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As Delta Smelt Nears Extinction, New Concerns Emerge Over Dredging

KQED Science | May 13, 2015 | 2 Comments

As Delta Smelt Nears Extinction, New Concerns Emerge Over Dredging

The tiny Delta smelt is famous for being a target in California's water wars, but it's dangerously close to extinction. That's bringing attention to anything that could harm the fish, including something rarely discussed: dredging Delta waterways for big cargo ships.

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<a href=http://blogs.kqed.org/education/2015/05/12/would-you-eat-insects/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=would-you-eat-insects target=_blank >Would You Eat Insects?</a>

KQED Science | May 12, 2015

Would You Eat Insects?

From KQED Education Do Now: The California drought is bringing increased attention to resource use in agriculture--not only within the state, but around the world. With a growing global population, use of land and water resources will have to change to meet future demand for animal protein. Would you eat insects as part of a sustainable, earth-friendly diet?

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/epArchive/R201505121000?pid=RD19 target=_blank >Water Expert Calls For Market-Based Solution to Supply Shortages</a>

Forum | May 12, 2015

Water Expert Calls For Market-Based Solution to Supply Shortages

Is California's water too cheap? The drought is prompting many questions about the way water is allocated and priced. As part of our Drought Watch series, we'll look at proposals to reform the system with University of Arizona water expert Robert Glennon, who has advocated for free-market approaches to water-supply ...Read More

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<a href=http://ww2.kqed.org/futureofyou/2015/05/12/everyone-should-track-their-blood-sugar-not-just-people-with-diabetes-like-me/ target=_blank >Everyone Should Track Their Blood Sugar — Not Just People With Diabetes Like Me</a>

KQED Science | May 12, 2015

Everyone Should Track Their Blood Sugar — Not Just People With Diabetes Like Me

This is a perspective from Cyrus Khambatta, a person with Type 1 Diabetes and the founder of Mangoman Nutrition and Fitness Continuous glucose monitoring, which uses tiny sensors under the skin to check blood sugar levels, is going to be a very big deal — and not just for people ...Read More

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<a href=http://ww2.kqed.org/news/2015/05/12/water-flows-freely-in-drought-resistant-farm-towns-of-southern-california-for-now target=_blank >Water Flows Freely in Drought-Resistant Farm Towns of Southern California — For Now</a>

KQED News | May 12, 2015

Water Flows Freely in Drought-Resistant Farm Towns of Southern California — For Now

Thanks to so-called first-in-time federal agreements established nearly 100 years ago, Imperial County drinks up the lion’s share of Colorado River water that flows into Southern California, buffering it from much of the drought anxiety gripping the rest of the state.

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<a href=http://ww2.kqed.org/stateofhealth/2015/05/12/measles-can-suppress-immunity-up-to-3-years-increasing-risk-of-other-illnesses/ target=_blank >Measles Can Suppress Immunity Up to 3 Years, Increasing Risk of Other Illnesses</a>

State of Health | May 12, 2015

Measles Can Suppress Immunity Up to 3 Years, Increasing Risk of Other Illnesses

Back in the 1960s, the U.S. started vaccinating kids for measles. As expected, children stopped getting measles. But something else happened. Childhood deaths from all infectious diseases plummeted. Even deaths from diseases like pneumonia and diarrhea were cut by half. Scientists saw the same phenomenon when the vaccine came to England and parts ...Read More

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<a href=http://ww2.kqed.org/news/2015/05/11/after-a-fiery-speech-a-top-secret-job-offer-in-the-desert target=_blank >After a Fiery Speech, a Top-Secret Job Offer in the Desert</a>

KQED News | May 11, 2015

After a Fiery Speech, a Top-Secret Job Offer in the Desert

As part of a series called My Big Break, All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers. Listen to the audio from “My Big Break” below: <audio preload="none" ...Read More

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<a href=http://ww2.kqed.org/futureofyou/2015/05/11/patient-advocates-fight-for-access-to-medical-data-its-a-matter-of-life-and-death/ target=_blank >Patient Advocates Fight for Access to Medical Data: ‘It’s a Matter of Life and Death’</a>

KQED Science | May 11, 2015

Patient Advocates Fight for Access to Medical Data: ‘It’s a Matter of Life and Death’

For Julia Hallisy, putting medical information into the hands of patients isn't just a professional crusade; it's a personal one. Hallisy learned the hard way that patients and their families, and not just doctors, can benefit from accessing personal medical documents, including scans, test results and written notes. That's because her daughter ...Read More

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2015/05/11/162600/the_great_beyond_contemplating_life_sex_and_elevators_in_space?source=npr&category=science target=_blank >The Great 'Beyond': Contemplating Life, Sex And Elevators In Space</a>

KQED News | May 11, 2015

The Great 'Beyond': Contemplating Life, Sex And Elevators In Space

The possibility of humans colonizing outer space may seem like the stuff of science fiction, but British astronomer Chris Impey says that, if only the U.S. hadn't slashed the budget of its space program four years ago, the sci-fi fantasy would be well on its way to a modern-day ...Read More

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Will California Drought Force Changes In Historic Water Rights?

KQED Science | May 11, 2015 | 18 Comments

Will California Drought Force Changes In Historic Water Rights?

