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Two Common Pathogens Can Survive for Days on Surfaces in Airplanes

KQED Science | June 4, 2014 | 0 Comments

Two Common Pathogens Can Survive for Days on Surfaces in Airplanes

Disease-causing pathogens, like MRSA and E. coli bacteria, can linger for days on surfaces in airplane cabins, according to new research results from Auburn University.

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Famous Sunset Paintings Reflect Key Air Pollution Events From the Past

KQED Science | June 3, 2014 | 0 Comments

Famous Sunset Paintings Reflect Key Air Pollution Events From the Past

Data about volcanic eruptions and industrial pollution are encoded in great works of art.

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<a href=http://blogs.kqed.org/lowdown/2014/05/20/making-sense-of-san-franciscos-bone-chilling-summertime-fog/ target=_blank >The Chilling Effect: Why San Francisco Gets So Foggy in the Summer</a>

The Lowdown | May 20, 2014

The Chilling Effect: Why San Francisco Gets So Foggy in the Summer

To start, a beautiful time-lapse film by Simon Christen … “The coldest winter I ever spent was a summer in San Francisco.” Mark Twain may never have actually said it himself, but that doesn't make the observation any less accurate. As any naive tourist shivering miserably in a tank ...Read More

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California Wildfires: Training for a Tough Season

KQED Science | May 19, 2014 | 0 Comments

California Wildfires: Training for a Tough Season

Seasonal firefighters started training months earlier than usual this year. It may seem like common sense that it's dry out there, but there is a science to knowing how dry, and to knowing when the threat of wildfire is at its worst.

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<a href=http://www.californiareport.org/archive/R201405161630/e target=_blank >Los Angeles Studies Its Tiniest Residents: Insects</a>

The California Report | May 16, 2014

Los Angeles Studies Its Tiniest Residents: Insects

If you think about the kinds of bugs you'd find in a city, you might imagine ants, cockroaches, bees -- maybe mosquitoes or even bed bugs. But that doesn't even begin to scratch the surface. In fact there are probably millions of different insects out there. And now a large ...Read More

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Progress in Earthquake Forecasts May Come from Studying Foreshocks

KQED Science | May 15, 2014 | 0 Comments

Progress in Earthquake Forecasts May Come from Studying Foreshocks

Recent cutting-edge techniques are opening a new approach for earthquake forecasts by matching foreshocks -- small quakes occurring on the same stretch of fault that subsequently fails in the large mainshock -- to changes on the seafloor.

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Drought Tech: How Solar Desalination Could Help Parched Farms

KQED Science | May 9, 2014 | 4 Comments

Drought Tech: How Solar Desalination Could Help Parched Farms

While coastal communities debate the merits of desalting seawater as a drought solution, a new approach to desalination could be a boon to farmers far inland.

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Judge Orders Silicon Valley Billionaire to Testify in Dispute Over Beach

KQED Science | May 8, 2014 | 3 Comments

Judge Orders Silicon Valley Billionaire to Testify in Dispute Over Beach

Venture capitalist expected to appear Monday in case involving access to a popular local beach.

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<a href=http://blogs.kqed.org/newsfix/commercial-salmon-fishing-season-opens-in-california target=_blank >The Return of the Kings: Salmon Season Opens in California</a>

News Fix | May 7, 2014

The Return of the Kings: Salmon Season Opens in California

Commercial salmon boats arrive with their first catch of 2014, which promises to be a productive season. ...Read More

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First Sick California Condor Arrives at Oakland Zoo Hospital

KQED Science | May 6, 2014 | 0 Comments

First Sick California Condor Arrives at Oakland Zoo Hospital

A California condor is receiving treatment at the Oakland Zoo for lead poisoning. She's the zoo's first condor patient at their animal hospital.

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Citing Budget Concerns, NASA Defends Long-Term Plan To Reach Mars in 20 Years

KQED Science | May 2, 2014 | 0 Comments

Citing Budget Concerns, NASA Defends Long-Term Plan To Reach Mars in 20 Years

Recently, NASA administrator Charles Bolden rephrased the "Moon, Mars and Beyond" mission plan to better align the steps toward Mars with budgetary realities and to balance human space programs with more cost-effective robotic missions.

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NOAA Expedition Finds Asphalt Volcanic ‘Tar Lilies’ in Gulf of Mexico

KQED Science | May 1, 2014 | 0 Comments

NOAA Expedition Finds Asphalt Volcanic ‘Tar Lilies’ in Gulf of Mexico

A research expedition in the Gulf of Mexico has stumbled on a field of beautiful natural sculptures made of asphalt on the sea floor.

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Auburn Dam: The Water Project That Won’t Die

KQED Science | April 30, 2014 | 3 Comments

Auburn Dam: The Water Project That Won’t Die

The giant dam and reservoir remains on the radar, whether or not it has a future.

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With Levee Breached, Tides Return to Novato Wetland; Watch Video

KQED Science | April 25, 2014 | 0 Comments

With Levee Breached, Tides Return to Novato Wetland; Watch Video

For more than two decades, environmental groups and numerous agencies have worked to restore the wetlands at the former Hamilton Army Airfield. On Friday, the project achieved a significant milestone.

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Scientists Have Engineered a Version of Bird Flu That Can Spread Between Mammals

KQED Science | April 21, 2014 | 0 Comments

Scientists Have Engineered a Version of Bird Flu That Can Spread Between Mammals

Scientists were able to engineer a version of the bird flu that can spread between mammals, the first step towards turning this virus into a pandemic. This research is controversial as it has created something that is potentially dangerous.

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Biologists’ Paradox: Killing and Collecting Rare Creatures to Prove They’re Not Extinct

KQED Science | April 17, 2014 | 2 Comments

Biologists’ Paradox: Killing and Collecting Rare Creatures to Prove They’re Not Extinct

A group of biologists asks their peers to start documenting newly discovered and "rediscovered" species by non-destructive techniques instead of killing a specimen to bring home.

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<a href=http://blogs.kqed.org/newsfix/2014/04/14/drakes-bay-supreme-court/ target=_blank >Drakes Bay Takes Its Case to Supreme Court</a>

News Fix | April 14, 2014

Drakes Bay Takes Its Case to Supreme Court

Drakes Bay Oyster Company is taking its running battle with the federal government–and environmentalists–to the Supreme Court. The company says it has filed a petition with the high court asking for a review of an unfavorable ruling by the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals. That ruling said federal courts lacked ...Read More

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New Stanford Study Examines Geologic Impact of a Massive Asteroid Collision on Ancient Earth

KQED Science | April 10, 2014 | 1 Comment

New Stanford Study Examines Geologic Impact of a Massive Asteroid Collision on Ancient Earth

A new paper attempts to describe a realistic picture of the unimaginable: a colossal cosmic impact that left a crater 500 kilometers across on the ancient Earth.

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<a href=http://blogs.kqed.org/newsfix/2014/04/09/san-joaquin-river-listed-as-most-endangered-american-river target=_blank >San Joaquin Named Nation’s Most Endangered River</a>

News Fix | April 9, 2014

San Joaquin Named Nation’s Most Endangered River

Two California waterways — one a major Central Valley river, the other a Peninsula creek, and both the subject of controversy — are featured on an annual list of the most endangered U.S. rivers.

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<a href=http://blogs.kqed.org/stateofhealth/2014/04/09/neuroscientists-create-the-art-of-medicine/ target=_blank >In San Francisco, Neuroscientists Create the Art of Medicine</a>

State of Health | April 9, 2014

In San Francisco, Neuroscientists Create the Art of Medicine

You might not expect to find an art gallery at a convention of neuroscientists. ...Read More

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