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Don’t Eat the Dirt on Mars: the Pros and Cons of Perchlorate

KQED Science | February 11, 2014 | 1 Comment

Don’t Eat the Dirt on Mars: the Pros and Cons of Perchlorate

To be successful Mars colonists, future astronauts will need to know both the potential hazard and utility of the soil. One unusual compound that has garnered quite a bit of attention is called perchlorate; it has the potential to be both a blessing and a curse for future explorers.

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DNA of 7000-Year-Old Spanish Skeleton Reveals Details About Appearance

KQED Science | February 10, 2014 | 2 Comments

DNA of 7000-Year-Old Spanish Skeleton Reveals Details About Appearance

Scientists have just done something that would have been unimaginable even a few years ago—they have sequenced the entire set of DNA from a 7000 year old Spaniard. And this isn’t all. They have also managed to learn that he was most likely a dark-skinned, blue or green-eyed man who had trouble digesting milk as an adult.

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Protecting the Snowy Plovers Wintering on Urban Beaches

KQED Science | January 31, 2014 | 1 Comment

Protecting the Snowy Plovers Wintering on Urban Beaches

A small flock of snowy plovers have moved to Crown Beach in Alameda this winter. Learn more about why they're threatened from Sharol Nelson-Embry of the East Bay Regional Park District.

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2014/01/30/elephants-and-tigers-beneath-our-feet-qa-with-soil-scientist-diana-wall/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=elephants-and-tigers-beneath-our-feet-qa-with-soil-scientist-diana-wall target=_blank >“Elephants and Tigers” Beneath Our Feet: Q&A with Soil Scientist Diana Wall</a>

QUEST | January 30, 2014

“Elephants and Tigers” Beneath Our Feet: Q&A with Soil Scientist Diana Wall

Find out how biodiversity below ground influences life above ground. ...Read More

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<a href=http://www.californiareport.org/archive/R201401290850/b target=_blank >Stem Cell Agency Puts $40 Million Up For Grabs in Genomic Research Grants</a>

The California Report | January 29, 2014

Stem Cell Agency Puts $40 Million Up For Grabs in Genomic Research Grants

The board of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine meets in Berkeley today. It's expected to vote to spend as much as $40 million dollars on genomic research, the study of genes and their relationships. Scientists from across California and beyond have been vying for this major investment, but a ...Read More

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2014/01/29/technologies-poised-to-keep-asian-carp-at-bay-slowed-by-challenges/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=technologies-poised-to-keep-asian-carp-at-bay-slowed-by-challenges target=_blank >Technologies Poised to Keep Asian Carp at Bay, Slowed by Challenges</a>

QUEST | January 29, 2014

Technologies Poised to Keep Asian Carp at Bay, Slowed by Challenges

In response to the major threats posed to the Great Lakes by invasive Asian carp, engineers have developed devices to keep them out, but delays in deciding how to implement them might give the fish an edge. ...Read More

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2014/01/19/132842/from_ashes_to_ashes_to_diamonds_a_way_to_treasure_the_dead?source=npr&category=science target=_blank >From Ashes To Ashes To Diamonds: A Way To Treasure The Dead</a>

KQED News | January 28, 2014

From Ashes To Ashes To Diamonds: A Way To Treasure The Dead

Turning your loved one's ashes into a diamond is one way to keep them close forever. ...Read More

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New DNA Study Reveals How Criminal Identical Twins Can Be Caught

KQED Science | January 27, 2014 | 0 Comments

New DNA Study Reveals How Criminal Identical Twins Can Be Caught

Six out of every thousand people are estimated to be identical twins. This means that there are a lot of children being fathered by identical twins and that these twins are involved in a good number of crimes too.  And until recently, none could be identified from just their DNA. This has all changed in a new study where scientists were able to reliably use DNA to tell two identical twins from each other.

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2014/01/22/132976/ancient_and_vulnerable_25_percent_of_sharks_and_rays_risk?source=npr&category=science target=_blank >Ancient and Vulnerable: 25 Percent of Sharks and Rays Risk Extinction</a>

KQED News | January 22, 2014

Ancient and Vulnerable: 25 Percent of Sharks and Rays Risk Extinction

There are more than a thousand species of sharks and rays in the world, and nearly a quarter of them are threatened with extinction. That means these ancient types of fish are among the most endangered animals in the world.

