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New Fukushima Radiation Study Will Focus on West Coast Kelp Forests

KQED Science | January 15, 2014 | 28 Comments

New Fukushima Radiation Study Will Focus on West Coast Kelp Forests

Researchers are launching a new project to monitor California's kelp forests for radiation from the Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan. Scientists will fan out along the California coast to collect kelp and find out if it has absorbed any radiation from the 2011 meltdown.

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Rethinking Normal: An Exploratorium Exhibit Takes on Mental Health

KQED Science | January 8, 2014 | 0 Comments

Rethinking Normal: An Exploratorium Exhibit Takes on Mental Health

As scientists struggle to find better ways to diagnose and treat mental disorders, an Exploratorium exhibition, "The Changing Face of What Is Normal," experiments with a new way to encourage people to think about what is normal.

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Stunning Fish Skeletons Serve Science and Art

KQED Science | January 7, 2014 | 0 Comments

Stunning Fish Skeletons Serve Science and Art

Cleared and stained skeletons are strikingly beautiful. But not many people outside the lab would ever know it—until now. "Cleared" is an exhibit of stained fish skeletons currently on display at the Seattle Aquarium, prepared and photographed by Adam P. Summers. Recently, Summers and his colleagues used a cleared and stained manta ray to discover how these curiously flat fish filter food out of the water.

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New Species Discovered by Bay Area Scientists

KQED Science | January 3, 2014 | 0 Comments

New Species Discovered by Bay Area Scientists

The work of finding and describing species new to science isn't just something Charles Darwin did. Scientists at Bay Area institutions have discovered ants in Madagascar, barnacles in the Gulf of Guinea and legless lizards here in California.

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Endangered Coho Salmon Return to Marin to Spawn

KQED Science | December 31, 2013 | 0 Comments

Endangered Coho Salmon Return to Marin to Spawn

Watching wild salmon swimming upstream isn’t just for for people with a television. This is the time of year for people in the San Francisco Bay Area to leave their couches and watch the endangered coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) spawn in Marin! There are three main viewing sites in Marin, although the Leo T. Cronin […]

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Our Ten Favorite Science Sounds of 2013

KQED Science | December 27, 2013 | 0 Comments

Our Ten Favorite Science Sounds of 2013

From whales and elephant seals to brain music and killer electrons, our best sounds of the year.

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Can Fear Be Passed Down Through Generations Within DNA?

KQED Science | December 23, 2013 | 0 Comments

Can Fear Be Passed Down Through Generations Within DNA?

Imagine a world where your experiences can be passed on to the next generation. Scientists don’t yet know if this happens in people, but they have now confirmed in a new study that this sort of thing does happen in mice.

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Busy Martinez Beavers Are Still Hard at Work in the Wintertime

KQED Science | December 20, 2013 | 3 Comments

Busy Martinez Beavers Are Still Hard at Work in the Wintertime

The city of Martinez turned its creek flooding problem into a downtown asset and gained some famous beavers in the process. Learn how beavers benefit the creek ecosystem and where you can see them at the Martinez Regional Shoreline.

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Geological BFF’s: Mud Microbes Require Rare Earth Metals to Thrive

KQED Science | December 19, 2013 | 0 Comments

Geological BFF’s: Mud Microbes Require Rare Earth Metals to Thrive

The obscure rare-earth metals turn out to be unexpectedly essential to life in hot volcanic mud--and probably elsewhere.

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Click to “Like” My Genome: Part Two

KQED Science | December 17, 2013 | 1 Comment

Click to “Like” My Genome: Part Two

The FDA challenge may hurt the personal genetics industry in the short run. No traits, no health risks -- no fun. But the company is still allowed to show ancestry results. 23andMe's map of my distant relations offered a glimpse of the movement of people across the world. The more people who joined and shared their genomes, the more comprehensive a picture we could form of a global family tree. A day might come when I would know precisely how related I was to, for example -- you.

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Consumer Genetic Testing Company 23andMe Faces Its Own Test From the FDA

KQED Science | December 9, 2013 | 1 Comment

Consumer Genetic Testing Company 23andMe Faces Its Own Test From the FDA

In response to a letter from the FDA, a direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing company in Mountain View, California called 23andMe has agreed to stop providing health data on new purchases of its $99 genetic tests.

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River Otters Are Thriving All Over the Bay Area

KQED Science | December 6, 2013 | 0 Comments

River Otters Are Thriving All Over the Bay Area

These charismatic critters draw a lot of attention and are thriving in local creeks, lakes and estuaries.The River Otter Ecology Project is working on the first-ever population assessment of these animals throughout the Bay Area.

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New DNA Studies Debunk Misconceptions About Paternal Relationships

KQED Science | November 25, 2013 | 1 Comment

New DNA Studies Debunk Misconceptions About Paternal Relationships

Some men are unknowingly raising kids that are not biologically related to them, but until recently, the numbers were uncertain. Now that DNA testing is becoming cheaper and easier, better data has become available.

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Celebrating the Legacy of Local Conservationist Elsie Roemer

KQED Science | November 22, 2013 | 0 Comments

Celebrating the Legacy of Local Conservationist Elsie Roemer

Learn about the legacy of former local conservationist Elsie Roemer and the marshland shorebirds sanctuary named in her honor in Alameda.

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Can California Burn its Way Out of its Wildfire Problem?

KQED Science | November 15, 2013 | 3 Comments

Can California Burn its Way Out of its Wildfire Problem?

People who fight and study fire generally agree that one of the best tools for preventing massive wildfires is prescribed burning: intentionally setting smaller fires before the big ones hit. But there are major challenges to fighting fire with fire.

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Crab Season Kicks Off With New Limits for Fishermen

KQED Science | November 13, 2013 | 0 Comments

Crab Season Kicks Off With New Limits for Fishermen

A new cap on the number of crab traps could help Bay Area fishermen--and maybe keep fresh crab in your local market a bit longer.

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Creepy Cat Eyes Inspire Road Markers (And Other Unexpectedly Interesting Inventions)

KQED Science | November 12, 2013 | 0 Comments

Creepy Cat Eyes Inspire Road Markers (And Other Unexpectedly Interesting Inventions)

Nature's inventiveness often inspires human innovation, as in the well-known case of Velcro. Learn about other inventions featured in "Hidden Heroes: The Genius of Everyday Things," an exhibit currently on display at the San Jose Museum of Art.

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Meditation May Ease PTSD in Combat Vets

KQED Science | November 8, 2013 | 0 Comments

Meditation May Ease PTSD in Combat Vets

The crisis of post-traumatic stress disorder -- both for newly returned vets and Vietnam vets who have lived with PTSD for decades -- is forcing the US military to explore some unorthodox treatments, including "compassion meditation."

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Kepler Team: Universe “Crowded” with Earth-Like Planets

KQED Science | November 4, 2013 | 0 Comments

Kepler Team: Universe “Crowded” with Earth-Like Planets

A NASA scientist sums it up: “If we ever get star travel, we’ll probably see a lot of traffic jams.”

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Poor Understanding of Genetics Can Lead to Separated Families

KQED Science | November 4, 2013 | 0 Comments

Poor Understanding of Genetics Can Lead to Separated Families

Parents can and do have children who look very different from themselves, but lack of understanding of genetics have led to authorities taking children away from them.

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