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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2010/03/26/sun-earth-day-magnetic-magic/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=sun-earth-day-magnetic-magic target=_blank >Sun-Earth Day: Magnetic Magic</a>

QUEST | March 26, 2010

Sun-Earth Day: Magnetic Magic

Iron filings reveal the pattern of a magnet's invisible force field.Saturday, March 20th, was not only Vernal Equinox, but the annual Sun-Earth Day: a NASA-promoted effort around the country to focus attention on the special connections between the Sun and the Earth. This year's theme: Magnetic ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/audio/the-godfather-of-green/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=the-godfather-of-green target=_blank >The Godfather of Green</a>

QUEST | February 15, 2010

The Godfather of Green

Art Rosenfeld is retiring, stepping down from his post with the California Energy Commission. The 83-year-old nuclear physicist pushed California to enact some of the toughest energy efficiency standards in the world. QUEST talks with Rosenfeld about his passion for saving kilowatts. Andrea Kissack reports. ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2010/02/12/reporters-notes-the-godfather-of-conservation/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=reporters-notes-the-godfather-of-conservation target=_blank >Reporter's Notes: The Godfather of Green</a>

QUEST | February 12, 2010

Reporter's Notes: The Godfather of Green

Don’t forget to turn off the lights next time you leave a room. You’ll make an 83-year-old physicist, with a passion for saving kilowatts, very happy Do you know what the biggest energy drain is on your house? Well, if you don’t have a hot tub, it’s heating ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2010/02/08/try-these-at-home-2-exploring-buoyancy/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=try-these-at-home-2-exploring-buoyancy target=_blank >Try These At Home 2: Exploring Buoyancy</a>

QUEST | February 8, 2010

Try These At Home 2: Exploring Buoyancy

The Cartesian Diver: this is a classic demo named after the17th-century philosopher and mathematician Ren

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2010/01/26/welcome-to-the-year-of-the-laser/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=welcome-to-the-year-of-the-laser target=_blank >Welcome to the Year of the Laser</a>

QUEST | January 26, 2010

Welcome to the Year of the Laser

Perhaps no single development of the last century has been more influential or more important than the laser. The concept of discovery is a powerful sentiment in science. Television’s Discovery Channel and print journalism’s Discover Magazine have folded the word into their identities, and as a child that my iconic ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2009/12/28/dark-matter-tests-positive-sort-of%E2%80%A6/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=dark-matter-tests-positive-sort-of%25e2%2580%25a6 target=_blank >Dark Matter Tests Positive (Sort of)</a>

QUEST | December 28, 2009

Dark Matter Tests Positive (Sort of)

The first evidence for dark matter came from Fritz Zwicky’s observation of the Coma Galaxy Cluster. Image Credit: NASA, JPL-Caltech, SDSS, Leigh Jenkins, Ann Hornschemeier (Goddard Space Flight Center), et al. Dark matter (think of matter as a fancy word for stuff) is one of the most exciting but also ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/audio/web-extra-photosynthesis-and-foosball/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=web-extra-photosynthesis-and-foosball target=_blank >Web Extra: Photosynthesis and Foosball</a>

QUEST | November 21, 2009

Web Extra: Photosynthesis and Foosball

Photosynthesis seems like a simple process, but scientists are still trying to understand how it works. They've discovered that plants may be using quantum physics. As Lauren Sommer found out, the best way to understand it is through foosball. ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2009/11/16/unlocking-the-mysteries-of-graphene/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=unlocking-the-mysteries-of-graphene target=_blank >Unlocking the Mysteries of Graphene</a>

QUEST | November 16, 2009

Unlocking the Mysteries of Graphene

Electron microscope image of a hole embedded within a sheet of graphene. The corners of the green hexagons are carbon atoms which form graphene’s crystal structure. Image courtesy of the Zettl Research Group, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and University of California at Berkeley. Acquiring a sample of graphene is almost ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2009/11/02/50-years-later-still-plenty-of-room-at-the-bottom/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=50-years-later-still-plenty-of-room-at-the-bottom target=_blank >50 Years Later, Still Plenty of Room at the Bottom</a>

QUEST | November 2, 2009

50 Years Later, Still Plenty of Room at the Bottom

Lawrence Berkeley Lab's TEAM 0.5 is capable of resolving individual carbon atoms in the honeycomb crystal structure of graphene. See QUEST's video The World's Most Powerful Microscope for more information. Image source: Nano LettersThe twentieth century’s most important physicist after Albert Einstein is almost certainly Richard Feynman. ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2009/10/22/science-event-pick-boss-of-the-night-sky/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=science-event-pick-boss-of-the-night-sky target=_blank >Science Event Pick: BOSS of the Night Sky</a>

