Safety Net Providers

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Code Black: Young Doctors Still in Love with Medicine

Dr. Jamie Eng with patient in the documentary "Code Black."

Dr. Jamie Eng with patient in the documentary “Code Black.”

Don’t eat a sandwich before you sit down to watch the documentary “Code Black.” In one of the first scenes, we watch a team of doctors and nurses cut into a patient. It’s a bloody business, and the camera doesn’t turn away. That’s because this film is about the brilliant chaos of emergency care, and the people drawn to this work.

For all the debate over health care in America, it’s relatively rare to hear from doctors on the front lines, and even more rare to hear from young doctors about a field they’ve recently chosen to devote their lives to. “Code Black,” a documentary by a doctor when he was a resident at LA County’s USC Medical Center, delivers that perspective with punch and passion. It promises a look into “America’s busiest ER.” Continue reading

Obamacare Means New Challenges for California’s Safety Net Providers

Natividad Medical Center is a public hospital in Salinas. It's part of the system of safety net institutions that serve Californians with nowhere else to go. Even as health reform is implemented, millions of Californians will remain uninsured. (Lisa Morehouse/KQED)

Natividad Medical Center is a public hospital in Salinas. It’s part of the system of safety net institutions that serve Californians with nowhere else to go. Even as health reform is implemented, millions of Californians will remain uninsured. (Lisa Morehouse/KQED)

By Lisa Morehouse

California leads the nation in the number of people getting insurance through the Affordable Care Act. But now that the final deadline has come and gone on Tuesday, millions are still left uninsured. These people will still turn to community clinics and public hospitals for care — they are the safety net institutions that serve Californians with nowhere else to go. But as the ACA is implemented, those institutions are facing changes.

One such place is Centro Medico. It’s tucked away in a corner of a shopping center in Cathedral City, a predominantly Latino bedroom community sandwiched between the resort towns of Palm Springs and Rancho Mirage. Here is where many hospitality workers who serve the neighboring resorts live.

Centro Medico’s manager, Daisy Morfin, sees a lot of pent-up need for medical care. Since enrollment in the Affordable Care Act started last fall, she says the clinic is getting up to 10 new patients a day.

Many are people who have qualified for health insurance for the first time in years — or ever. Continue reading