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Blue Oaks Shine New Light on California’s Past Climate

KQED Science | September 12, 2013 | 0 Comments

Blue Oaks Shine New Light on California’s Past Climate

A new climate chronology for California has come from one of our quintessential trees, the blue oak.

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How California’s Warping Microplate Makes Its Faults Creep

KQED Science | September 5, 2013 | 1 Comment

How California’s Warping Microplate Makes Its Faults Creep

A tectonic "Big Drip" beneath the southern Sierra Nevada is connected to the creeping faults of Northern California in a new paper published in Geology.

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A Lifetime Later, a New Plan to Drill Down to the Earth’s Mantle

KQED Science | August 22, 2013 | 6 Comments

A Lifetime Later, a New Plan to Drill Down to the Earth’s Mantle

After a wait of more than 50 years, the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program is ready to return to the site of Project Mohole to try and pierce the Earth's crust again.

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Rare Meteorite Lands Permanently at UC Davis

KQED Science | August 21, 2013 | 0 Comments

Rare Meteorite Lands Permanently at UC Davis

UC Davis is acquiring a chunk of meteorite that landed in Northern California last year. The meteorite's age makes it rare and valuable. It contains dust from ancient stars that exploded, the same stuff that eventually formed our solar system.

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Take a Hike at Watershed Lands in the Bay Area

KQED Science | August 15, 2013 | 0 Comments

Take a Hike at Watershed Lands in the Bay Area

Watershed lands aren’t destinations, like state or national parks. Their natural features aren’t unusual, and to me that’s a key part of their charm.

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Lost and Found: The 1906 Earthquake Rupture in Portola Valley

KQED Science | August 8, 2013 | 0 Comments

Lost and Found: The 1906 Earthquake Rupture in Portola Valley

New tools and old-fashioned sleuthing have cleared away a century's worth of errors from our detailed picture of what the San Andreas fault did to Portola Valley in 1906.

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The Temptation to Treat Hunches As Science in Earthquake Prediction Research

KQED Science | August 1, 2013 | 8 Comments

The Temptation to Treat Hunches As Science in Earthquake Prediction Research

The science of earthquake prediction is fraught with the human tendency to seek conclusions beyond the reach of the data. In this setting, even the fruitless hypothesis of sunspots is seductive.

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Is Shale A More Realistic Candidate for Nuclear Waste Sites?

KQED Science | July 25, 2013 | 1 Comment

Is Shale A More Realistic Candidate for Nuclear Waste Sites?

Spent reactor fuel and other high-level radioactive wastes may be better off in soft rocks than hard ones.

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East Bay Building Demolition to Provide Rare Earthquake Insights

KQED Science | July 22, 2013 | 0 Comments

East Bay Building Demolition to Provide Rare Earthquake Insights

Scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey are looking for volunteers in the East Bay to help document a powerful seismic event in mid-August, when a 13-story building on the California State University, East Bay campus will come crashing down, making way for a new, seismically stable replacement.

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Submarine Searches For Seismic Clues Beneath Lake Tahoe

KQED Science | July 19, 2013 | 0 Comments

Submarine Searches For Seismic Clues Beneath Lake Tahoe

Every 4,000 years, there's an earthquake beneath Lake Tahoe. A robotic submarine is spending the week below the lake’s surface, using high-definition cameras and ultrasound-like technology to examine the lake's biggest fault.

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A Geological Jewel Stands Out In Future East Bay Parklands

KQED Science | July 18, 2013 | 0 Comments

A Geological Jewel Stands Out In Future East Bay Parklands

Long-range plans by the East Bay Regional Parks District promise at least one geological jewel.

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A Possible Warning Sign for Human-Caused Earthquakes

KQED Science | July 11, 2013 | 1 Comment

A Possible Warning Sign for Human-Caused Earthquakes

In today’s issue of Science, a team of researchers reports that injection fields approaching an earthquake-ready state may give us a telltale sign: seismic waves sweeping through from huge distant shocks set off tiny local shakers in the process called dynamic triggering.

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Bay Area’s Best Geology Museum: Children’s Natural History Museum

KQED Science | June 20, 2013 | 1 Comment

Bay Area’s Best Geology Museum: Children’s Natural History Museum

The best all-around geological museum in the Bay Area is in Fremont, catering to tomorrow's scientists and their teachers.

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Curiosity Prepares to Set Forth From Base Camp At Last

KQED Science | June 14, 2013 | 0 Comments

Curiosity Prepares to Set Forth From Base Camp At Last

After ten months of studying a small patch of Mars half a mile from its landing point, NASA's Curiosity rover pulls up stakes, packs its bags and prepares to set forth on a trek to reach the base of Mount Sharp, a layered mound of Martian geologic history with secrets just waiting to be discovered.

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Opening the Gene Box of a Key Ocean Species

KQED Science | June 13, 2013 | 2 Comments

Opening the Gene Box of a Key Ocean Species

The genome of the one-celled alga Emiliania huxleyi, the most important species you've never heard of, is now open for business.

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California’s Looming Sand-and-Gravel Crunch

KQED Science | June 6, 2013 | 0 Comments

California’s Looming Sand-and-Gravel Crunch

A new map of sand and gravel resources from government geologists is alerting us that California cities and regions must keep thinking locally to keep prospering.

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Sizing Up Tsunamis By Their Sound Waves

KQED Science | June 5, 2013 | 0 Comments

Sizing Up Tsunamis By Their Sound Waves

Scientists at Stanford may have found a way to build a better warning system for tsunamis. The key is listening for the earthquake's sonic signature.

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2013/05/31/drinking-local-the-taste-of-tap/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=drinking-local-the-taste-of-tap target=_blank >The Terroir of Tap</a>

QUEST | May 31, 2013

The Terroir of Tap

Where tap water gets its flavor – and why one chef sees it as the key to making the perfect pizza dough. »

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Oakland Museum’s Nature Section Is Back in Business

KQED Science | May 30, 2013 | 0 Comments

Oakland Museum’s Nature Section Is Back in Business

In the new Gallery of California Natural Sciences, to be unveiled tomorrow, no one will mistake California for someplace else again.

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California’s Vanishing Glaciers: A Defining Moment

KQED Science | May 27, 2013

California’s Vanishing Glaciers: A Defining Moment

The Lyell and Maclure glaciers in Yosemite – like glaciers and ice sheets worldwide – are in rapid state of retreat. The Lyell and Maclure were presumed to be “true” glaciers – that is, thick slabs of ice dragged downhill under their own weight, scouring the land as they move – but scientists are discovering that the Maclure is deteriorating as it moves, and the Lyell is no longer moving at all.

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