Monthly Archives: June 2014

New Guidelines Say Many Women Can Skip Pelvic Exam

(Maigh/Flickr)

If this picture makes you shudder, you’ll want to understand the new guideline. (Maigh/Flickr)

No more dreaded pelvic exam? New guidelines say most healthy women can skip the yearly ritual.

Routine pelvic exams don’t benefit women who have no symptoms of disease and who aren’t pregnant, and they can cause harm, the American College of Physicians said Monday as it recommended that doctors quit using them as a screening tool.

It’s part of a growing movement to evaluate whether many longtime medical practices are done more out of habit than necessity, and the guideline is sure to be controversial.

Scientific evidence “just doesn’t support the benefit of having a pelvic exam every year,” said guideline coauthor Dr. Linda Humphrey of the Portland Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Oregon Health & Science University. Continue reading

Initial Mammogram Cost Comparisons in KQED’s PriceCheck Project

(Illustration: Andy Warner)

(Illustration: Andy Warner)

Last Monday, KQED, KPCC and ClearHealthCosts.com launched our community-created guide to health costs.

Share what you paid for a mammogram. Visit KQED’s PriceCheck.
As I outlined last week, health care costs lack transparency, and it’s virtually impossible for consumers to shop around. We’re asking you, members of our KQED community, to share what you’ve paid for common health care procedures. Your responses feed directly into a database so others can look up how much mammograms cost in their area.

So far, we’ve received a handful of submitted prices. Our partner, ClearHealthCosts, had previously collected a range of “self-pay” prices — that’s the price people are charged if they do not have insurance or have decided to go out of their insurance network and are paying out of their own pocket. Continue reading

Surprising Advantage for Older Moms: More Likely to Live Longer

(Getty Images)

(Getty Images)

As a woman who had not just her last child, but also her first child after age 33, I enthusiastically clicked on the NPR story in my Facebook feed this morning.

NPR reports that older moms — women who had their last child after age 33 — have twice the odds of “exceptional longevity” as women who had their last child before age 29. This “exceptional longevity” is defined as living to age 95. The research is according to a study published this week in the journal Menopause.

I got over the fact that “older moms” are women who had their last child after 33, which seems kind of young to me.

NPR explains why there may be a connection between bearing children later and longevity: Continue reading

Whooping Cough Epidemic Continues — 1,100 New Cases in Last Two Weeks

A vial containing the acellular pertussis vaccine. (Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images)

A vial containing the acellular pertussis vaccine (Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images)

In the two weeks since California health officials declared a whooping cough epidemic, the state has added 1,100 more cases, officials with the California Department of Public Health said Friday.

That brings the total number of cases to 4,558. A third infant died of the disease recently. The baby, from Sacramento County, had started showing symptoms at just 3 weeks of age. The baby was hospitalized for more than a year and then passed away.

Infants are at particular risk because they cannot be vaccinated until they are several weeks old. Generally, the recommendation is that babies receive the first dose of vaccine at 8 weeks, but in light of the epidemic, state health officials say babies can be vaccinated at 6 weeks.

Continue reading

Covered California Needs Better Outreach to Limited-English Speakers, Advocates Say

A report from Berkeley's Greenlining Institute called on Covered California to make its enrollment website available in more languages than English and Spanish.

A report from Berkeley’s Greenlining Institute called on Covered California to make its enrollment website available in more languages than English and Spanish.

Covered California may have had strong overall enrollment, but people who do not speak English as a first language are underrepresented in the state’s health insurance marketplace, according to an analysis from Berkeley’s Greenlining Institute.

The report relied on Covered California data, which showed that 20 percent of enrollees do not speak English as a primary language. That’s compared with 44 percent of Californians overall.

“We know California is a diverse state ethnically and linguistically,” said Jordan Medina, a health policy fellow with Greenlining and lead author of the study. “Moving forward, if the Affordable Care Act is going to work in California, we have to make sure those populations are represented in the health insurance marketplace.” Continue reading

Coordinated Care for Those Nearing Life’s End — But Does It Save Money?

Sutter nurse Aileen Capuyan listens to Bob Martinez’s lungs. (April Dembosky/KQED)

Sutter nurse Aileen Capuyan listens to Bob Martinez’s lungs. (April Dembosky/KQED)

Bob Martinez has been in the hospital so many times, the surgical staff treats him like a regular at a coffee shop.

“They all know me!” he says. “If I go in there today, they’d say, ‘How’re ya doing Mr. Martinez?’ ”

‘I’m so sick and tired of being in hospitals. I don’t want to go back no more. I said, God, no more.’

Martinez is 81, a long-retired life insurance salesman. In the last few years, he’s had more than a dozen surgeries on his right leg, including a foot amputation, a casualty of severe diabetes. His heart disease has warranted almost half a dozen heart procedures. After one of his recent operations, he said he’d had enough.