Here’s the thing: Water rights in California are based on who got there first. It’s as if you had to line up with all your coworkers to get a cup of coffee at work, and maybe the pot’s empty when the new guy gets to the front. Some are asking, in a drought like the one we’ve been having, is that really fair?

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2015/05/11/162575/two_guys_in_paris_aim_to_charm_the_world_into_climate_action?source=npr&category=science target=_blank >Two Guys In Paris Aim To Charm The World Into Climate Action</a>

KQED News | May 11, 2015

Two Guys In Paris Aim To Charm The World Into Climate Action

Here's a job that sounds perfect for either a superhero or a glutton for punishment: Get nearly 200 countries to finally agree to take serious action on climate change. Two men have willingly — willingly! — taken on this challenge. They're leading some international negotiations that will wrap up later this ...Read More

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2015/05/09/162509/if_science_could_clone_a_mammoth_could_it_save_an_elephant?source=npr&category=science target=_blank >If Science Could 'Clone A Mammoth,' Could It Save An Elephant?</a>

KQED News | May 9, 2015

If Science Could 'Clone A Mammoth,' Could It Save An Elephant?

It's been more than 20 years since Jurassic Park came out, and scientists have been cloning animals almost as long. So where are the baby velociraptors already? In Russia, there is a park all ready for woolly mammoths and scientists there say it's just a matter of time before they can ...Read More

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<a href=http://ww2.kqed.org/lowdown/2015/05/08/what-mandatory-water-cuts-in-cities-throughout-california-look-like-in-three-interactive-maps/ target=_blank >What Mandatory Water Cuts in Cities throughout California Look Like, in Three Interactive Maps</a>

The Lowdown | May 8, 2015

What Mandatory Water Cuts in Cities throughout California Look Like, in Three Interactive Maps

California is entering uncharted territory. And very dry uncharted territory at that. The state water board on Tuesday unanimously approved emergency drought regulations in an effort reduce urban use statewide by 25 percent over the next nine months. A response to California's historic 4-year drought, ...Read More

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2015/05/08/162456/in_rise_of_animals_sir_david_attenborough_tells_story_of?source=npr&category=science target=_blank >In 'Rise Of Animals,' Sir David Attenborough Tells Story Of Vertebrates</a>

KQED News | May 8, 2015

In 'Rise Of Animals,' Sir David Attenborough Tells Story Of Vertebrates

Famed British broadcaster and naturalist Sir David Attenborough has been lending his calming voice to nature documentaries ever since TV was in black and white. And the 89-year-old is still at it. His new two-part special called Rise of Animals: Triumph of the Vertebrates premieres May 13 on The ...Read More

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<a href=http://ww2.kqed.org/news/2015/05/08/cattle-ranchers-lock-horns-with-almond-investors target=_blank >Cattle Ranchers Lock Horns with Almond Investors</a>

KQED News | May 8, 2015

Cattle Ranchers Lock Horns with Almond Investors

Kathy Smith actually heard the almonds coming before she saw them. “It's 11:30 at night, we are trying to sleep, and those tractors are ripping the land right outside our bedroom,” she recalls. She woke up to find giant patches carved out of the grassy foothills above her house, making way ...Read More

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<a href=http://ww2.kqed.org/futureofyou/2015/05/08/dna-printing-a-big-boon-to-research-but-some-raise-concerns/ target=_blank >DNA ‘Printing’ a Big Boon to Research, But Some Raise Concerns</a>

KQED Science | May 8, 2015

DNA ‘Printing’ a Big Boon to Research, But Some Raise Concerns

Companies are assembling and churning out tailored stretches of DNA faster and more cheaply than ever before. The tool speeds research into diseases of plants and people. But what about eugenics?

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Bird Watching “Big Day” Goes Global

KQED Science | May 8, 2015 | 0 Comments

Bird Watching “Big Day” Goes Global

Learn how amateur bird watchers are contributing to the knowledge of our planet's biodiversity with an online tool and a new, global effort.

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/video/science-spotlight-bending-light-with-a-new-kind-of-microscope/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=science-spotlight-bending-light-with-a-new-kind-of-microscope target=_blank >Science Spotlight: Bending Light with a New Kind of Microscope</a>

QUEST | May 7, 2015

Science Spotlight: Bending Light with a New Kind of Microscope

Article by Lauren Farrar Manu Prakash, a bioengineer at Stanford University, has created a fully functional microscope out of waterproof paper that uses teeny-tiny lenses to magnify objects. He calls it a Foldscope. The different parts of the microscope are printed on paper, which the user punches out and folds together. ...Read More

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2015/05/07/162371/california_prepares_for_difficult_fire_season_amid_drought?source=npr&category=science target=_blank >California Prepares For Difficult Fire Season Amid Drought</a>

KQED News | May 7, 2015

California Prepares For Difficult Fire Season Amid Drought

Fires are more dangerous when vegetation is dry, and water sources may be more difficult to find.

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<a href=http://ww2.kqed.org/futureofyou/2015/05/07/how-these-mobile-apps-are-helping-couples-conceive/ target=_blank >How These Mobile Apps are Helping Couples Conceive</a>

KQED Science | May 7, 2015

How These Mobile Apps are Helping Couples Conceive

Mobile devices are teaching modern women something their ancient counterparts knew thousands of years ago: How to track fertility. This may seem like a niche opportunity, but a sizable chunk of the U.S. population suffers from fertility issues. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 6.7 million women ...Read More

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