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River Otters Are Thriving All Over the Bay Area

KQED Science | December 6, 2013 | 0 Comments

River Otters Are Thriving All Over the Bay Area

These charismatic critters draw a lot of attention and are thriving in local creeks, lakes and estuaries.The River Otter Ecology Project is working on the first-ever population assessment of these animals throughout the Bay Area.

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New DNA Studies Debunk Misconceptions About Paternal Relationships

KQED Science | November 25, 2013 | 1 Comment

New DNA Studies Debunk Misconceptions About Paternal Relationships

Some men are unknowingly raising kids that are not biologically related to them, but until recently, the numbers were uncertain. Now that DNA testing is becoming cheaper and easier, better data has become available.

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Celebrating the Legacy of Local Conservationist Elsie Roemer

KQED Science | November 22, 2013 | 0 Comments

Celebrating the Legacy of Local Conservationist Elsie Roemer

Learn about the legacy of former local conservationist Elsie Roemer and the marshland shorebirds sanctuary named in her honor in Alameda.

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Can California Burn its Way Out of its Wildfire Problem?

KQED Science | November 15, 2013 | 5 Comments

Can California Burn its Way Out of its Wildfire Problem?

People who fight and study fire generally agree that one of the best tools for preventing massive wildfires is prescribed burning: intentionally setting smaller fires before the big ones hit. But there are major challenges to fighting fire with fire.

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Crab Season Kicks Off With New Limits for Fishermen

KQED Science | November 13, 2013 | 0 Comments

Crab Season Kicks Off With New Limits for Fishermen

A new cap on the number of crab traps could help Bay Area fishermen--and maybe keep fresh crab in your local market a bit longer.

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Creepy Cat Eyes Inspire Road Markers (And Other Unexpectedly Interesting Inventions)

KQED Science | November 12, 2013 | 0 Comments

Creepy Cat Eyes Inspire Road Markers (And Other Unexpectedly Interesting Inventions)

Nature's inventiveness often inspires human innovation, as in the well-known case of Velcro. Learn about other inventions featured in "Hidden Heroes: The Genius of Everyday Things," an exhibit currently on display at the San Jose Museum of Art.

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Meditation May Ease PTSD in Combat Vets

KQED Science | November 8, 2013 | 0 Comments

Meditation May Ease PTSD in Combat Vets

The crisis of post-traumatic stress disorder -- both for newly returned vets and Vietnam vets who have lived with PTSD for decades -- is forcing the US military to explore some unorthodox treatments, including "compassion meditation."

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Kepler Team: Universe “Crowded” with Earth-Like Planets

KQED Science | November 4, 2013 | 0 Comments

Kepler Team: Universe “Crowded” with Earth-Like Planets

A NASA scientist sums it up: “If we ever get star travel, we’ll probably see a lot of traffic jams.”

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Poor Understanding of Genetics Can Lead to Separated Families

KQED Science | November 4, 2013 | 0 Comments

Poor Understanding of Genetics Can Lead to Separated Families

Parents can and do have children who look very different from themselves, but lack of understanding of genetics have led to authorities taking children away from them.

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ZomBees: Flight of the Living Dead

KQED Science | October 31, 2013 | 2 Comments

ZomBees: Flight of the Living Dead

Something strange and unsettling is happening to Bay Area honeybees. Entomologists at San Francisco State University have identified the culprit: a tiny parasitic fly is causing the bees to exhibit bizarre nocturnal behaviors before suffering a gruesome demise.

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Farming for Cranes: Can Agriculture Save an Ancient Migration?

KQED Science | October 30, 2013 | 0 Comments

Farming for Cranes: Can Agriculture Save an Ancient Migration?

Every September, the majestic sandhill crane migrates by the thousands from their breeding grounds as far north as British Columbia to the San Joaquin Valley Delta to fatten up for the next breeding season. Their long-term survival depends on innovative collaborations between conservation biologists and farmers to manage agricultural land as high-quality habitat.

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Controversial Genetic Engineering Technique Could Prevent Fatal Illnesses in Children

KQED Science | October 21, 2013 | 0 Comments

Controversial Genetic Engineering Technique Could Prevent Fatal Illnesses in Children

If scientists are allowed to perform a simple genetic engineering procedure, they will be able to offer a reprieve to a small group of women who are condemned to pass certain fatal genetic diseases to each and every one of their children.

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/audio/road-kill-or-road-crossing-california-slow-to-protect-wildlife/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=road-kill-or-road-crossing-california-slow-to-protect-wildlife target=_blank >Road Kill or Road Crossing: California Slow to Protect Wildlife</a>

QUEST | October 18, 2013

Road Kill or Road Crossing: California Slow to Protect Wildlife

Drivers hit thousands of animals every year on California freeways, often killing the wildlife, and sometimes killing or injuring the human, too. Several western states have built fencing and other infrastructure to help wildlife cross freeways safely, and critics say California could be doing a lot more of the same.

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Infections During Pregnancy May Increase Autism Risk

KQED Science | October 14, 2013 | 0 Comments

Infections During Pregnancy May Increase Autism Risk

Research at UC Davis identifies a new biological mechanism that links maternal infections during pregnancy to increased risk of having a child with a neurodevelopmental disorder like autism.

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Should Every Newborn Undergo Genetic Testing?

KQED Science | October 11, 2013 | 1 Comment

Should Every Newborn Undergo Genetic Testing?

The NIH has launched a five-year, $25 million dollar effort to explore what may be one of the great ethical dilemmas of the 21st century: Just because we can do genetic testing on infants, should we?

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To Protect Wildlife, California Bans Hunting With Lead Bullets

KQED Science | October 11, 2013 | 3 Comments

To Protect Wildlife, California Bans Hunting With Lead Bullets

Governor Jerry Brown has approved the first statewide lead bullet ban for hunters, in the hope of helping endangered California condors.

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California’s Tarantulas Are on the Move During Mating Season

KQED Science | October 11, 2013 | 0 Comments

California’s Tarantulas Are on the Move During Mating Season

Male California tarantulas are now roaming through the Bay Area looking for love. Find out more about where you can see them, what they're doing and what dangers they face from naturalist Sharol Nelson-Embry.

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Your Car Could Run On Gasoline Made From Bacteria in the Future

KQED Science | October 7, 2013 | 0 Comments

Your Car Could Run On Gasoline Made From Bacteria in the Future

Imagine if instead of digging oil up out of the ground and refining it into gasoline, we could just have bacteria make it for us in a big vat somewhere. Researchers from South Korea have done just that -- engineered bacteria to make gasoline -- but many challenges remain before large scale production becomes viable.

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Watsonville Lacks Funds to Control Toxic Algae, Threatening Wildlife

KQED Science | October 4, 2013 | 0 Comments

Watsonville Lacks Funds to Control Toxic Algae, Threatening Wildlife

The city of Watsonville has an expensive problem on its hands: toxic algae stirred up from the bottom of Pinto Lake makes the lake poisonous to humans and deadly to birds, fish, and even the otters in Monterey Bay, where the lake water eventually empties into the sea. Knowing how to clean it is one thing; paying for it is another.

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A Squid’s Switchable Cells Offer Key to Camouflage

KQED Science | October 1, 2013 | 0 Comments

A Squid’s Switchable Cells Offer Key to Camouflage

New research shows that market squid may have something to offer the engineering sector: skin cells that can switch between transparent and white. Humans could use these cells to develop new bio-inspired materials; squid probably use them for cross-dressing.

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