QUEST | October 22, 2009

Science Event Pick: BOSS of the Night Sky

The Sloan Telescope used to conduct BOSS A long time ago in a galaxy far far away…Well, to be precise, 14 billion years ago and at the beginning of the universe was the Big Bang. Ever since that moment, our universe has been expanding, but over the last 7 ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2009/10/19/the-large-hadron-collider-gets-ready-to-spin-again/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=the-large-hadron-collider-gets-ready-to-spin-again target=_blank >The Large Hadron Collider Gets Ready to Spin Again</a>

QUEST | October 20, 2009

The Large Hadron Collider Gets Ready to Spin Again

The Large Hadron Collider, if located in the Bay Area, would encompass a sizable piece of San Francisco. Image Credit: NASA.In about one month the world’s biggest science experiment, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland, will once again fire up. So now may be ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2009/10/09/equinox-on-saturn-reveals-ring-ripples/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=equinox-on-saturn-reveals-ring-ripples target=_blank >Equinox on Saturn Reveals Ring Ripples</a>

QUEST | October 10, 2009

Equinox on Saturn Reveals Ring Ripples

Bumps and ripples in the otherwise flat ring system of Saturn cast long shadows at equinox. Image credit: NASA/CassiniImagine a vast, flat plain spreading out before you for tens of thousands of miles in all directions, with no Earthly curvature to give the horizon its slightly finite look. ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2009/09/08/try-these-at-home-2-sure-fire-science-demo-classics/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=try-these-at-home-2-sure-fire-science-demo-classics target=_blank >Try These at Home: 2 Sure-fire Science Demo Classics</a>

QUEST | September 8, 2009

Try These at Home: 2 Sure-fire Science Demo Classics

Water and cornstarch make a non-Newtonian fluid when mixed: messy but great fun!Sixth grade was a big year for science fair projects in my hometown. I was fascinated by sound and decided to test whether high or low pitches traveled more easily. In principle this could have been a ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/video/scary-tsunamis/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=scary-tsunamis target=_blank >Scary Tsunamis</a>

QUEST | July 29, 2009

Scary Tsunamis

Is California at risk? In 2004, a massive tsunami struck the Indian Ocean. More than 225,000 people were killed. Bay Area researchers raced to the scene to learn everything they could about these deadly forces of nature. The information they gained provides a 'Rosetta stone' for helping to understand the ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2009/07/28/producers-notes-scary-tsunamis/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=producers-notes-scary-tsunamis target=_blank >Producer's Notes: Scary Tsunamis</a>

QUEST | July 28, 2009

Producer's Notes: Scary Tsunamis

The Great Wave off Kanagawa is often mistakenly associated with the Tsunami. "If a tree falls in a forest and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound?" The philosopher George Berkeley posed this philosophical question and a quick internet search found a somewhat ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/video/quest-lab-newtons-laws-of-motion/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=quest-lab-newtons-laws-of-motion target=_blank >QUEST Lab: Newton's Laws of Motion</a>

QUEST | July 15, 2009

QUEST Lab: Newton's Laws of Motion

Paul Doherty of the Exploratorium performs a "sit-down" lecture on one of Sir Issac Newton's most famous laws. Tags: exploratorium, kqed, motion, Newton's Laws, pbs, Physics, QUEST ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2009/07/03/far-out-man-measuring-astronomical-distances/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=far-out-man-measuring-astronomical-distances target=_blank >Far Out, Man: Measuring Astronomical Distances</a>

QUEST | July 3, 2009

Far Out, Man: Measuring Astronomical Distances

Centuries ago the stars were believed to reside just beyond the planets of our solar system.It never fails to astound me how big the Universe is—how far away even the nearest stars are, let alone other galaxies scattered from here to near infinity…. How do we know how far away ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2009/06/29/new-nanoparticles-shed-light-on-cell-behavior/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=new-nanoparticles-shed-light-on-cell-behavior target=_blank >New Nanoparticles Shed Light on Cell Behavior</a>

QUEST | June 29, 2009

New Nanoparticles Shed Light on Cell Behavior

(left) A cell imaged with an optical microscope. (right) The same cell imaged by allowing the cell to absorb UCNPs and then irradiating it with infrared light. Each nanocrystal is one thousand times smaller than the width of a human hair. Image courtesy of PNAS."Like a silent black mist, ...

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