Stress

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Work as Refuge? Working Mothers Report Better Health

Life at the office can look really appealing sometimes. (Getty Images)

Life at the office can look really appealing sometimes. (Getty Images)

I love it when my job intersects with the rest of my life.

NPR is reporting Tuesday about a fascinating survey that found that women who work full time “reported significantly better physical and mental health than moms who part time.” They heard from more than 2,500 mothers in the 2012 survey.

In addition, people appear to be more stressed at home than they are at work.

Oh, and mothers who worked part time said they enjoyed better health than their counterparts who didn’t work at all.

Really? As the mother of two children who worked part time for several years before taking this job, I was all-in on this story. Could I really be enjoying peak health while working full time and — yes — still raising those kids. (Disclosure that my husband does help: Thanks, dear!) Continue reading

Like Other Animals, We Need Stress — in Moderation

A stress system gone awry can quite literally make people sick. (Getty Images)

A stress system gone awry can quite literally make people sick. (Getty Images)

By Richard Harris, NPR

Ask somebody about stress, and you’re likely to hear an outpouring about all the bad things that cause it — and the bad things that result. But if you ask a biologist, you’ll hear that stress can be good.

In fact, it’s essential.

But people who responded to NPR’s poll talked mostly about the downside of stress.

For example, the adrenal glands of all animals have evolved to pump out stress hormones in unexpected situations — the hormones spur action and increase fuel to the brain, helping the animal react to danger appropriately. Those hormones also flow to memory centers in the brain, to help the critter remember those notable moments and places.

“If it turns out to be dangerous and if the animal actually turns out to survive danger, then it will be aware of this as a potentially dangerous place,” explains Bruce McEwen, head of the neuroendocrinology laboratory at The Rockefeller University. “In that sense, stress is good.” Continue reading