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With Humpback Whales’ Baby Boom, Scientists May Revoke Endangered Species Status

KQED Science | March 14, 2014 | 0 Comments

With Humpback Whales’ Baby Boom, Scientists May Revoke Endangered Species Status

Humpbacks in the North Pacific have five new populations determined by genetics and breeding locations. They may also be removed from the Endangered Species list since their overall population has rebounded.

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2014/03/11/134714/trapping_and_tracking_the_mysterious_snowy_owl?source=npr&category=science target=_blank >Trapping And Tracking The Mysterious Snowy Owl</a>

KQED News | March 11, 2014

Trapping And Tracking The Mysterious Snowy Owl

This winter's Arctic bird invasion has given owl researchers the opportunity of a lifetime. ...Read More

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Erasing Traumatic Memories from DNA May One Day Help PTSD Sufferers

KQED Science | March 10, 2014 | 1 Comment

Erasing Traumatic Memories from DNA May One Day Help PTSD Sufferers

A group of scientists has reported that they have been able to make current treatments for post-traumatic stress syndrome (PTSD) better and longer lasting in mice. The hope is that these findings may one day pave the way for better treatments for the 7-8% of people who suffer from PTSD at some point in their lives.

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What We Know — And Don’t Know — About the Sea Star Die-Off

KQED Science | March 7, 2014 | 1 Comment

What We Know — And Don’t Know — About the Sea Star Die-Off

Starfish on the West Coast have been dying in startling numbers. Some observers have documented sea star bodies turning to mush, others described the creatures disintegrating. It's "sea star wasting disease," and scientists don't know what causes it.

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New UCSF Lab Studies How Video Games Affect Our Brains

KQED Science | March 6, 2014 | 0 Comments

New UCSF Lab Studies How Video Games Affect Our Brains

Video games do one thing very well: train people to become better gamers. But whether those results transfer outside the game into the real world is a source of lively debate among neuroscientists.

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Predatory Plant: Lure of the Cobra Lily

KQED Science | March 3, 2014 | 0 Comments

Predatory Plant: Lure of the Cobra Lily

What lurks inside a hungry pitcher plant? The cobra lily, a carnivorous plant native to California, uses deception, patience and bacteria to catch and digest its prey. Watch it in action.

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Is Brain Stimulation a Medicine of the Future?

KQED Science | March 3, 2014 | 0 Comments

Is Brain Stimulation a Medicine of the Future?

While scientists study whether "electroceuticals" might treat depression or chronic pain, among other ailments, DIY "brain hackers" (including this reporter) are trying it out on themselves.

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New Research Shows Diet Drinks May Backfire for Weight Loss

KQED Science | February 24, 2014 | 0 Comments

New Research Shows Diet Drinks May Backfire for Weight Loss

Many overweight people switch to diet drinks to reduce their calorie intake. Unfortunately, they make up the calories by eating significantly more food during meals and snacks.

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New Technology Allows for Precise Genetic Engineering in Primates

KQED Science | February 24, 2014 | 2 Comments

New Technology Allows for Precise Genetic Engineering in Primates

Scientists can now make precise, specific changes in the DNA of primates using a new technology first identified in bacteria. Not only will this usher in an age where animal models for human diseases are more useful, but it also means that we are very close to being able to do the same thing in people.

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Seven Things to Know About the Sixth Mass Extinction

KQED Science | February 21, 2014 | 3 Comments

Seven Things to Know About the Sixth Mass Extinction

Elizabeth Kolbert’s book “The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History” centers around two premises: that humans are witnessing a very high rate of species extinction and that humans are causing much of it.

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Love’s For the Birds: Global Great Backyard Bird Count Begins Today

KQED Science | February 14, 2014 | 0 Comments

Love’s For the Birds: Global Great Backyard Bird Count Begins Today

Citizen scientists are helping to track bird species right in their own backyards. Sharol Nelson-Embry of the East Bay Regional Parks District explains how to get in on the largest global bird count this weekend.

