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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/video/three-california-counties-vote-on-fracking-bans-this-november/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=three-california-counties-vote-on-fracking-bans-this-november target=_blank >Three California Counties Vote on Fracking Bans This November</a>

QUEST | October 27, 2014

Three California Counties Vote on Fracking Bans This November

Santa Barbara, Mendocino and San Benito will decide this November on ballot initiatives that ask voters to ban hydraulic fracturing, the controversial oil- and gas-extraction technique known as “fracking.”

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Berkeley Lab Tackles Global Vaccine Delivery Problem with Portable Solar-Powered Fridge

KQED Science | October 27, 2014 | 0 Comments

Berkeley Lab Tackles Global Vaccine Delivery Problem with Portable Solar-Powered Fridge

Scientists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have developed a portable vaccine solar-power fridge designed to run without power for five days, so vaccines are still viable when they are delivered in remote countries.

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Bay Area Science Festival Kicks Off This Thursday, October 23

KQED Science | October 23, 2014 | 0 Comments

Bay Area Science Festival Kicks Off This Thursday, October 23

The Bay Area Science Festival features events like a bike ride through wetland and a tour of a UPS facility. It begins Thursday, October 23, and will host 56 events over ten days.

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2014/10/22/146095/bigger_than_a_t_rex_with_a_ducks_bill_huge_arms_and_a_hump?source=npr&category=science target=_blank >Bigger Than a T. Rex, With a Duck's Bill, Huge Arms and a Hump</a>

KQED News | October 22, 2014

Bigger Than a T. Rex, With a Duck's Bill, Huge Arms and a Hump

Scientists announced Tuesday they've solved the mystery of the Mongolian ostrich dinosaur. The mystery began in 1965, when fossil hunters found a pair of 6-foot-long, heavily clawed arm bones in Mongolia's Gobi desert. Nobody had seen anything like them before. Now, scientists say, they've got the rest of the beast ... ...Read More

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Bay Area Scientists Artfully Present Their Research in Oakland Exhibit

KQED Science | October 20, 2014 | 0 Comments

Bay Area Scientists Artfully Present Their Research in Oakland Exhibit

“Experimental Space” is the latest show at Oakland art gallery Aggregate Space, consisting of images and videos created by scientists in the course of their research.

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<a href=http://blogs.kqed.org/stateofhealth/2014/10/16/poll-more-than-half-of-americans-worry-about-ebola-outbreak-in-u-s/ target=_blank >Poll: More Than Half of Americans Worry About Ebola Outbreak in U.S.</a>

State of Health | October 16, 2014

Poll: More Than Half of Americans Worry About Ebola Outbreak in U.S.

A Harvard School of Public Health poll finds that more than a third of Americans (38 percent) are worried that Ebola will infect them or a family member over the next year.

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2014/10/08/144955/indonesian_cave_paintings_as_old_as_europes_ancient_art?source=npr&category=science target=_blank >Indonesian Cave Paintings As Old As Europe's Ancient Art</a>

KQED News | October 8, 2014

Indonesian Cave Paintings As Old As Europe's Ancient Art

Prehistoric cave paintings of animals and human hands in Indonesia are as ancient as similar paintings found in Western Europe, according to a new study that suggests humans may have carried this art tradition with them when they migrated out of Africa. "Until now, we've always believed that cave painting was ...Read More

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<a href=http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2014/10/the-forgotten-female-programmers-who-created-modern-tech/ target=_blank >The Forgotten Female Programmers Who Created Modern Tech</a>

Mindshift | October 6, 2014

The Forgotten Female Programmers Who Created Modern Tech

Jean Jennings (left) and Frances Bilas set up the ENIAC in 1946. Bilas is arranging the program settings on the Master Programmer. (Courtesy of University of Pennsylvania)By Laura Sydell If your image of a computer programmer is a young man, there's a good reason: It's true. Recently, many big tech companies ...Read More

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2014/10/02/glowing-plants-city-streets-lit-by-trees/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=glowing-plants-city-streets-lit-by-trees target=_blank >City Streets Could Someday Be Lit by Glowing Trees</a>

QUEST | October 2, 2014

City Streets Could Someday Be Lit by Glowing Trees

San Francisco-based Glowing Plants hopes to engineer trees that can light city streets. For now, the team is working with smaller plants. (Lindsey Hoshaw/KQED) In the basement of a startup lab in San Francisco, scientist Kyle Taylor stands in a dark, windowless room. “I kind of like to have a big ...Read More

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PG&E Tests Tech Adapted From NASA’s Mars Rover

KQED Science | October 2, 2014 | 0 Comments

PG&E Tests Tech Adapted From NASA’s Mars Rover

The sensor is based on a tool that's mounted on NASA's Mars Curiosity rover.

