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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2014/06/04/138387/an_underwater_race_to_transplant_miamis_rare_corals?source=npr&category=science target=_blank >An Underwater Race To Transplant Miami's Rare Corals</a>

KQED News | June 4, 2014

An Underwater Race To Transplant Miami's Rare Corals

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California to Protect Gray Wolves as Endangered Species

KQED Science | June 4, 2014 | 0 Comments

California to Protect Gray Wolves as Endangered Species

Though there are no wild wolves in California, state officials, expecting them to get here eventually, voted to protect them.

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Brown Pelican Population Plunges in California

KQED Science | June 4, 2014 | 0 Comments

Brown Pelican Population Plunges in California

California brown pelicans, which were driven to the brink of extinction in the last century, are in trouble again. The reason for the decline could range from food supply shifts to changes in water temperature.

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Comb Jelly DNA Studies Are Changing How Scientists Think Animals Evolved

KQED Science | June 2, 2014 | 5 Comments

Comb Jelly DNA Studies Are Changing How Scientists Think Animals Evolved

Comb jellies are these beautiful, otherworldly creatures that sparkle gently in the sea. And now, if a study in the journal Science and another one in the journal Nature hold up, they may not be so gentle on evolution or the tree of life. These “aliens of the sea” are fundamentally changing how we think about both.

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2014/05/29/138241/scientists_find_africas_longest_migration_zebras_350mile_trek?source=npr&category=science target=_blank >Scientists Find Africa's Longest Migration: Zebras' 350-Mile Trek</a>

KQED News | May 29, 2014

Scientists Find Africa's Longest Migration: Zebras' 350-Mile Trek

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2014/05/27/138177/hybrid_trout_threaten_montanas_native_cutthroats?source=npr&category=science target=_blank >Hybrid Trout Threaten Montana's Native Cutthroats</a>

KQED News | May 27, 2014

Hybrid Trout Threaten Montana's Native Cutthroats

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2014/05/27/sweet-and-deadly-bat-borne-virus-brews-in-bangladeshs-date-palm-pots/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=sweet-and-deadly-bat-borne-virus-brews-in-bangladeshs-date-palm-pots target=_blank >Sweet and Deadly: Bat-Borne Virus Brews in Bangladesh’s Date Palm Pots</a>

QUEST | May 27, 2014

Sweet and Deadly: Bat-Borne Virus Brews in Bangladesh’s Date Palm Pots

Deforestation and increased interactions between humans and wildlife are implicated in the spread of the Nipah virus. ...Read More

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DNA 2.0: Adding Two Letters to Life’s Alphabet

KQED Science | May 19, 2014 | 0 Comments

DNA 2.0: Adding Two Letters to Life’s Alphabet

For the last few billion years, all life has used just four letters to spell out its instructions. Now a group in San Diego has added two new letters.

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For San Francisco Bone Collector, Skulls Are a Lifelong Love Affair

KQED Science | May 12, 2014 | 1 Comment

For San Francisco Bone Collector, Skulls Are a Lifelong Love Affair

San Francisco's California Academy of Sciences opens a skull exhibit this week, featuring the work of Ray Bandar, a man who has devoted 60 years to cleaning the skulls and bones of some of California's most beloved animals.

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Local and Migratory Birds Mingle in the Bay Area During Spring

KQED Science | May 9, 2014 | 0 Comments

Local and Migratory Birds Mingle in the Bay Area During Spring

The beginning of May is a wonderful time to go bird watching in the Bay Area, with lingering winter birds, neotropical migrants and local species all in the same region for a brief time.

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Surprising Amount of Neanderthal DNA Still Evident in Modern European and Asian Populations

KQED Science | May 5, 2014 | 11 Comments

Surprising Amount of Neanderthal DNA Still Evident in Modern European and Asian Populations

Neanderthals may be extinct but at least 20-40% of their DNA lives on in modern Europeans and Asians because of interbreeding. Neanderthal DNA survives because it gave useful traits to the ancestors of Europeans and Asians.

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Consumer Gene Tests Face Uncertain Future

KQED Science | May 5, 2014 | 1 Comment

Consumer Gene Tests Face Uncertain Future

Personal genetics companies that offer health insights are working to satisfy federal regulators and keep up with changing science.

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Hikers Use Smartphones to Capture Fire Recovery on Mt. Diablo

KQED Science | April 24, 2014 | 1 Comment

Hikers Use Smartphones to Capture Fire Recovery on Mt. Diablo

A citizen science group is asking hikers to use their smartphones help study how Mt. Diablo State Park is recovering from last year's Morgan Fire.

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Scientists Have Engineered a Version of Bird Flu That Can Spread Between Mammals

KQED Science | April 21, 2014 | 0 Comments

Scientists Have Engineered a Version of Bird Flu That Can Spread Between Mammals

Scientists were able to engineer a version of the bird flu that can spread between mammals, the first step towards turning this virus into a pandemic. This research is controversial as it has created something that is potentially dangerous.

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De-Extinction: Bay Area Researcher Hopes to Bring Back the Passenger Pigeon

KQED Science | April 18, 2014 | 0 Comments

De-Extinction: Bay Area Researcher Hopes to Bring Back the Passenger Pigeon

Researchers are working to revive the passenger pigeon, once the most abundant bird in the world, and the woolly mammoth, which they say could slow down the melting of Arctic permafrost. It may be possible, but is it right to turn back the clock?

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Biologists’ Paradox: Killing and Collecting Rare Creatures to Prove They’re Not Extinct

KQED Science | April 17, 2014 | 2 Comments

Biologists’ Paradox: Killing and Collecting Rare Creatures to Prove They’re Not Extinct

A group of biologists asks their peers to start documenting newly discovered and "rediscovered" species by non-destructive techniques instead of killing a specimen to bring home.

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Health Trackers May Be the Rage, But How Useful Are They?

KQED Science | April 15, 2014 | 2 Comments

Health Trackers May Be the Rage, But How Useful Are They?

Low battery life, bulky appearance and lack of integration are some of the obstacles in the way before health trackers become the next gadgets we can’t live without.

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World’s Largest “Tentacles” Exhibit at Monterey Bay Aquarium Will Cultivate Its Own Cephalopods

KQED Science | April 8, 2014 | 2 Comments

World’s Largest “Tentacles” Exhibit at Monterey Bay Aquarium Will Cultivate Its Own Cephalopods

The Monterey Bay Aquarium's new exhibit will be the world’s largest, most diverse display of octopuses, squid and cuttlefish. To pull it off, aquarists are coaxing reproduction from the most reluctant critters.

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Another Step Closer to Redesigning Life: Scientists Create Synthetic Chromosome in Yeast

KQED Science | April 7, 2014 | 0 Comments

Another Step Closer to Redesigning Life: Scientists Create Synthetic Chromosome in Yeast

A group of scientists has replaced a natural chromosome in yeast with an artificial one. This won't only make a more useful yeast, but it also opens the door to redesigning the DNA of more complicated beasts like plants and animals (or us) and maybe even to resurrecting extinct species like the passenger pigeon or wooly mammoth.

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Yosemite Opens Areas Closed After Last Summer’s Huge Rim Fire

KQED Science | April 2, 2014 | 0 Comments

Yosemite Opens Areas Closed After Last Summer’s Huge Rim Fire

The fire burned more than a quarter of a million acres in Yosemite and the Stanislaus National Forest. See before-and-after photos from a plot in the national forest.

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