Donate

Tag: subfeature1

Water Snakes Invading California Threaten Native Species

KQED Science | June 30, 2014 | 0 Comments

Water Snakes Invading California Threaten Native Species

Biologists at UC Davis are growing concerned about the presence of non-native aquatic snakes in California’s waterways.

Continue Reading

<a href=http://blogs.kqed.org/newsfix/2014/06/27/yosemite-land-grant-150th-anniversary target=_blank >Yosemite at 150: From Early Photography to Modern Conservation</a>

News Fix | June 27, 2014

Yosemite at 150: From Early Photography to Modern Conservation

It's been 150 years since Lincoln preserved Yosemite, and the park is celebrating but boosting conservation efforts. ...Read More

Continue Reading

Studying Exoplanets: What A Thousand Points of Light Might Reveal About Earth

KQED Science | June 26, 2014 | 0 Comments

Studying Exoplanets: What A Thousand Points of Light Might Reveal About Earth

As a flood of new exoplanets swim into our ken, we have ways of turning these pixel-size steams of data into insights about our own planet.

Continue Reading

<a href=http://blogs.kqed.org/newsfix/2014/06/24/water-bond-grows-by-4-billion-fails-to-pass-senate/ target=_blank >Water Bond Grows By $4 Billion, Fails To Pass State Senate</a>

News Fix | June 24, 2014

Water Bond Grows By $4 Billion, Fails To Pass State Senate

$10.5 billion plan now includes more money for reservoirs, but not enough to win Republican votes. ...Read More

Continue Reading

<a href=http://blogs.kqed.org/stateofhealth/2014/06/23/study-finds-pesticide-exposure-in-pregnancy-linked-to-autism/ target=_blank >Study Finds Pesticide Exposure in Pregnancy Linked to Autism</a>

State of Health | June 23, 2014

Study Finds Pesticide Exposure in Pregnancy Linked to Autism

Still, the study does not show that pesticide exposure causes autism. ...Read More

Continue Reading

Doctor’s Orders: More Outdoor Time For Kids

KQED Science | June 20, 2014 | 1 Comment

Doctor’s Orders: More Outdoor Time For Kids

Concerned over childhood obesity, an increasing number of doctors are prescribing time outdoors. In Oakland, local parks and a children's hospital have teamed up to get more kids outside.

Continue Reading

<a href=http://blogs.kqed.org/stateofhealth/2014/06/18/california-assembly-rejects-sugary-drink-warning-label/ target=_blank >California Assembly Rejects Sugary Drink Warning Label</a>

State of Health | June 18, 2014

California Assembly Rejects Sugary Drink Warning Label

California would have been first state in the nation to require a health warning label on soda. ...Read More

Continue Reading

ZomBees: Flight of the Living Dead

KQED Science | October 31, 2013 | 2 Comments

ZomBees: Flight of the Living Dead

Something strange and unsettling is happening to Bay Area honeybees. Entomologists at San Francisco State University have identified the culprit: a tiny parasitic fly is causing the bees to exhibit bizarre nocturnal behaviors before suffering a gruesome demise.

Continue Reading

Why Does a Curveball Curve?

KQED Science | October 25, 2013 | 0 Comments

Why Does a Curveball Curve?

With the World Series in full swing, most Americans would probably say they know the basic rules of baseball: the pitcher throws it, the batter hits it, three strikes and you’re out. But underneath it all, the rules that truly govern this game are the laws of physics. “When you go to a ballgame you’re […]

Continue Reading

<a href=http://blogs.kqed.org/newsfix/2013/10/22/rim-fire-before-after-pictures target=_blank >Rim Fire Aftermath: A Stark Look at a Seared Landscape</a>

News Fix | October 23, 2013

Rim Fire Aftermath: A Stark Look at a Seared Landscape

Some lessons of this summer's blaze will take years to be revealed. But the immediate impact is dramatic. ...Read More

Continue Reading

<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2013/10/22/127478/antibiotics_cant_keep_up_with_nightmare_superbugs?source=npr&category=science target=_blank >Antibiotics Can't Keep Up With 'Nightmare' Superbugs</a>

KQED News | October 22, 2013

Antibiotics Can't Keep Up With 'Nightmare' Superbugs

There are now strains of bacteria that are resistant to even the strongest antibiotics, and they're causing deadly infections. On Fresh Air, Terry Gross interviews journalist David Hoffman, who says that understanding and fighting these bacteria should be a national priority.