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2014/09/27/144253/india_zooms_to_mars_much_more_cheaply_but_with_tradeoffs?source=npr&category=science target=_blank >India Zooms To Mars Much More Cheaply, But With Trade-Offs</a>

KQED News | September 27, 2014

India Zooms To Mars Much More Cheaply, But With Trade-Offs

Earlier this week, two spacecraft arrived at the planet Mars. One came from India, the other from the U.S. Both are now in orbit and collecting data. But the Indian probe is conducting its mission at a tiny fraction of the cost of its NASA counterpart. "Some of the publicly available ...Read More

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Restoring the Serpentine Prairie Habitat in Oakland

KQED Science | September 26, 2014 | 0 Comments

Restoring the Serpentine Prairie Habitat in Oakland

A highly endangered species exists on the urban edge of Redwood Regional Park in Oakland. Find out what volunteers and the East Bay Regional Park District are doing to protect and restore the serpentine prairie.

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<a href=http://blogs.kqed.org/newsfix/2014/09/24/martins-beach-ruling-superior-court-judge/ target=_blank >Judge Rules for Public Access to Martins Beach</a>

KQED News | September 24, 2014

Judge Rules for Public Access to Martins Beach

A San Mateo County Superior Court judge ruled in favor of plaintiffs today in the protracted legal fight over access to Martins Beach, just south of Half Moon Bay.

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<a href=http://blogs.kqed.org/newsfix/2014/09/22/mount-shasta-glacier-gives-way-causes-mudslide target=_blank >Glacier Breaks, Sends Mudslide Down Mount Shasta</a>

KQED News | September 22, 2014

Glacier Breaks, Sends Mudslide Down Mount Shasta

Mount Shasta as it appeared on a hazy day in late August 2014. (Dan Brekke/KQED) MOUNT SHASTA, Siskiyou County — U.S. Forest Service crews on Mount Shasta were dealing Monday with mud flow from a melting glacier that covered two roads and a bridge in muck, logs and rocks and forced ...Read More

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<a href=http://blogs.kqed.org/newsfix/2014/09/18/california-groundwater-court-case-could-speed-up-regulation/ target=_blank >California Groundwater: Court Case Could Speed Up Regulation</a>

KQED News | September 18, 2014

California Groundwater: Court Case Could Speed Up Regulation

By Daniel Potter The Scott River's flow depends on snow melting off the nearby mountains, but the last few winters haven't delivered. In places, the river disappears underground. (Daniel Potter/KQED) California's Supreme Court is being pressed to take up a case that could dramatically alter oversight for groundwater, building on a landmark ...Read More

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Dancing with Atoms: Innovative Art Advances Computing and Chemistry

KQED Science | September 16, 2014 | 0 Comments

Dancing with Atoms: Innovative Art Advances Computing and Chemistry

We humans are naturally enchanted by life at scales smaller than our own. An imaginative art installation can draw you into the sub-microscopic realm with the compelling immersion of a video game.

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Environmentalists Sue Over Crude-by-Rail Safety

KQED Science | September 12, 2014 | 1 Comment

Environmentalists Sue Over Crude-by-Rail Safety

The environmental group Earthjustice is suing the U.S. Department of Transportation over the safety of the rail cars used to carry crude oil to California and around the country.

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2014/09/11/143011/seaworld_hopes_new_orca_habitats_will_stem_a_tide_of_criticism?source=npr&category=science target=_blank >SeaWorld Hopes New Orca Habitats Will Stem A Tide Of Criticism</a>

KQED News | September 11, 2014

SeaWorld Hopes New Orca Habitats Will Stem A Tide Of Criticism

It's been a strong business year for the nation's theme parks, with a notable exception: SeaWorld. The company, which has parks in San Diego, San Antonio and Orlando, Fla., saw its attendance drop in recent months. The company blames that, in part, on fallout from Blackfish, a documentary film that's critical ...Read More

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California Plans Nation’s Most Detailed Sea Level Database

KQED Science | September 11, 2014 | 1 Comment

California Plans Nation’s Most Detailed Sea Level Database

To help adapt to the increased flood risks affecting people and property along the coast, the San Francisco Bay and inland waterways, California lawmakers sent a bill to Governor Jerry Brown that would direct the state to compile the nation’s most elaborate sea level rise planning database.

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Fixing a Gene in a Fertilized Egg Prevents Muscular Dystrophy (in a Mouse)

KQED Science | September 8, 2014 | 0 Comments

Fixing a Gene in a Fertilized Egg Prevents Muscular Dystrophy (in a Mouse)

Scientists recently fixed a broken gene in a fertilized mouse egg and prevented the mouse from getting an ultimately fatal form of muscular dystrophy. This study may one day translate into gene therapies that will treat and maybe even reverse certain effects of the disease.

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