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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2015/01/13/153785/good_news_for_bats_things_are_looking_up_for_stemming_disease?source=npr&category=science target=_blank >Good News for Bats! Things are Looking up for Stemming Disease Spread</a>

KQED News | January 13, 2015

Good News for Bats! Things are Looking up for Stemming Disease Spread

The bat disease known as white-nose syndrome has been spreading fast, killing millions of animals. But for the first time, scientists are seeing hopeful signs that some bat colonies are recovering and new breakthroughs could help researchers develop better strategies for helping bats survive. Back in 2009, it seemed ...Read More

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23andMe Strikes Another Deal With Big Pharma

KQED Science | January 12, 2015 | 1 Comment

23andMe Strikes Another Deal With Big Pharma

The Mountain View-based company will sell genetic information to Pfizer for a study into the genetic markers for lupus.

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<a href=http://ww2.kqed.org/news/2015/01/12/supreme-court-rejects-appeal-of-delta-smelt-ruling target=_blank >Supreme Court Rejects Appeal of Delta Smelt Ruling</a>

KQED News | January 12, 2015

Supreme Court Rejects Appeal of Delta Smelt Ruling

The U.S. Supreme Court has left in place limits on water exports from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta to protect the Delta smelt.

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Tiny Parasite Threatens Native Plants

KQED Science | January 12, 2015 | 6 Comments

Tiny Parasite Threatens Native Plants

A microscopic pathogen got into the roots of some native plants at a restoration project in Alameda County, despite massive efforts to prevent it. Now officials are hoping to stop this microbe before it spreads.

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Scientists Used Modern DNA to Reconstruct Part of a 19th-Century Man’s Genome

KQED Science | January 12, 2015 | 0 Comments

Scientists Used Modern DNA to Reconstruct Part of a 19th-Century Man’s Genome

Until recently, you pretty much had to rely on family stories that were passed down through the generations to learn about your ancestors. But that is now set to change. With a little luck, a whole lot of science and genealogy, you may be able to use passed down DNA instead of stories to learn a bit about that great-great-great-grandfather.

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2015/01/11/153650/a_musical_memorial_for_the_face_of_extinction?source=npr&category=science target=_blank >A Musical Memorial for the Face of Extinction</a>

KQED News | January 11, 2015

A Musical Memorial for the Face of Extinction

Lonesome George was a celebrity tortoise. Millions of humans made the pilgrimage to see him while he lived, and his death was international news. Why? He wasn't particularly large for a Galapagos giant tortoise — just 5 feet long with his neck stretched out, and only 200 pounds. He wasn't particularly ...Read More

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2015/01/10/153636/blood_of_the_tiger_shedding_light_on_chinas_farmedtiger_trade?source=npr&category=science target=_blank >'Blood of The Tiger': Shedding Light on China's Farmed-Tiger Trade</a>

KQED News | January 10, 2015

'Blood of The Tiger': Shedding Light on China's Farmed-Tiger Trade

In 1991, wildlife investigator J. A. Mills went to China to verify rumors about tiger farming. She worked undercover, for the World Wildlife Fund and an organization called Traffic.

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2015/01/09/153509/can_organic_farming_make_perfect_fish?source=npr&category=science target=_blank >Can Organic Farming Make Perfect Fish?</a>

KQED News | January 9, 2015

Can Organic Farming Make Perfect Fish?

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode In Search Of About Dan Barber's TED Talk Chef Dan Barber tackles a dilemma facing many chefs today: how to keep fish on the menu. He chronicles his search for a fish that would please both diners and environmentalists. About Dan Barber Dan Barber ...Read More

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2015/01/09/153512/what_did_it_take_to_find_the_giant_squid?source=npr&category=science target=_blank >What Did It Take To Find The Giant Squid?</a>

KQED News | January 9, 2015

What Did It Take To Find The Giant Squid?

Humans have been looking for the giant squid for decades. Oceanographer Edith Widder shares how innovative technology helped her capture the squid on video for the first time.

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2015/01/09/153506/why_should_we_search_for_et?source=npr&category=science target=_blank >Why Should We Search For ET?</a>

KQED News | January 9, 2015

Why Should We Search For ET?