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New Imaging Method May Help Detect Heart Attack Risk in the Future

KQED Science | January 21, 2014 | 0 Comments

New Imaging Method May Help Detect Heart Attack Risk in the Future

A non-invasive imaging method could help identify and localize artery-clogging plaques that are likely to cause a heart attack. If future studies confirm the initial results, this technique has the potential to fundamentally alter the way we treat heart disease.

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The Mystery of the Missing Monarch Butterflies

KQED Science | January 17, 2014 | 4 Comments

The Mystery of the Missing Monarch Butterflies

Monarch butterfly populations are declining across North America and scientists are concerned. Why are Ardenwood Historic Farm's monarchs missing and where might they have gone?

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As Toxics Regulations Increase, Companies Simply Switch Chemicals

KQED Science | January 16, 2014 | 0 Comments

As Toxics Regulations Increase, Companies Simply Switch Chemicals

A UCSF researcher explains how public pressure on makeup manufacturers seems to work, and why it's "common sense" to keep plastic dishware out of the microwave.

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New Fukushima Radiation Study Will Focus on West Coast Kelp Forests

KQED Science | January 15, 2014 | 28 Comments

New Fukushima Radiation Study Will Focus on West Coast Kelp Forests

Researchers are launching a new project to monitor California's kelp forests for radiation from the Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan. Scientists will fan out along the California coast to collect kelp and find out if it has absorbed any radiation from the 2011 meltdown.

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Rethinking Normal: An Exploratorium Exhibit Takes on Mental Health

KQED Science | January 8, 2014 | 0 Comments

Rethinking Normal: An Exploratorium Exhibit Takes on Mental Health

As scientists struggle to find better ways to diagnose and treat mental disorders, an Exploratorium exhibition, "The Changing Face of What Is Normal," experiments with a new way to encourage people to think about what is normal.

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Stunning Fish Skeletons Serve Science and Art

KQED Science | January 7, 2014 | 0 Comments

Stunning Fish Skeletons Serve Science and Art

Cleared and stained skeletons are strikingly beautiful. But not many people outside the lab would ever know it—until now. "Cleared" is an exhibit of stained fish skeletons currently on display at the Seattle Aquarium, prepared and photographed by Adam P. Summers. Recently, Summers and his colleagues used a cleared and stained manta ray to discover how these curiously flat fish filter food out of the water.

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New Species Discovered by Bay Area Scientists

KQED Science | January 3, 2014 | 0 Comments

New Species Discovered by Bay Area Scientists

The work of finding and describing species new to science isn't just something Charles Darwin did. Scientists at Bay Area institutions have discovered ants in Madagascar, barnacles in the Gulf of Guinea and legless lizards here in California.

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Endangered Coho Salmon Return to Marin to Spawn

KQED Science | December 31, 2013 | 0 Comments

Endangered Coho Salmon Return to Marin to Spawn

Watching wild salmon swimming upstream isn’t just for for people with a television. This is the time of year for people in the San Francisco Bay Area to leave their couches and watch the endangered coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) spawn in Marin! There are three main viewing sites in Marin, although the Leo T. Cronin […]

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Our Ten Favorite Science Sounds of 2013

KQED Science | December 27, 2013 | 0 Comments

Our Ten Favorite Science Sounds of 2013

From whales and elephant seals to brain music and killer electrons, our best sounds of the year.

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Can Fear Be Passed Down Through Generations Within DNA?

KQED Science | December 23, 2013 | 0 Comments

Can Fear Be Passed Down Through Generations Within DNA?

Imagine a world where your experiences can be passed on to the next generation. Scientists don’t yet know if this happens in people, but they have now confirmed in a new study that this sort of thing does happen in mice.

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Busy Martinez Beavers Are Still Hard at Work in the Wintertime

KQED Science | December 20, 2013 | 3 Comments

Busy Martinez Beavers Are Still Hard at Work in the Wintertime

The city of Martinez turned its creek flooding problem into a downtown asset and gained some famous beavers in the process. Learn how beavers benefit the creek ecosystem and where you can see them at the Martinez Regional Shoreline.

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