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For San Francisco Bone Collector, Skulls Are a Lifelong Love Affair

KQED Science | May 12, 2014 | 1 Comment

For San Francisco Bone Collector, Skulls Are a Lifelong Love Affair

San Francisco's California Academy of Sciences opens a skull exhibit this week, featuring the work of Ray Bandar, a man who has devoted 60 years to cleaning the skulls and bones of some of California's most beloved animals.

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Local and Migratory Birds Mingle in the Bay Area During Spring

KQED Science | May 9, 2014 | 0 Comments

Local and Migratory Birds Mingle in the Bay Area During Spring

The beginning of May is a wonderful time to go bird watching in the Bay Area, with lingering winter birds, neotropical migrants and local species all in the same region for a brief time.

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Surprising Amount of Neanderthal DNA Still Evident in Modern European and Asian Populations

KQED Science | May 5, 2014 | 9 Comments

Surprising Amount of Neanderthal DNA Still Evident in Modern European and Asian Populations

Neanderthals may be extinct but at least 20-40% of their DNA lives on in modern Europeans and Asians because of interbreeding. Neanderthal DNA survives because it gave useful traits to the ancestors of Europeans and Asians.

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Consumer Gene Tests Face Uncertain Future

KQED Science | May 5, 2014 | 1 Comment

Consumer Gene Tests Face Uncertain Future

Personal genetics companies that offer health insights are working to satisfy federal regulators and keep up with changing science.

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Hikers Use Smartphones to Capture Fire Recovery on Mt. Diablo

KQED Science | April 24, 2014 | 1 Comment

Hikers Use Smartphones to Capture Fire Recovery on Mt. Diablo

A citizen science group is asking hikers to use their smartphones help study how Mt. Diablo State Park is recovering from last year's Morgan Fire.

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Scientists Have Engineered a Version of Bird Flu That Can Spread Between Mammals

KQED Science | April 21, 2014 | 0 Comments

Scientists Have Engineered a Version of Bird Flu That Can Spread Between Mammals

Scientists were able to engineer a version of the bird flu that can spread between mammals, the first step towards turning this virus into a pandemic. This research is controversial as it has created something that is potentially dangerous.

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De-Extinction: Bay Area Researcher Hopes to Bring Back the Passenger Pigeon

KQED Science | April 18, 2014 | 0 Comments

De-Extinction: Bay Area Researcher Hopes to Bring Back the Passenger Pigeon

Researchers are working to revive the passenger pigeon, once the most abundant bird in the world, and the woolly mammoth, which they say could slow down the melting of Arctic permafrost. It may be possible, but is it right to turn back the clock?

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Biologists’ Paradox: Killing and Collecting Rare Creatures to Prove They’re Not Extinct

KQED Science | April 17, 2014 | 2 Comments

Biologists’ Paradox: Killing and Collecting Rare Creatures to Prove They’re Not Extinct

A group of biologists asks their peers to start documenting newly discovered and "rediscovered" species by non-destructive techniques instead of killing a specimen to bring home.

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Health Trackers May Be the Rage, But How Useful Are They?

KQED Science | April 15, 2014 | 2 Comments

Health Trackers May Be the Rage, But How Useful Are They?

Low battery life, bulky appearance and lack of integration are some of the obstacles in the way before health trackers become the next gadgets we can’t live without.

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World’s Largest “Tentacles” Exhibit at Monterey Bay Aquarium Will Cultivate Its Own Cephalopods

KQED Science | April 8, 2014 | 2 Comments

World’s Largest “Tentacles” Exhibit at Monterey Bay Aquarium Will Cultivate Its Own Cephalopods

The Monterey Bay Aquarium's new exhibit will be the world’s largest, most diverse display of octopuses, squid and cuttlefish. To pull it off, aquarists are coaxing reproduction from the most reluctant critters.

