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Meditation May Ease PTSD in Combat Vets

KQED Science | November 8, 2013 | 0 Comments

Meditation May Ease PTSD in Combat Vets

The crisis of post-traumatic stress disorder -- both for newly returned vets and Vietnam vets who have lived with PTSD for decades -- is forcing the US military to explore some unorthodox treatments, including "compassion meditation."

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Silicon Valley in Race for Battery Breakthrough

KQED Science | November 1, 2013 | 2 Comments

Silicon Valley in Race for Battery Breakthrough

The global battery race is on and the Bay Area is in it to win.

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/audio/road-kill-or-road-crossing-california-slow-to-protect-wildlife/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=road-kill-or-road-crossing-california-slow-to-protect-wildlife target=_blank >Road Kill or Road Crossing: California Slow to Protect Wildlife</a>

QUEST | October 18, 2013

Road Kill or Road Crossing: California Slow to Protect Wildlife

Drivers hit thousands of animals every year on California freeways, often killing the wildlife, and sometimes killing or injuring the human, too. Several western states have built fencing and other infrastructure to help wildlife cross freeways safely, and critics say California could be doing a lot more of the same.

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Should Every Newborn Undergo Genetic Testing?

KQED Science | October 11, 2013 | 1 Comment

Should Every Newborn Undergo Genetic Testing?

The NIH has launched a five-year, $25 million dollar effort to explore what may be one of the great ethical dilemmas of the 21st century: Just because we can do genetic testing on infants, should we?

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Watsonville Lacks Funds to Control Toxic Algae, Threatening Wildlife

KQED Science | October 4, 2013 | 0 Comments

Watsonville Lacks Funds to Control Toxic Algae, Threatening Wildlife

The city of Watsonville has an expensive problem on its hands: toxic algae stirred up from the bottom of Pinto Lake makes the lake poisonous to humans and deadly to birds, fish, and even the otters in Monterey Bay, where the lake water eventually empties into the sea. Knowing how to clean it is one thing; paying for it is another.

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What Does an Epileptic Seizure Sound Like?

KQED Science | October 1, 2013 | 0 Comments

What Does an Epileptic Seizure Sound Like?

A neurologist collaborates with a music professor to translate the electrical signals of hidden seizures into sound. The result: a "stethoscope for the brain."

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Can Renewable Energy Reduce California’s Fire Risk?

KQED Science | September 27, 2013 | 0 Comments

Can Renewable Energy Reduce California’s Fire Risk?

The Rim Fire is calling attention to a big problem: California’s forests are overloaded with fuel after a century of putting out fires. There’s a new push to use that fuel to make renewable energy, but it's sparked a heated debate.

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California’s Fire History Written in the Trees

KQED Science | September 13, 2013 | 0 Comments

California’s Fire History Written in the Trees

Scientists are finding that in the not-too-distant past, forest fires were much larger than they are today, and forests burned more often. The difference is that the forests bounced back much more readily.

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How Do These Boats Sail Faster Than the Wind?

KQED Science | September 11, 2013 | 4 Comments

How Do These Boats Sail Faster Than the Wind?

It isn’t magic; it’s just physics. And it’s an idea as simple as rocket science, which in this case really breaks down to what you learned from riding a bike.

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Tracking Wildlife (Not Wild Life) on San Francisco’s Market Street

KQED Science | September 9, 2013 | 1 Comment

Tracking Wildlife (Not Wild Life) on San Francisco’s Market Street

Studying the "wildlife" of San Francisco's Market Street isn't exactly what you might think. Turns out it's a habitat that seems to attract butterflies and other critters.

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Warming Climate Could Transform Bay Area Parks and Open Space

KQED Science | September 9, 2013 | 0 Comments

Warming Climate Could Transform Bay Area Parks and Open Space

By the end of the century, the Bay Area's landscape could look more like Southern California's, raising tough questions for land managers trying to preserve parks and open space.

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Congrats, It’s an App! Family Planning with Your Smartphone

KQED Science | August 30, 2013 | 1 Comment

Congrats, It’s an App! Family Planning with Your Smartphone

Fertility apps are the newest high-tech trend in helping people conceive. There are dozens of apps on the market that help women find their fertility window. One high-profile app is going a step further, and asking some very personal questions.

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Climate Scientist to Politicians: It’s Time to Face the Facts

KQED Science | August 23, 2013 | 4 Comments

Climate Scientist to Politicians: It’s Time to Face the Facts

In California, polling shows that most people think climate change is already having an effect. But scientists are concerned that politicians are not acting fast enough. Now a UC Berkeley professor is urging other scientists to speak out.

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Is Raising Shasta Dam the Best Bet for California’s Water Supply?

KQED Science | August 16, 2013 | 4 Comments

Is Raising Shasta Dam the Best Bet for California’s Water Supply?

Shasta Lake is the largest reservoir in California, and government officials are completing plans to make it even larger by raising the height of the dam. But the expansion has sparked intense debates among local residents, Central Valley farmers, environmentalists, tribal groups and developers.

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Valero Rail Project Fuels Tar Sands Speculation in Bay Area

KQED Science | August 9, 2013 | 2 Comments

Valero Rail Project Fuels Tar Sands Speculation in Bay Area

Valero wants to start using trains to bring crude oil to its Bay Area refinery. But the project is raising concerns about congestion, safety and air pollution in the East Bay city of Benicia – and the connection it may have to Canada’s controversial tar sands.

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In the Experience of Doubt, a Possible Cure for Alcoholism

KQED Science | August 2, 2013 | 3 Comments

In the Experience of Doubt, a Possible Cure for Alcoholism

In some alcoholics, the act of overriding one's better judgment to have another drink can be traced to a specific network in the brain. The question is, can you make it do something else?

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Does Your Range Hood Suck? Cooking Spikes Indoor Air Pollution

KQED Science | July 26, 2013 | 9 Comments

Does Your Range Hood Suck? Cooking Spikes Indoor Air Pollution

When you're cooking dinner, the air inside your kitchen can sometimes be just as harmful as smog. Range hoods are designed to capture cooking fumes, but even some expensive models aren’t very effective. Researchers are trying to fix that.

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/audio/toilet-to-tap/ target=_blank >Water Recycling Comes of Age in Silicon Valley</a>

QUEST | July 19, 2013

Water Recycling Comes of Age in Silicon Valley

Engineers can purify sewage water to make it cleaner than what’s coming out of your tap, but there's a bigger challenge: convincing people to drink it.

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As World’s Largest Solar Thermal Plant Opens, California Looks to End Solar Wars

KQED Science | July 12, 2013 | 40 Comments

As World’s Largest Solar Thermal Plant Opens, California Looks to End Solar Wars

After controversy over a threatened species delayed several large solar projects, state officials are trying to broker an agreement between conservation groups and solar companies on a path forward for renewable energy.

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Can Mammalian Mothers Control the Sex of their Offspring?

KQED Science | July 12, 2013 | 0 Comments

Can Mammalian Mothers Control the Sex of their Offspring?

A new study suggests that mammals may be able to determine the gender of their offspring.

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