Policy

Actions by people in power – lawmakers, regulators and the like – can make a difference to your health, for better or for worse. We keep you informed

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Is It Time to Reform California’s Sex Offender Registry?

(Scott Pacaldo/Flickr)

California is one of just four states that requires sex offenders to register for the rest of their lives. (Scott Pacaldo/Flickr)

By Tara Siler

Back in 1947 California became the first state to require sex offenders to register with law enforcement after being released from prison. Now there are just under 100,000 sex offenders on the state’s lifetime registry — most of whom can be found on the state’s public website. But here’s what a lot of people don’t know: California is one of just four states requiring all sex offenders to register for the rest of their lives.

‘The reality is that for most of them the offense happened years ago.’
The state board that oversees the registry believes it’s time to overhaul the registry to make it smaller and easier to spot those at high risk of reoffending.

“K” — as he wants to be identified — is a case in point. He was added to the registry last year when he was released from prison. In 2009, he was convicted of multiple felony charges, including lewd and lascivious conduct.

While K claims the touching was consensual, the woman said it wasn’t. In any case, the woman was developmentally disabled and K was her caregiver. Continue reading

Code Black: Young Doctors Still in Love with Medicine

Dr. Jamie Eng with patient in the documentary "Code Black."

Dr. Jamie Eng with patient in the documentary “Code Black.”

Don’t eat a sandwich before you sit down to watch the documentary “Code Black.” In one of the first scenes, we watch a team of doctors and nurses cut into a patient. It’s a bloody business, and the camera doesn’t turn away. That’s because this film is about the brilliant chaos of emergency care, and the people drawn to this work.

For all the debate over health care in America, it’s relatively rare to hear from doctors on the front lines, and even more rare to hear from young doctors about a field they’ve recently chosen to devote their lives to. “Code Black,” a documentary by a doctor when he was a resident at LA County’s USC Medical Center, delivers that perspective with punch and passion. It promises a look into “America’s busiest ER.” Continue reading

Nearly a Million People Backlogged in Medi-Cal Expansion

It's not clear when the backlog will be cleared. (Getty Images)

It’s not clear when the backlog will be cleared. (Getty Images)

By Helen Shen, Kaiser Health News

A massive backlog of Medi-Cal applications is well into its third month, and California officials have provided little information about how and when the largest such bottleneck in the nation might be cleared.

The California Department of Health Care Services in Sacramento first reported 800,000 pending applications in April. By May, that number had grown by 100,000 and has not budged much since. As the state works through older applications, new ones continue each day to enter the system, which has been plagued by computer glitches and inefficient procedures for verifying applicants’ personal information.

There are no estimates of processing times or how long delays will persist, though a state official said last month that new applications in May appeared to have slowed. Continue reading

Advocates Urge Repeal of ‘Maximum Family Grant’

(Craig Miller/KQED)

(Craig Miller/KQED)

If you looked at that headline and thought, “What is the maximum family grant?” you’re probably not alone.

‘We’re choosing to have a policy which penalizes the poor child and the woman who is poor.’

Twenty years ago this week, in the midst of the Clinton-era welfare reforms, California became one of 16 states to pass a limit on assistance to new children born into families that had been receiving welfare benefits in the 10 months before the child was born. In California, the welfare program is called CalWORKs.

The idea was to prevent people receiving aid from having more children. Continue reading

Opposing Sides Testify Before State Committee over Insurance Proposition

Peter Lee, seen here in a 2012 photo, is the executive director of Covered California and testified Thursday before the joint legislative committee on health.

Peter Lee, seen here in a 2012 photo, is the executive director of Covered California and testified Thursday before the joint legislative committee on health.

State insurance commissioner Dave Jones is flatly rejecting accusations that a proposition on November’s ballot would undermine the implementation of the Affordable Care Act in California.

If passed by voters, Proposition 45 would give the commissioner the power to reject excessive rate hikes for health insurance –- and, he argues, keep health premiums affordable for consumers. Last month, Covered California, the state’s health insurance exchange, said the measure could compromise its operations, possibly causing delays in approving health plans before they are federally mandated to go on sale to consumers, or curtailing its own authority to negotiate the details of plans with insurers.

“These conclusions are fundamentally flawed,” Jones said on Wednesday, speaking before the state’s joint legislative committee on health. Continue reading

Berkeley City Council Puts Soda Tax on November Ballot

(Getty Images)

(Getty Images)

By Charles Siler, Berkeleyside

Berkeley City Council voted unanimously Tuesday night to include a proposal that would tax distributors of sugar-sweetened beverages on the November ballot.

