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Bay Area Scientists Artfully Present Their Research in Oakland Exhibit

KQED Science | October 20, 2014 | 1 Comment

Bay Area Scientists Artfully Present Their Research in Oakland Exhibit

“Experimental Space” is the latest show at Oakland art gallery Aggregate Space, consisting of images and videos created by scientists in the course of their research.

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2014/10/06/144845/3_neuroscientists_to_share_nobel_prize_in_physiology_or_medicine?source=npr&category=science target=_blank >3 Neuroscientists To Share Nobel Prize In Physiology Or Medicine</a>

KQED News | October 6, 2014

3 Neuroscientists To Share Nobel Prize In Physiology Or Medicine

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. ...Read More

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Restoring the Serpentine Prairie Habitat in Oakland

KQED Science | September 26, 2014 | 0 Comments

Restoring the Serpentine Prairie Habitat in Oakland

A highly endangered species exists on the urban edge of Redwood Regional Park in Oakland. Find out what volunteers and the East Bay Regional Park District are doing to protect and restore the serpentine prairie.

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Genetic Tests May Have Unexpected Side Effects — Like Divorce

KQED Science | September 22, 2014 | 2 Comments

Genetic Tests May Have Unexpected Side Effects — Like Divorce

Direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic tests are a fun way to learn about your family history, ancestry and maybe even a bit about your future health risks. But sometimes, they can also lead to unforeseen negative consequences.

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2014/09/10/142891/us_gets_middling_marks_on_2014_state_of_birds_report_card?source=npr&category=science target=_blank >U.S. Gets Middling Marks On 2014 'State Of Birds' Report Card</a>

KQED News | September 10, 2014

U.S. Gets Middling Marks On 2014 'State Of Birds' Report Card

All is not well with the nation's birds. The most comprehensive study ever of birds in America is out today, and it says many populations are in steep decline, even as others are doing well. The report, called "The State of the Birds," comes from the federal government, universities and ...Read More

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2014/09/09/142788/more_than_half_of_us_bird_species_threatened_by_climate_change?source=npr&category=science target=_blank >More Than Half of U.S. Bird Species Threatened by Climate Change</a>

KQED News | September 9, 2014

More Than Half of U.S. Bird Species Threatened by Climate Change

People in Maryland love their Baltimore orioles — so much so that their major league baseball team bears the name of the migrating bird. Yet, by 2080, there may not be any orioles left in Maryland. They migrate each year and, according to a new report, could soon be forced ...Read More

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Fixing a Gene in a Fertilized Egg Prevents Muscular Dystrophy (in a Mouse)

KQED Science | September 8, 2014 | 0 Comments

Fixing a Gene in a Fertilized Egg Prevents Muscular Dystrophy (in a Mouse)

Scientists recently fixed a broken gene in a fertilized mouse egg and prevented the mouse from getting an ultimately fatal form of muscular dystrophy. This study may one day translate into gene therapies that will treat and maybe even reverse certain effects of the disease.

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West Coast Fish Upgraded to Sustainable Seafood Choice

KQED Science | September 3, 2014 | 0 Comments

West Coast Fish Upgraded to Sustainable Seafood Choice

One of the key fisheries on the West Coast is coming back after years of decline.

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Pretty but Prickly: the Defenses of California Plants

KQED Science | September 3, 2014 | 0 Comments

Pretty but Prickly: the Defenses of California Plants

Discover the beauty of sharpness and learn how to tell the difference between thorns, spines, and prickles.

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The First Annual World Shorebirds Day Kicks off on September 6

KQED Science | August 29, 2014 | 0 Comments

The First Annual World Shorebirds Day Kicks off on September 6

Shorebird populations worldwide are declining, and endangered birds like the spoonbill sandpiper are facing extinction in the next five years. Learn about shorebirds who migrate to San Francisco Bay during winter months and how you can join the first annual "World Shorebirds Day" celebration.

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A Glimpse of LUCA, Life’s Last Universal Common Ancestor

KQED Science | August 25, 2014 | 0 Comments

A Glimpse of LUCA, Life’s Last Universal Common Ancestor

A new study suggests how early life might have survived without some of the cellular machinery that is absolutely required for life today. Turns out that having a fairly leaky membrane may have been the key.

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San Francisco Wants to Know: Is Your Living Room Window Killing Migratory Birds?

KQED Science | August 22, 2014 | 0 Comments

San Francisco Wants to Know: Is Your Living Room Window Killing Migratory Birds?

Between 100 million and one billion birds die each year from colliding with glass windows of commercial or residential buildings. San Francisco is launching a program to track the damage caused by windows in homes.

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A Family of Bald Eagles Grows in Castro Valley

KQED Science | August 15, 2014 | 0 Comments

A Family of Bald Eagles Grows in Castro Valley

Iconic bald eagles are capturing our hearts through nest webcams that showcase their family dramas online. Learn more about a local eagle family that fledged not one, but two young eagles this year at Lake Chabot Regional Park.

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Some of Us May Have a Genetic Predisposition to Disliking Exercise

KQED Science | August 11, 2014 | 0 Comments

Some of Us May Have a Genetic Predisposition to Disliking Exercise

About 90% of us over the age of 12 fail to get as much exercise as we should. This is almost certainly not because we don’t believe in those benefits. Instead, it looks like at least part of the reason may be that some of us are genetically programmed to hate exercise.

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Stanford Scientists Use Fruit Flies to Study Diabetes

KQED Science | August 7, 2014 | 2 Comments

Stanford Scientists Use Fruit Flies to Study Diabetes

Stanford researchers have developed a new way to use fruit flies to sort through the complicated genetics of Type 2 diabetes.

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There’s a New Bird Species in California, Sort Of

KQED Science | August 4, 2014 | 3 Comments

There’s a New Bird Species in California, Sort Of

When is a clapper rail not a clapper rail? Answer: when it's in California, as it turns out.

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What Is Schizophrenia? Scientists Call for New Thinking

KQED Science | August 4, 2014 | 8 Comments

What Is Schizophrenia? Scientists Call for New Thinking

For two generations, psychiatrists have treated schizophrenia by medicating its most obvious symptoms: delusions and hallucinations. Were they wrong?

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A Tale of Two Tern Towns in the Bay Area

KQED Science | August 1, 2014 | 0 Comments

A Tale of Two Tern Towns in the Bay Area

The Bay Area hosts two large breeding colonies of endangered California least terns. Find out more about these birds and the East Bay Regional Park District's efforts to manage their populations.

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Deep-Sea Octopus is Mother of the Year

KQED Science | July 30, 2014 | 0 Comments

Deep-Sea Octopus is Mother of the Year

Researchers from the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute discovered a deep-sea octopus that tends its eggs for 53 months, longer than any known animal.

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Genetically Engineering Wild Populations Could Be Just Around the Corner

KQED Science | July 28, 2014 | 0 Comments

Genetically Engineering Wild Populations Could Be Just Around the Corner

We might be able to use selfish genes to cause the population of mosquitoes that carry malaria to crash. Is genetically manipulating these insects out in the wild worth preventing hundreds of millions of people from getting malaria?

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