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Tag: full-image

Bay Area: Do You Know Where Your Water Comes From?

KQED Science | February 28, 2014 | 3 Comments

Bay Area: Do You Know Where Your Water Comes From?

No matter where you live in the Bay Area, the answer might surprise you.

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One Galaxy, Many Worlds: Scientists Announce ‘Planet Bonanza’

KQED Science | February 26, 2014 | 1 Comment

One Galaxy, Many Worlds: Scientists Announce ‘Planet Bonanza’

NASA researchers announce they've verified 715 new planets orbiting around 305 stars.

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New Technology Allows for Precise Genetic Engineering in Primates

KQED Science | February 24, 2014 | 2 Comments

New Technology Allows for Precise Genetic Engineering in Primates

Scientists can now make precise, specific changes in the DNA of primates using a new technology first identified in bacteria. Not only will this usher in an age where animal models for human diseases are more useful, but it also means that we are very close to being able to do the same thing in people.

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<a href=http://blogs.kqed.org/newsfix/2014/02/21/federal-water-project-announces-deep-drought-cuts/ target=_blank >Key California Water Project Announces Drastic Cuts as Drought Deepens</a>

News Fix | February 21, 2014

Key California Water Project Announces Drastic Cuts as Drought Deepens

Federal officials announced Friday that many California farmers caught in the state’s drought can expect to receive no irrigation water this year from a vast system of rivers, canals and reservoirs interlacing the state.

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Gas Tax Proposed for California Would Change Existing Climate Law

KQED Science | February 20, 2014 | 12 Comments

Gas Tax Proposed for California Would Change Existing Climate Law

State Senator Darrell Steinberg is proposing a carbon tax on gasoline that would put a price on the pollution that causes climate change. The plan would also dismantle a key piece of California's existing climate law.

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Ticks in the Bay Area Can Carry Lyme Disease – and That’s Not All

KQED Science | February 18, 2014 | 2 Comments

Ticks in the Bay Area Can Carry Lyme Disease – and That’s Not All

Contrary to a common misconception, ticks in the Bay Area can carry the bacteria that causes Lyme Disease. And it turns out local ticks carry another pathogen that can make you sick, too.

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New Trove of Canadian Fossils Expands Knowledge of Cambrian Explosion

KQED Science | February 13, 2014 | 0 Comments

New Trove of Canadian Fossils Expands Knowledge of Cambrian Explosion

A new trove of soft-body fossils promises to expand the range of time and life-forms available to science as we explore the Cambrian Explosion of a half-billion years ago.

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World’s Largest Solar Plant Opens

KQED Science | February 13, 2014 | 0 Comments

World’s Largest Solar Plant Opens

The Ivanpah solar farm, in California’s Mojave Desert about 40 miles south of Las Vegas, will produce enough electricity to power 140,000 homes per year.

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<a href=http://blogs.kqed.org/newsfix/2014/02/05/breaking-rain-forecast-for-bay-area/ target=_blank >Bay Area Rain: The Deluge Is Over; What’s Next?</a>

News Fix | February 5, 2014

Bay Area Rain: The Deluge Is Over; What’s Next?

This morning’s forecast from the National Weather Service Bay Area office in Monterey is calling for a “fairly quiet week” ahead.

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California Drought Could Take a Toll on Electricity Supply

KQED Science | February 4, 2014 | 0 Comments

California Drought Could Take a Toll on Electricity Supply

California's deepening drought could have an effect on the electricity supply. Hydropower usually accounts for about 14 percent of the state's power, but with low reservoir levels, officials are preparing for it to be less.

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Sierra Snow Survey Offers Little Hope as Drought Lingers

KQED Science | January 30, 2014 | 0 Comments

Sierra Snow Survey Offers Little Hope as Drought Lingers

And the clock is ticking toward April 1, when snow accumulation usually peaks.

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California Winemakers Brace for Drought Impacts

KQED Science | January 28, 2014 | 0 Comments

California Winemakers Brace for Drought Impacts

The silver lining: droughts can produce some very memorable wines -- just not as much of them.

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<a href=http://blogs.kqed.org/lowdown/2014/01/23/how-much-water-do-californians-use-each-day-and-what-does-a-20-reduction-look-like/ target=_blank >How Much Water Do Californians Use?</a>

The Lowdown | January 28, 2014

How Much Water Do Californians Use?

During the drought, the state is urging Californians to reduce their water use by 20 percent. So how much water does the average Californian actually consume and what would a 20 percent reduction look like?

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Rosetta Wakes Up for Final Approach to a Comet

KQED Science | January 24, 2014 | 0 Comments

Rosetta Wakes Up for Final Approach to a Comet

On Monday, far beyond the orbit of Mars, an alarm clock went off and a robot began the slow process of waking up after a long, cold sleep. The European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft is now approaching the comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko, which it will catch up with this May.

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Mavericks Surf Competition Is Friday; How and Where to Watch

KQED Science | January 23, 2014 | 0 Comments

Mavericks Surf Competition Is Friday; How and Where to Watch

Tens of thousands of people are expected to descend on Half Moon Bay to watch the big wave surf contest, but the beach and cliffs are off-limits to spectators. If you want to watch the competition, your options are on TV, online or at a festival near the beach.

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2014/01/22/132976/ancient_and_vulnerable_25_percent_of_sharks_and_rays_risk?source=npr&category=science target=_blank >Ancient and Vulnerable: 25 Percent of Sharks and Rays Risk Extinction</a>

KQED News | January 22, 2014

Ancient and Vulnerable: 25 Percent of Sharks and Rays Risk Extinction

There are more than a thousand species of sharks and rays in the world, and nearly a quarter of them are threatened with extinction. That means these ancient types of fish are among the most endangered animals in the world.

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<a href=http://blogs.kqed.org/newsfix/2014/01/16/california-drought-update-governor-jerry-brown-declaring-drought-emergency target=_blank >California Drought Update: Gov. Brown Declares Emergency</a>

News Fix | January 16, 2014

California Drought Update: Gov. Brown Declares Emergency

Gov. Jerry Brown says California is in an "unprecedented, very serious situation," and calls for voluntary 20 percent statewide reduction in water consumption.

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Icebergs and Green Paint: Lessons from California’s Big Droughts

KQED Science | January 16, 2014 | 1 Comment

Icebergs and Green Paint: Lessons from California’s Big Droughts

Importing an Arctic iceberg for freshwater? Painting brown lawns green? California has had some creative ideas for droughts in the past.

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As Toxics Regulations Increase, Companies Simply Switch Chemicals

KQED Science | January 16, 2014 | 0 Comments

As Toxics Regulations Increase, Companies Simply Switch Chemicals

A UCSF researcher explains how public pressure on makeup manufacturers seems to work, and why it's "common sense" to keep plastic dishware out of the microwave.

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New Fukushima Radiation Study Will Focus on West Coast Kelp Forests

KQED Science | January 15, 2014 | 28 Comments

New Fukushima Radiation Study Will Focus on West Coast Kelp Forests

Researchers are launching a new project to monitor California's kelp forests for radiation from the Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan. Scientists will fan out along the California coast to collect kelp and find out if it has absorbed any radiation from the 2011 meltdown.

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