pricy to me.

  • https://plus.google.com/+RemiZagariRemiZagari/posts Remi Zagari

    Well it sounds like there’s a bright and positive future ahead waiting for us with less structured (and stale) educational facilities. I dont quite get the lockers part, a coat check maybe? uh?

  • dirk

    Has anybody noticed HOW CLOSE WE ARE TO BEING THE WAY IT IS IN WALL-E