Voters will decide on penny-per-ounce tax on soda and other sugar-sweetened beverages.
The measure, which proposes a one-cent-per-ounce charge at the distributor level, would be the first such tax passed in the country. Richmond tried to pass a similar tax in 2012, but it was voted down after a $2.7 million campaign by the soda industry.

Supporters of the tax point to studies linking sugary drinks to childhood obesity and diabetes. Members of community organization Berkeley vs. Big Soda gathered on the steps of city hall before the Tuesday night meeting to voice their support of the tax. Continue reading

Hobby Lobby Decision Has Limited Impact in California

 Anti-abortion advocates rally in front of the Supreme Court awaiting the decision in Burwell v. Hobby Lobby Stores was announced Monday. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Anti-abortion advocates rally in front of the Supreme Court awaiting the decision in Burwell v. Hobby Lobby Stores was announced Monday. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Most women in California won’t be affected by Monday’s U.S. Supreme Court landmark decision in Sebelius v. Hobby Lobby. The Christian owners of the craft store chain challenged the Affordable Care Act’s requirement that companies provide contraception coverage to their employees. The Court ruled that closely-held, for-profit companies can opt out if they object on religious grounds.

But it’s not so easy in California. That’s because the ruling doesn’t apply to state laws. California has had the Women’s Contraceptive Equity Act on the books since 1999. It requires health insurance companies that cover prescription drugs to also cover birth control.

“For most workers in California, nothing will change,” says Maggie Crosby, attorney with the ACLU of Northern California. “Women should feel secure that if they have birth control coverage today, they will have it tomorrow.”

She says the state law is still in full effect after Monday’s Supreme Court ruling. Continue reading

Hobby Lobby decision has limited impact on California

Most women in California won’t be affected by Monday’s U.S. Supreme Court landmark decision in Sebelius v. Hobby Lobby. The Christian owners of the craft store chain challenged the Affordable Care Act’s requirement that companies provide contraception coverage to their employees. The Court ruled that closely-held, for-profit companies can opt out if they object on religious grounds.

But it’s not so easy in California. That’s because the ruling doesn’t apply to state laws. And California has had the Women’s Contraceptive Equity Act on the books since 1999. It requires health insurance companies that cover prescription drugs to also cover birth control.

“For most workers in California, nothing will change,” says Maggie Crosby, attorney with the ACLU of Northern California. “Women should feel secure that if they have birth control coverage today, they will have it tomorrow.” Continue reading

Initial Mammogram Cost Comparisons in KQED’s PriceCheck Project

(Illustration: Andy Warner)

(Illustration: Andy Warner)

Last Monday, KQED, KPCC and ClearHealthCosts.com launched our community-created guide to health costs.

Share what you paid for a mammogram. Visit KQED’s PriceCheck.
As I outlined last week, health care costs lack transparency, and it’s virtually impossible for consumers to shop around. We’re asking you, members of our KQED community, to share what you’ve paid for common health care procedures. Your responses feed directly into a database so others can look up how much mammograms cost in their area.

So far, we’ve received a handful of submitted prices. Our partner, ClearHealthCosts, had previously collected a range of “self-pay” prices — that’s the price people are charged if they do not have insurance or have decided to go out of their insurance network and are paying out of their own pocket. Continue reading

Coordinated Care for Those Nearing Life’s End — But Does It Save Money?

Sutter nurse Aileen Capuyan listens to Bob Martinez’s lungs. (April Dembosky/KQED)

Sutter nurse Aileen Capuyan listens to Bob Martinez’s lungs. (April Dembosky/KQED)

Bob Martinez has been in the hospital so many times, the surgical staff treats him like a regular at a coffee shop.

“They all know me!” he says. “If I go in there today, they’d say, ‘How’re ya doing Mr. Martinez?’ ”

‘I’m so sick and tired of being in hospitals. I don’t want to go back no more. I said, God, no more.’

Martinez is 81, a long-retired life insurance salesman. In the last few years, he’s had more than a dozen surgeries on his right leg, including a foot amputation, a casualty of severe diabetes. His heart disease has warranted almost half a dozen heart procedures. After one of his recent operations, he said he’d had enough.

“I’m so sick and tired of being in hospitals,” he says shaking his head. “I don’t want to go back no more. I said, God, no more. No more.”

That’s when hospital staff told him about a program through Sutter Health that would send people to take care of him at home. It’s called the Advanced Illness Management program, or AIM. It’s designed for people like Martinez who have multiple chronic illnesses. Continue reading