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As Toxics Regulations Increase, Companies Simply Switch Chemicals

KQED Science | January 16, 2014 | 0 Comments

As Toxics Regulations Increase, Companies Simply Switch Chemicals

A UCSF researcher explains how public pressure on makeup manufacturers seems to work, and why it's "common sense" to keep plastic dishware out of the microwave.

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Spare-the-Air Days: How They Make the Call

KQED Science | December 30, 2013 | 0 Comments

Spare-the-Air Days: How They Make the Call

Making the call a day ahead of time requires a blend of art and science -- and regulators aren't always right.

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It’s Official: Toxic Flame Retardants No Longer Required in Furniture

KQED Science | November 21, 2013 | 26 Comments

It’s Official: Toxic Flame Retardants No Longer Required in Furniture

California overturns a nearly 40-year-old law that made your sofa potentially menacing.

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Soy and Dry Ice Among San Francisco’s New Tricks to Banish City Graffiti

KQED Science | November 14, 2013 | 1 Comment

Soy and Dry Ice Among San Francisco’s New Tricks to Banish City Graffiti

San Francisco cleans up a lot of graffiti every year. In the past, the city has used standard industrial solvents for this task, but now, workers will be cleaning up with non-toxic materials, in an effort to protect people and reduce toxic runoff.

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Silicon Valley in Race for Battery Breakthrough

KQED Science | November 1, 2013 | 4 Comments

Silicon Valley in Race for Battery Breakthrough

The global battery race is on and the Bay Area is in it to win.

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New State Laws on Fracking and Toxics: A Mixed Bag for Environmentalists

KQED Science | October 14, 2013 | 0 Comments

New State Laws on Fracking and Toxics: A Mixed Bag for Environmentalists

Now that California's legislative session is now over, here's a roundup of the environmental bills that passed -- and a review of some big ones that didn't.

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New Rules for Lake Tahoe Development Give Locals More Leverage

KQED Science | October 14, 2013 | 0 Comments

New Rules for Lake Tahoe Development Give Locals More Leverage

California governor Jerry Brown signed legislation over the weekend that reaffirms the state’s commitment to working with Nevada to preserve Lake Tahoe.

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Watsonville Lacks Funds to Control Toxic Algae, Threatening Wildlife

KQED Science | October 4, 2013 | 1 Comment

Watsonville Lacks Funds to Control Toxic Algae, Threatening Wildlife

The city of Watsonville has an expensive problem on its hands: toxic algae stirred up from the bottom of Pinto Lake makes the lake poisonous to humans and deadly to birds, fish, and even the otters in Monterey Bay, where the lake water eventually empties into the sea. Knowing how to clean it is one thing; paying for it is another.

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Flame Retardants Fade Faster From Our Bodies Than Expected

KQED Science | September 25, 2013 | 0 Comments

Flame Retardants Fade Faster From Our Bodies Than Expected

Researchers wanted to know: Now that they've been banned, how soon would a controversial class of flame retardants called PBDEs start disappearing from women's bodies? The answer: Sooner than they thought.

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Wildfires a Growing Air Quality Issue

KQED Science | August 26, 2013 | 0 Comments

Wildfires a Growing Air Quality Issue

Major wildfires like California's Rim Fire, near Yosemite, are also long-distance air polluters.

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Who Profits from Proposition 65? (Part Two)

KQED Science | July 7, 2013 | 0 Comments

Who Profits from Proposition 65? (Part Two)

Proposition 65 is enforced by, among others, a small and little-known subculture of "private enforcers," and their attorneys who profit from settlements with businesses found to be in violation of the law. Critics call it a "cottage industry;" others say it's an efficient way to protect consumers from toxic chemicals.

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Who Profits from Proposition 65?  (Part One)

KQED Science | June 29, 2013 | 2 Comments

Who Profits from Proposition 65? (Part One)

Proposition 65 was passed by voters in order to reduce Californian's exposure to toxic chemicals. Now there's an effort in Sacramento to revise the law, amid charges that it's prompted a flood of frivolous lawsuits that make millions of dollars for a select few and cause undue headaches for thousands of California businesses.

