U.S. Supreme Court

RECENT POSTS

Read Transcript of Today’s Oral Arguments in Supreme Court Obamacare Case

Today’s oral arguments in the latest Obamacare case to come before the Supreme Court are now over. Proponents of the law are worried that if the plaintiffs prevail, canceling subsidies to insurance buyers in the federal exchange, the Affordable Care Act could be heading for a death spiral. The Supreme Court website has put up a full transcript of the proceedings, which you can read here. A report on today’s events from Associated Press follows.

Here is AP’s write-up of today’s events:

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court was sharply divided Wednesday in the latest challenge to President Barack Obama’s health overhaul, this time over the tax subsidies that make insurance affordable for millions of Americans.

The justices aggressively questioned lawyers on both sides of what Justice Elena Kagan called “this never-ending saga,” the latest politically charged fight over the Affordable Care Act.

Chief Justice John Roberts said almost nothing in nearly 90 minutes of back-and-forth, and Justice Anthony Kennedy’s questions did not make clear how he will come out. Roberts was the decisive vote to uphold the law in 2012.

Otherwise, the same liberal-conservative divide that characterized the earlier case was evident. Continue reading

Without Individual Mandate, Fewer Californians with Health Insurance

(s_falkow: Flickr)

(s_falkow: Flickr)

In March, the U.S. Supreme Court will consider the constitutionality of several aspects of health care reform, including the “individual mandate,” the requirement that all Americans have health insurance.

In a new study, [PDF] researchers at the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research and UC Berkeley crunched the numbers and determined that without the individual mandate, more than one million Californians would put off buying health insurance.

The individual mandate is part of The Affordable Care Act, set to roll out in 2014. The mandate requires people to purchase health insurance or pay a tax penalty up to $2085 per household. Continue reading