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At Stanford, Using Rodin’s Sculpted Hands to Teach Anatomy

Photo of Auguste Rodin’s “Left Hand of Eustache de St. Pierre” druing the 3D scanning process. (Photo: Matthew Hasel, © Division of Clinical Anatomy, Stanford University School of Medicine)

Photo of Auguste Rodin’s “Left Hand of Eustache de St. Pierre” druing the 3D scanning process. (Photo: Matthew Hasel, © Division of Clinical Anatomy, Stanford University School of Medicine)

By Laura Sydell, NPR

Auguste Rodin is known for his realistic, unflinching depiction of the human form. Some of the French sculptor’s work even shows the ravages of disease and disfigurement. A Stanford University professor and surgeon who noticed these realistic details was inspired to incorporate Rodin into his teaching using a curriculum that combines Rodin’s sculpture with medical science and computer technology.

Superimposing scans of patients’ hands into Rodin’s hands to show 3-D anatomy.

Dr. James Chang first noticed certain details of Rodin’s sculptures when he was a medical resident at Stanford studying hand surgery. He used to relax on the grass at the sculpture garden of the school’s Cantor Arts Center. “The more I looked at the Rodin sculptures … and I focused on the hands, and if you look at each hand … they’re exactly like the actual medical conditions I was treating.”

The works include some of Rodin’s most famous pieces, like the Burghers of Calais, a group of defeated noblemen. Chang noticed that one of the Burghers had fused fingers. “We have children with Apert syndrome that have a similar fusion of the fingers and an open thumb, and we release the fingers to put [them] into a more natural condition,” he says. Continue reading

Sex Information, Teens and Technology: YTHLive in San Francisco

A powerful way to reach teens with credible health information say conference organizers. (okalkavan/Flickr)

A powerful way to reach underserved teens with credible health information say conference organizers. (okalkavan/Flickr)

In the olden days, teens and young adults who wanted accurate information about contraception or sexually transmitted diseases would perhaps find a trusted adult or sneak a book or perhaps rely on information (misinformation?) from peers.

Not so much any more. Mobile apps and websites provide a range of options, and YTH.org (that’s for youth, tech, health) is the focal point.

Its mission: To advance youth health and wellness through technology.

YTH Live kicked off Sunday in San Francisco and runs through tomorrow. The conference convenes everyone from public health professionals to youth advocates to social entrepreneurs. KQED’s Stephanie Martin talked with YTH.org executive director Deb Levine about the conference.

Here’s their conversation, lightly edited: Continue reading