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An Environmental Catch-22: Fire Safety Chemicals in Insulation Pose Risks

KQED Science | June 26, 2013 | 8 Comments

An Environmental Catch-22: Fire Safety Chemicals in Insulation Pose Risks

Mounting research questions the safety and effectiveness of flame retardants used in consumer products. The chemicals are also used in the foam plastic insulation that improves energy efficiency in buildings. But a measure that just passed a Senate committee this week could pave the way for fire-safe, energy-efficient buildings without causing harm.

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Breast-Feeding Neanderthals Would Get Top Marks From Today’s Pediatricians

KQED Science | May 22, 2013 | 0 Comments

Breast-Feeding Neanderthals Would Get Top Marks From Today’s Pediatricians

Like all mammals, the Neanderthals breast fed their babies. Scientists wanted to know: For how long? A team of researchers say they’ve answered that question by looking at the fossilized tooth of an eight-year old Neanderthal child discovered in a Belgian cave.

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2013/05/13/120681/teens_science_fair_project_new_diabetes_treatment?category=science target=_blank >Teen's Science Fair Project: New Diabetes Treatment?</a>

KQED News | May 13, 2013

Teen's Science Fair Project: New Diabetes Treatment?

Seven Bay Area students are in Phoenix this week for the world’s largest high school science competition. One sophomore from Walnut Creek was inspired by his grandfather’s Type 1 diabetes. Sixteen-year-old Rohan Savoor said he has always been interested in science, but this is the first time he’s been ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2013/04/29/air-pollution-lurks-inside-your-home/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=air-pollution-lurks-inside-your-home target=_blank >Air Pollution Lurks Inside Your Home</a>

QUEST | April 29, 2013

Air Pollution Lurks Inside Your Home

Photograph courtesy of kfisto via Creative Commons licensing. How would you like a job that involves shopping at the grocery store with the company credit card and cooking dishes like stir-fry? This describes Tosh Hotchi’s job, but he isn’t a chef. He is ...

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2013/04/25/119940/federal_budget_cuts_hit_lake_berryessa_area?category=science target=_blank >Federal Budget Cuts Hit Lake Berryessa Area</a>

KQED News | April 26, 2013

Federal Budget Cuts Hit Lake Berryessa Area

The battle over the federal budget in Washington, D.C., is taking a toll on rural communities around Lake Berryessa, a popular destination for boating and fishing northeast of Napa. Most of the lake's marinas and recreation sites have been shut down for years after a federal contractor failed in its ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2013/04/22/two-local-kids-are-semi-finalists-in-a-national-wildlife-art-contest/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=two-local-kids-are-semi-finalists-in-a-national-wildlife-art-contest target=_blank >Two Local Kids Are Semi-Finalists in a National Wildlife Art Contest</a>

QUEST | April 22, 2013

Two Local Kids Are Semi-Finalists in a National Wildlife Art Contest

Two Bay Area kids are semi-finalists in a national art contest celebrating endangered species. First-grader Hannah Chacko, of San Francisco, turned in this colorful drawing of the endangered San Francisco garter snake. (Perhaps a new t-shirt design for the city’s Sharp Park Golf Course?) Foster City’s Kevin Huo, an ...

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<a href=http://www.californiareport.org/archive/R201304191630/c target=_blank >Biotech Braces for Gene Patenting Ruling</a>

The California Report | April 19, 2013

Biotech Braces for Gene Patenting Ruling

California biotech companies had their eye on the U.S. Supreme Court this week as it heard arguments on a key question: can you patent a human gene? The court's ruling could mean millions of dollars to biotech companies and universities. ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2013/03/08/comets-may-have-delivered-lifes-early-building-blocks/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=comets-may-have-delivered-lifes-early-building-blocks target=_blank >Comets May Have Delivered Life's Early Building Blocks</a>

QUEST | March 8, 2013

Comets May Have Delivered Life's Early Building Blocks

NASA The building blocks of life on Earth may have originated in space. Chemists at the University of California, Berkeley and the University of Hawaii, Manoa have found the complex compounds essential for life can be forged in the vacuum of space. The linked pairs of ...

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