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Sharon Wilson, 53, picks up her weekly allotment of produce from the AIDS Project of the East Bay. Wilson, who has HIV, says without help, she couldn't afford to buy fresh vegetables. (Angela Hart/KQED)

Sharon Wilson, 53, picks up her weekly allotment of produce from the AIDS Project of the East Bay. Wilson, who has HIV, says without help, she couldn’t afford to buy fresh vegetables. (Angela Hart/KQED)

By Angela Hart

Several times each week, Sharon Wilson, a 53-year-old HIV-positive retired caregiver, takes an hour-long bus ride from her Berkeley home to her clinic in downtown Oakland. Wilson doesn’t mind making the trip, because she says the care she has received there since her diagnosis has saved her life.

Wilson says multiple chronic diseases, including HIV, have made it impossible for her to work. Ensuing financial struggles make managing her disease increasingly difficult.

“I can’t afford healthy food and all the medications I need to take,” Wilson said as she described her strict antiretroviral drug regimen. “It’s not easy to learn a new way of living. I take a handful of pills when I wake up in the morning, a handful of pills with lunch, and another handful before I go to bed.”

For people like Wilson, the AIDS Project of the East Bay — one of Alameda County’s six HIV specialty clinics — is a place of refuge. There, Wilson has received primary care for her HIV and specialty care since 2006. She’s been referred to Oakland’s Highland Hospital multiple times to treat other chronic conditions, including congestive heart failure and arthritis. Continue reading