Will we find ET in the next 25 years? Seth Shostak, senior astronomer at SETI, says yes. He explains that new technologies and the laws of probability make the breakthrough likely.

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New Horizons Spacecraft Wakes up for Its Historic Fly-by of Pluto

KQED Science | January 9, 2015 | 1 Comment

New Horizons Spacecraft Wakes up for Its Historic Fly-by of Pluto

Only 84 years after its discovery in 1930 by Clyde Tombaugh, it is the eve of our first-ever close-up look at everyone’s favorite dwarf planet, Pluto. NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft will make a fly-by on July 14th, after a high-speed, nine-year voyage.

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/epArchive/R201501071000?pid=RD19 target=_blank >Study Shows Earning Differences Between Left- and Right-Handed People</a>

Forum | January 8, 2015

Study Shows Earning Differences Between Left- and Right-Handed People

We've all heard the stereotype that left-handed people are more creative than their right-handed counterparts. But recent research seems to indicate that lefties, about 12 percent of the population, score lower on cognitive tests.

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New Soil Erosion Study May Help Sustainable Farming Practices

KQED Science | January 8, 2015 | 1 Comment

New Soil Erosion Study May Help Sustainable Farming Practices

A new way of measuring soil erosion in the geologically recent past, before modern civilization, may help put sustainable agriculture on a firmer footing.

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Foie Gras: Back on California Menus

KQED Science | January 8, 2015 | 2 Comments

Foie Gras: Back on California Menus

Chefs from Los Angeles to San Francisco celebrated on Wednesday when a federal judge lifted a statewide ban on foie gras.

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2014: California’s Warmest Year on Record

KQED Science | January 8, 2015 | 2 Comments

2014: California’s Warmest Year on Record

Drought conditions were compounded by high temps despite a "near-average" precipitation year.

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<a href=http://blogs.kqed.org/stateofhealth/2015/01/07/nine-measles-cases-tied-to-disneyland-parks/ target=_blank >Nine Measles Cases Tied to Disneyland Parks</a>

State of Health | January 7, 2015

Nine Measles Cases Tied to Disneyland Parks

(Marsaili McGrath/Getty Images) Nine people who visited Disneyland or Disneyland California Adventure Park during December have confirmed measles cases, state health officials said Wednesday. Seven of the patients live in California and two live in Utah.

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Hot, Unfriendly Skies Could Alter Flights

KQED Science | January 7, 2015 | 0 Comments

Hot, Unfriendly Skies Could Alter Flights

Transatlantic flights could encounter more turbulence in a warming world, which would affect millions of people.

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<a href=http://ww2.kqed.org/news/2015/01/07/brown-history-will-affirm-wisdom-of-building-bullet-train target=_blank >Brown: History Will Affirm Wisdom of Building Bullet Train</a>

KQED News | January 7, 2015

Brown: History Will Affirm Wisdom of Building Bullet Train

Gov. Jerry Brown began his fourth term as governor by acting on a promise to bring a bullet train to California, signing a symbolic piece of railroad track at a groundbreaking ceremony held on an empty lot in downtown Fresno Tuesday.

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<a href=http://ww2.kqed.org/news/2014/01/07/tidal-waters-in-san-pablo-national-wildlife-refuge-back-after-more-than-century/ target=_blank >Tidal Waters in San Pablo National Wildlife Refuge Back After More than a Century</a>

KQED News | January 7, 2015

Tidal Waters in San Pablo National Wildlife Refuge Back After More than a Century

As an eager crowd of conservationists gathers to watch an excavator scoop out the final portion of the old levee at the historic Cullinan Ranch, located at the north end of San Pablo Bay, it seems even Mother Nature can't wait.

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The Fantastic Fur of Sea Otters

KQED Science | January 6, 2015 | 1 Comment

The Fantastic Fur of Sea Otters

Sea otters aren’t just cute -- they’re a vivid example of life on the edge. Unlike whales and other ocean mammals, sea otters have no blubber. Yet they're still able to keep warm in the frigid Pacific waters. The secret to their survival? A fur coat like no other.

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