Community Health

From rural California to urban neighborhoods, where you live affects your health

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Options Outlined in Doctors Medical Center Court Hearing

(s_falkow: Flickr)

(s_falkow: Flickr)

(Bay City News) A federal judge in San Francisco today heard arguments Wednesday for — and against — court intervention that would force financially embattled Doctors Medical Center in San Pablo to restore recently cut emergency services.

The U.S. District Court hearing came amid an ongoing fight to keep the hospital open. Officials have reduced services and shed more than 80 staff members there after multiple failed attempts to cover the hospital’s $18 million deficit.

Earlier this month, the hospital stopped accepting emergency ambulances, closed its heart attack intervention unit and reduced its number of inpatient beds to 50. Emergency ambulances that would normally go to DMC are now re-routed to other area hospitals.

A group of doctors, nurses and community advocates filed a lawsuit in federal court on Aug. 12 against Contra Costa County, each member of the Board of Supervisors and West Contra Costa County Healthcare District and district board chairman Eric Zell. Continue reading

For Some, Medi-Cal Might Mean Ultimately Losing Their Homes

Anne-Louise Vernon in front of her home in Campbell. (Photo: Pauline Bartolone)

Anne-Louise Vernon in front of her home in Campbell. She recently enrolled in Medi-Cal then found out the state could use proceeds from her home to recover costs of her health care. (Photo: Pauline Bartolone)

By Pauline Bartolone, Kaiser Health News

Anne-Louise Vernon had been looking forward to signing up for health insurance under Covered California. She was hoping to save hundreds of dollars a month. But when she called to enroll, she was told her income wasn’t high enough to purchase a subsidized plan.

“It never even occurred to me I might be on Medi-Cal,” she said, in reference to the state’s version of Medicaid, “and I didn’t know anything about it.”

She says she asked whether there were any strings attached.

“And the woman said very cheerfully, “Oh no, no, it’s all free. There’s nothing you have to worry about, this is your lucky day.’” she recounts.

Vernon signed up for Medi-Cal on the phone from her home in Campbell. But months later, she learned online about a state law that allows California to take assets of people who die if they received health care through Medi-Cal after the age of 55. Continue reading

Sacramento Patient Being Tested for Possible Exposure to Ebola

Ebola virus magnified 108,000 times. (Getty Images)

Ebola virus magnified 108,000 times. (Getty Images)

By Lisa Aliferis and April Dembosky

Don’t panic, folks. Really.

A patient who may have been exposed to the Ebola virus is being tested at Kaiser’s South Sacramento Hospital.

The other key information here is that California Department of Public Health officials call the unidentified patient “low risk,” according to criteria established by the CDC that considers travel history, exposure to infection, and clinical features.

In a call with reporters Wednesday afternoon, CDPH deputy Dr. Gil Chavez said the state has received no reports of any high risk patients. CDPH said the patient is being tested out of an “abundance of caution.”

In a statement, Dr. Stephen Parodi, director of hospital operations for Kaiser Northern California, said the unidentified patient is being kept in a specially equipped negative pressure room, and staff working with the patient are using “personal protective equipment.” Continue reading

Fresno Considers Ending Health Services for the Undocumented

Fresno residents demonstrate their support for a county health program that covers care for undocumented immigrants (Courtesy: Fresno Building Healthy Communities)

Fresno residents demonstrate their support for a county health program that covers care for undocumented immigrants (Courtesy: Fresno Building Healthy Communities)

Update: Fresno County’s Board of Supervisors voted 4-1 to end the contract providing care to the poor and to undocumented immigrants. 

Original Post:

Brandon Hauk’s job is about to get a lot harder. The health of about 7,000 patients he helps at Clinica Sierra Vista in Fresno is in the hands of the county board of supervisors – they are set to vote Tuesday whether or not to shut down a program that covers specialty care for the undocumented.

Hauk doesn’t want to think about how he’s going to explain that to people when their primary care doctor says they need to see a cardiologist, pulmonologist, or endocrinologist.

“What do you say to somebody that has chronic illness and we can’t refer them out? Sorry?” says Hauk. “I mean, how can you tell someone that has abdominal bleeds, I’m sorry, but we can’t help you.”

Fresno’s Medically Indigent Services Program was set up decades ago to provide health coverage for the poor, and later, the undocumented. But now that the Affordable Care Act has gone into effect, the county says it doesn’t need the program anymore. Now tens of thousands of uninsured Fresnans have health coverage through Obamacare. More than that, the county says it can’t afford to keep the program going. Continue reading

The Assisted Living Reform Bills That Died

By Polly Stryker

Taking some fresh air in the courtyard at Westchester Villa, an assisted facility in Inglewood. (Rachael Myrow/KQED)

Taking some fresh air in the courtyard at Westchester Villa, an assisted facility in Inglewood. (Rachael Myrow/KQED)

Last Thursday, August 14, was the day that bills still in the state Senate Appropriations Committee sank or swam. The Senate Appropriations Committee is where bills costing $150,000 or more go for consideration. If bills make it out of this committee, then bills are still in play and could make it to the governor’s desk, albeit with potential amendments along the way. If not, they die.