Continue Reading

Inside the New Tunnel 100 Feet Below San Francisco Bay

KQED Science | October 17, 2013 | 0 Comments

Inside the New Tunnel 100 Feet Below San Francisco Bay

The $286 million tunnel is the first ever to cross under the Bay, and -- once it comes online in 2015 -- will carry 300 million gallons of water a day from the Hetch Hetchy Reservoir to San Francisco and Peninsula residents.

Continue Reading

24 Years Later, The Legacy of Loma Prieta Lives On

KQED Science | October 17, 2013 | 1 Comment

24 Years Later, The Legacy of Loma Prieta Lives On

Nature shows almost no signs of the Loma Prieta earthquake 24 years later. But the human landscape still carries scars that should remind us to practice continual preparedness.

Continue Reading

<a href=http://blogs.kqed.org/stateofhealth/2013/10/16/lead-based-paint-poisoning-still-a-hazard-for-californias-most-vulnerable-children-lawsuit/ target=_blank >Lead-Based Paint Still a Hazard for California’s Most Vulnerable Children</a>

State of Health | October 16, 2013

Lead-Based Paint Still a Hazard for California’s Most Vulnerable Children

By Kelley Weiss, CHCF Center for Health Reporting Children's advocates are hoping for a big Christmas present this year – a billion dollars to remove toxic lead paint from homes. A Santa Clara Superior Court judge has until the end of the year to decide if paint companies should pay ...Read More

Continue Reading

New State Laws on Fracking and Toxics: A Mixed Bag for Environmentalists

KQED Science | October 14, 2013 | 0 Comments

New State Laws on Fracking and Toxics: A Mixed Bag for Environmentalists

Now that California's legislative session is now over, here's a roundup of the environmental bills that passed -- and a review of some big ones that didn't.

Continue Reading

To Protect Wildlife, California Bans Hunting With Lead Bullets

KQED Science | October 11, 2013 | 3 Comments

To Protect Wildlife, California Bans Hunting With Lead Bullets

Governor Jerry Brown has approved the first statewide lead bullet ban for hunters, in the hope of helping endangered California condors.

Continue Reading

<a href=http://www.kqed.org/epArchive/R201310090930?pid=RD19 target=_blank >Cuts in Federal Funding Hurt Scientific Research</a>

Forum | October 9, 2013

Cuts in Federal Funding Hurt Scientific Research

UC Berkeley molecular biologist Randy Schekman won the Nobel Prize for Medicine with two other scientists this week. But he says the kind of basic science research that led to his prize might have never gotten funded if he were applying for grants today. We talk with Schekman and UCSF ...Read More

Continue Reading

NASA Robots Are Sniffing For Clues on Mars and Titan

KQED Science | October 4, 2013 | 0 Comments

NASA Robots Are Sniffing For Clues on Mars and Titan

NASA's Curiosity rover on Mars has raised some eyebrows by something it has not detected: methane. And, much farther out, the Cassini spacecraft has made a positive detection of plastic in the atmosphere of Saturn's moon Titan.

Continue Reading

Carbon Nanotube Computer Paves Way for Faster, Smaller Tech

KQED Science | September 26, 2013 | 1 Comment

Carbon Nanotube Computer Paves Way for Faster, Smaller Tech

The quest for ever-smaller and faster computers has taken a significant step forward. Engineers at Stanford have developed a process to build computers that use carbon nanotubes instead of silicon.

Continue Reading

<a href=http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2013/09/all-hands-on-deck-getting-kids-excited-about-stem/ target=_blank >All Hands On Deck: Getting Kids Excited About STEM</a>

Mindshift | September 25, 2013

All Hands On Deck: Getting Kids Excited About STEM

Most American high school students aren't leaning toward careers in math or science -- actually, they're leaning away. While higher education will need to address reasons kids drop out of math and science majors, professionals in the STEM fields are stepping forward hoping to get younger kids excited ...Read More

Continue Reading