“I’m so sick and tired of being in hospitals,” he says shaking his head. “I don’t want to go back no more. I said, God, no more. No more.”

That’s when hospital staff told him about a program through Sutter Health that would send people to take care of him at home. It’s called the Advanced Illness Management program, or AIM. It’s designed for people like Martinez who have multiple chronic illnesses. Continue reading

At Stanford, Using Rodin’s Sculpted Hands to Teach Anatomy

Photo of Auguste Rodin’s “Left Hand of Eustache de St. Pierre” druing the 3D scanning process. (Photo: Matthew Hasel, © Division of Clinical Anatomy, Stanford University School of Medicine)

Photo of Auguste Rodin’s “Left Hand of Eustache de St. Pierre” druing the 3D scanning process. (Photo: Matthew Hasel, © Division of Clinical Anatomy, Stanford University School of Medicine)

By Laura Sydell, NPR

Auguste Rodin is known for his realistic, unflinching depiction of the human form. Some of the French sculptor’s work even shows the ravages of disease and disfigurement. A Stanford University professor and surgeon who noticed these realistic details was inspired to incorporate Rodin into his teaching using a curriculum that combines Rodin’s sculpture with medical science and computer technology.

Superimposing scans of patients’ hands into Rodin’s hands to show 3-D anatomy.

Dr. James Chang first noticed certain details of Rodin’s sculptures when he was a medical resident at Stanford studying hand surgery. He used to relax on the grass at the sculpture garden of the school’s Cantor Arts Center. “The more I looked at the Rodin sculptures … and I focused on the hands, and if you look at each hand … they’re exactly like the actual medical conditions I was treating.”

The works include some of Rodin’s most famous pieces, like the Burghers of Calais, a group of defeated noblemen. Chang noticed that one of the Burghers had fused fingers. “We have children with Apert syndrome that have a similar fusion of the fingers and an open thumb, and we release the fingers to put [them] into a more natural condition,” he says. Continue reading

Clues to Dementia Often Missed in Vulnerable Older Adults

IMG_0224

Dr. Anna Chodos, a UCSF geriatrician, has worked with many seniors who lived in dangerous situations due to lack of awareness and early screening for dementia. (Ryder Diaz/KQED)

Editor’s Note: As Californians live longer, the number of dementia, a disease that destroys not only memory but also critical-thinking skills will grow. As part of our ongoing series on health, called Vital Signs, we hear from Anna Chodos, a physician specializing in geriatrics. She says that social services can often keep people with dementia safe in their homes, but many older adults aren’t getting the diagnosis they need. 

By Anna Chodos

To diagnosis [dementia] early is to give people a chance to be a part of planning for the future in a very meaningful way. And that’s exactly what I’m not seeing. I’m seeing people stuck in situations where they now don’t have the ability to engage with you in complicated decision making and they’re not making safe decisions for themselves.

Dementia can affect your ability to remember to pay bills. It affects your ability to comply with your medical plan. Continue reading

Study Finds Pesticide Exposure in Pregnancy Linked to Autism

(tpmartins/Flickr)

(tpmartins/Flickr)

Pregnant women living within a mile of fields where pesticides were applied faced almost double the risk of having a baby who developed autism — compared to women who lived more than a mile away, a new study finds.

U.C. Davis researchers tracked pesticide applications on farms in the Central Valley, near Sacramento, and the Bay Area and matched that data to the addresses of women who lived nearby when they were pregnant.

The fetus tends to be vulnerable to certain kinds of insults,” said Irva Hertz-Picciotto, an environmental epidemiologist at the MIND Institute at U.C. Davis and lead author of the study. “Pesticides may be one of those sets of chemicals that we need to be particularly careful about.

The study was published Monday in Environmental Health Perspectives. Continue reading

KQED Launches ‘PriceCheck’ to Make Health Costs Transparent

(Photo: Getty Images)

(Photo: Getty Images)

Update June 30: Early PriceCheck data show Bay Area mammogram prices range from $125 to $801

Original Post:

Say you’re shopping for a new computer or a new car, and you want to get the best price. Within a matter of minutes on Google, you would have a pretty good idea of the price range for the product you want.

But in health care? Forget it.

Shining light on a system where the costs of the same procedure might range from $0 to $1,100. That’s just one example.

It’s well known to health policy types, but less so to consumers, that health care prices are utterly lacking in transparency and wildly variable.

If you’ve ever looked at a bill for a health care procedure — and been astounded by the numbers you see — or thought that you would like to find the best price on an elective procedure — and been astounded that there’s no easy way to compare prices — KQED is launching a new project for you.

Today we bring you “Price Check,” a community-created guide to health costs. Since no database yet exists where consumers can easily look up costs, we’re commencing the work of creating one. But we need your help.

This summer and into the fall, we’re turning to you, our community, to share — anonymously — what you have paid for some common procedures. We’re starting with mammograms. (More on “why mammograms?” in a moment.) Continue reading