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Love is in the Air…And it Smells like Striped Skunks

KQED Science | February 13, 2014 | 0 Comments

Love is in the Air…And it Smells like Striped Skunks

Most people associate February with the scent of roses, but there is another scent that seems to be everywhere this time of year, too. Striped skunks around the Bay Area are on edge due to breeding season, using their foul-smelling spray to communicate to each other and protect themselves as they wander looking for mates.

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Drought Leads to Tough Tradeoffs for California Salmon

KQED Science | February 12, 2014 | 1 Comment

Drought Leads to Tough Tradeoffs for California Salmon

State officials are trying to do damage control to help endangered salmon during the drought, but helping some fish could hurt others.

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Record Drought Could Hurt Water Quality

KQED Science | February 11, 2014 | 1 Comment

Record Drought Could Hurt Water Quality

With low water levels in rivers, water quality could suffer, creating toxic algae blooms and causing concerns for water districts.

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Don’t Eat the Dirt on Mars: the Pros and Cons of Perchlorate

KQED Science | February 11, 2014 | 1 Comment

Don’t Eat the Dirt on Mars: the Pros and Cons of Perchlorate

To be successful Mars colonists, future astronauts will need to know both the potential hazard and utility of the soil. One unusual compound that has garnered quite a bit of attention is called perchlorate; it has the potential to be both a blessing and a curse for future explorers.

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DNA of 7000-Year-Old Spanish Skeleton Reveals Details About Appearance

KQED Science | February 10, 2014 | 2 Comments

DNA of 7000-Year-Old Spanish Skeleton Reveals Details About Appearance

Scientists have just done something that would have been unimaginable even a few years ago—they have sequenced the entire set of DNA from a 7000 year old Spaniard. And this isn’t all. They have also managed to learn that he was most likely a dark-skinned, blue or green-eyed man who had trouble digesting milk as an adult.

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Protecting the Snowy Plovers Wintering on Urban Beaches

KQED Science | January 31, 2014 | 1 Comment

Protecting the Snowy Plovers Wintering on Urban Beaches

A small flock of snowy plovers have moved to Crown Beach in Alameda this winter. Learn more about why they're threatened from Sharol Nelson-Embry of the East Bay Regional Park District.

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2014/01/30/elephants-and-tigers-beneath-our-feet-qa-with-soil-scientist-diana-wall/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=elephants-and-tigers-beneath-our-feet-qa-with-soil-scientist-diana-wall target=_blank >“Elephants and Tigers” Beneath Our Feet: Q&A with Soil Scientist Diana Wall</a>

QUEST | January 30, 2014

“Elephants and Tigers” Beneath Our Feet: Q&A with Soil Scientist Diana Wall

Find out how biodiversity below ground influences life above ground. ...Read More

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<a href=http://www.californiareport.org/archive/R201401290850/b target=_blank >Stem Cell Agency Puts $40 Million Up For Grabs in Genomic Research Grants</a>

The California Report | January 29, 2014

Stem Cell Agency Puts $40 Million Up For Grabs in Genomic Research Grants

The board of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine meets in Berkeley today. It's expected to vote to spend as much as $40 million dollars on genomic research, the study of genes and their relationships. Scientists from across California and beyond have been vying for this major investment, but a ...Read More

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2014/01/29/technologies-poised-to-keep-asian-carp-at-bay-slowed-by-challenges/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=technologies-poised-to-keep-asian-carp-at-bay-slowed-by-challenges target=_blank >Technologies Poised to Keep Asian Carp at Bay, Slowed by Challenges</a>

QUEST | January 29, 2014

Technologies Poised to Keep Asian Carp at Bay, Slowed by Challenges

In response to the major threats posed to the Great Lakes by invasive Asian carp, engineers have developed devices to keep them out, but delays in deciding how to implement them might give the fish an edge. ...Read More

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