Going into the home stretch of this legislative session, 16 bills were on the table that, altogether, constituted the first major overhaul of the assisted living industry in nearly 30 years.

Two have already made it to the governor’s desk. AB1523 mandates liability insurance for all assisted living facilities. Advocates say liability insurance is one of the best ways to improve conditions in the industry. Operators whose violations make buying insurance too expensive will be simply forced out of business. The industry group California Assisted Living Association supported AB1523. AB1572 mandates facility operators allow and support resident and family councils at assisted living facilities. CALA supported that one as well.

Most of the rest of the bills are still swimming. But what about the bills that died?

Continue reading

Old Muni Buses Are Reborn as Mobile Showers for the Homeless

Doniece Sandoval is the founder of Lava Mae, a mobile shower service for homeless people.

Doniece Sandoval is the founder of Lava Mae, a mobile shower service for homeless people. (Lynne Shallcross/KQED)

By Lynne Shallcross

Showering is a daily routine that most of us probably take for granted. But for people living on the streets or in shelters in San Francisco, finding a shower can be one of the biggest daily challenges.

‘Then no one has to know you’re homeless unless you tell them.’

For the more than 3,000 unsheltered homeless people in San Francisco, there are only roughly 20 showers available — fewer if any are out of service. Then there are the logistics of sign-up lists, limited hours, waiting lines and figuring out how to get there.

Doniece Sandoval, a marketing and communications professional and South Texas native, had seen plenty of shower-less homeless in her two decades in San Francisco. But when she passed a young homeless woman on the street who was crying that she’d never be clean, Sandoval decided to do something about it.

So she hatched the idea for Lava Mae, a new service that provides showers in a retrofitted, retired Muni bus. Lava Mae, a play on the Spanish word for “wash me,” is in the pilot phase of its service. Continue reading

Lawsuit Claims Service Reductions at San Pablo Hospital Violate Civil Rights Act

Photo: Doctor's Medical Center

Photo: Doctors Medical Center

by Alexandra Garreton, Jon Brooks, and Bay City News

Contra Costa County officials say they’re doing their best to keep the largest hospital in west Contra Costa County from going under. And that means cutting patient services.

This month Doctors Medical Center in San Pablo stopped accepting ambulances and reduced the number of in-patient beds to 50. County Health Services officials said last week that the 22 to 24 emergency ambulance patients normally seen at DMC each day — including three to four considered to be in critical condition — are now being diverted to other area hospitals.

Last fall, Doctor’s Medical Center announced a fiscal emergency and planned closure of the hospital. In recent months, at least 88 doctors, nurses and other hospital staffers have left, according to DMC spokesman Chuck Finney.

The hospital plans to cut more beds and close their cardiac unit in September.

Continue reading

Are The Proposed Assisted Living Reforms in California Enough?

CAPTION COMING (Rachael Myrow/KQED)

A “crime book” maintained by the San Diego advocacy group Consumer Advocates for RCFE Reform. (RCFE is short for Residential Care Facility for the Elderly.) This book contains cases of what CARR calls “egregious neglect” at San Diego assisted living facilities. (Rachael Myrow/KQED)

Over the last 25 years, the number of assisted living facilities in California has nearly doubled. The homes are intended to care for relatively independent, healthy seniors, but that doesn’t describe a lot of the people living in them today.

“There’s been a seismic shift in the population they serve,” says Deborah Schoch of the California HealthCare Foundation Center for Health Reporting. Schoch says the system was set up to meet the needs of people who could use some extra help with the tasks of daily living –- and it does. But many of those people need a lot of help.

The system, she says, is caring for people “who are frail, who may have dementia, who may be wheelchair bound, who may not be able to turn on their own in bed.”

Continue reading

Crime in Assisted Living: What Happens After

Stacy Siriani's father suffered a serious injury while in an assisted living facility in San Diego. (Rachael Myrow/KQED)

Stacy Siriani’s father suffered a serious injury while in an assisted living facility in San Diego. (Rachael Myrow/KQED)

When families place a loved one in an assisted living facility, there’s an expectation that if something goes wrong, there will be consequences. Mistakes will be addressed. If crimes are committed, they will be prosecuted. Or at least investigated by law enforcement.

But that’s not always what happens.

Take the case of Stacey Siriani of San Diego County. Her experience with assisted living began four years ago when she got an awful phone call from Houston. Her father was involved in an auto accident that left him brain damaged.

“It was very tough,” she recalls. Siriani is an only child; her father is a widower. There was nowhere else to turn for support.

Continue reading

Unions Fight Sale of Safety-Net Hospitals

Six safety-net hospitals owned by the Daughters of Charity Health System — four in the Bay Area and two in Los Angeles — are for sale. The company says it’s out of money and needs another organization to take over.

The mission of Daughters of Charity hospitals is to take care of the poor and needy. CEO Robert Issai says that three-quarters of the patients are covered by government health programs, which pay significantly less than private insurers.

“We’ve always had that 25 percent of commercial business to make ends meet,” he said.

But a lot of that dried up when the recession hit in 2008. People lost their jobs and their insurance. Then the government cut back too, slashing reimbursement rates. Continue reading