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In the Classroom: Young at Art

| July 19, 2012 | 0 Comments
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The yearly Young At Art Festival is a living portfolio for the ongoing work of the San Francisco Unified School District’s Arts Education Master Plan, showcasing work in the visual and performing arts by students K-12. During the week of Young At Art, numerous arts based professional development workshops designed specially for teachers, principals, and Arts Coordinators are presented on site and in direct connection with student work being showcased.

The ongoing dual focus on valuing creative arts partnerships and using San Francisco as the campus inspires the work of the festival, which honors and models both.

In keeping with the inclusion of Creative Writing as a recognized arts discipline, Young At Art features a Literary Arts Awards Ceremony, recognizing student writers and their work; in addition, there is a Media Arts screening to highlight student films presented by the San Francisco Film Society.

Highlights of the week long festival include the evening Community Celebration which features the Dreamcatcher Awards, presented annually to those teachers, administrators and community arts partners who best exemplify the vision and promise of the SFUSD Arts Education Master Plan in action.

KQED has provided ongoing support for innovative new professional development for teachers and Arts Coordinators held in cooperation with arts partners across the city, keeping the promise of the Arts Education Master Plan by using San Francisco as the campus in ways that are powerful and authentic.

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Category: Arts, In the Classroom, Teacher Trainings for Arts

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About the Author ()

Matthew Williams is a filmmaker and media educator who has recently transplanted to Oakland from Los Angeles. He believes that you are what you eat and feels everyone should have a multitude of dietary options for self-realization. Matthew is the Educational Technologist at KQED.