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Another Step Closer to Redesigning Life: Scientists Create Synthetic Chromosome in Yeast

KQED Science | April 7, 2014 | 0 Comments

Another Step Closer to Redesigning Life: Scientists Create Synthetic Chromosome in Yeast

A group of scientists has replaced a natural chromosome in yeast with an artificial one. This won't only make a more useful yeast, but it also opens the door to redesigning the DNA of more complicated beasts like plants and animals (or us) and maybe even to resurrecting extinct species like the passenger pigeon or wooly mammoth.

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Yosemite Opens Areas Closed After Last Summer’s Huge Rim Fire

KQED Science | April 2, 2014 | 0 Comments

Yosemite Opens Areas Closed After Last Summer’s Huge Rim Fire

The fire burned more than a quarter of a million acres in Yosemite and the Stanislaus National Forest. See before-and-after photos from a plot in the national forest.

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Surprising New Research on Gray Whales Reveals Their Complex Relationships

KQED Science | March 28, 2014 | 3 Comments

Surprising New Research on Gray Whales Reveals Their Complex Relationships

Scientists continue to learn more about the complex relationships between Eastern and Western Pacific stocks of gray whales and fight to save the Western population as it teeters on the brink of extinction. Learn about the surprising discovery they have made using DNA and satellite tracking with naturalist Sharol Nelson-Embry.

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BioBlitz: A 24-Hour Quest to Count Plants and Animals in the Golden Gate National Parks

KQED Science | March 27, 2014 | 0 Comments

BioBlitz: A 24-Hour Quest to Count Plants and Animals in the Golden Gate National Parks

Scientists, students and volunteers are descending on the Golden Gate National Recreation Area this Friday and Saturday to record as many plant and animal species as possible in 24 hours. It's part of an event called a BioBlitz.

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Woolly Mammoth Fossils Raise Red Flags on the Road to Extinction

KQED Science | March 25, 2014 | 0 Comments

Woolly Mammoth Fossils Raise Red Flags on the Road to Extinction

A surprising discovery in woolly mammoth fossils recovered from the North Sea off the coast of the Netherlands suggests that inbreeding and harsh conditions plagued the ice age giants near the end of their reign on Earth.

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Testing Complete DNA Sequences Yields Only Partial Info but Could Still Save Your Life

KQED Science | March 24, 2014 | 0 Comments

Testing Complete DNA Sequences Yields Only Partial Info but Could Still Save Your Life

Evaluating your whole genome sequence to determine your health risks is not yet up to snuff. But as imperfect as it is, you still might see something that could save your life.

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NASA Sends Fruit Flies to Space to Prep for Mars Missions

KQED Science | March 24, 2014 | 0 Comments

NASA Sends Fruit Flies to Space to Prep for Mars Missions

Getting sick in space is no picnic. So scientists are sending bugs to the International Space Station, hoping to better predict some of the physical challenges that may befall astronauts when NASA eventually sends the first human mission to Mars.

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Epilepsy Research Aided by Sea Lions With Seizures

KQED Science | March 20, 2014 | 0 Comments

Epilepsy Research Aided by Sea Lions With Seizures

Some sea lions suffer from a form of epilepsy that bears a striking resemblance to epilepsy in humans. That insight could help scientists develop treatments and eventually find a cure for temporal lobe epilepsy, one of the most common forms that people get.

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Debate Heats Up Over Proposal to Ban Orcas in Captivity

KQED Science | March 17, 2014 | 12 Comments

Debate Heats Up Over Proposal to Ban Orcas in Captivity

State Assemblyman Richard Bloom is determined to end the use of orcas for water shows in California, where the whales jump through hoops, for example, or carry trainers on their backs.

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How Damaged is Your DNA? A New Startup Wants to Know

KQED Science | March 17, 2014 | 3 Comments

How Damaged is Your DNA? A New Startup Wants to Know

If your annual checkup included a simple blood test to determine how much DNA damage you have in your body, you may be able to optimize your long-term health by taking action to minimize DNA damage due to your diet, exercise and environment. A startup company called Exogen Biotechnology wants to provide the public with a way to monitor their DNA health.

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