Donate

RSSAstronomy

Meteor Crashed with the Force of 600,000 Tons of TNT, Say Scientists (And It’ll Happen Again)

KQED Science | November 6, 2013 | 0 Comments

Meteor Crashed with the Force of 600,000 Tons of TNT, Say Scientists (And It’ll Happen Again)

The Chelyabinsk meteor was a 65-foot hunk of space rock that entered the Earth's atmosphere at about 12 miles per second before exploding with a force equal to 600,000 tons of TNT, enough to level buildings and send 1,200 people to local hospitals.

Continue Reading

Kepler Team: Universe “Crowded” with Earth-Like Planets

KQED Science | November 4, 2013 | 0 Comments

Kepler Team: Universe “Crowded” with Earth-Like Planets

A NASA scientist sums it up: “If we ever get star travel, we’ll probably see a lot of traffic jams.”

Continue Reading

Juno Aims to Pierce the Veil of Jupiter’s Cloud-Shrouded Mystery

KQED Science | November 1, 2013 | 0 Comments

Juno Aims to Pierce the Veil of Jupiter’s Cloud-Shrouded Mystery

Over centuries of observing the planet Jupiter, we have but scratched the surface of the deep mysteries held secret beneath its thick clouds. Now NASA's Juno probe, currently en route to the king of planets, is preparing to pierce the veil of Jupiter's mystery and give us a peek inside.

Continue Reading

Comet ISON: Celestial Popcorn That’s Ready to Pop?

KQED Science | October 18, 2013 | 0 Comments

Comet ISON: Celestial Popcorn That’s Ready to Pop?

Maybe a week before it passes closest to the sun, the dark side of Comet ISON is expected to begin turning into the sunlight. The sudden exposure to the intense radiation could cause a strong outburst of gases into the coma--like a celestial popcorn kernel suddenly bursting.

Continue Reading

NASA’s ‘Mohawk Guy’ on the Search for Signs of Life on Mars

KQED Science | October 15, 2013 | 0 Comments

NASA’s ‘Mohawk Guy’ on the Search for Signs of Life on Mars

NASA's "Engineer with a Mohawk" has become a pop culture phenom (62,000 Twitter followers isn't too shabby). But under that comb beats the heart of a true explorer, as we found when he dropped by for a visit.

Continue Reading

NASA Robots Are Sniffing For Clues on Mars and Titan

KQED Science | October 4, 2013 | 0 Comments

NASA Robots Are Sniffing For Clues on Mars and Titan

NASA's Curiosity rover on Mars has raised some eyebrows by something it has not detected: methane. And, much farther out, the Cassini spacecraft has made a positive detection of plastic in the atmosphere of Saturn's moon Titan.

Continue Reading

Peeling Away the Moon’s Mysteries

KQED Science | September 23, 2013 | 1 Comment

Peeling Away the Moon’s Mysteries

The moon often seems like an ancient relic of space exploration, that dusty, dry, airless ball of rock and soil that we visited decades ago and have since left alone—possibly because we found nothing there but dust, rock, and soil? Not so fast. Exploration in the past few years has revealed aspects of the moon that contradict what we were taught in school.

Continue Reading

Comet ISON: Comet of the Century or Fanciful Fluff?

KQED Science | September 6, 2013 | 3 Comments

Comet ISON: Comet of the Century or Fanciful Fluff?

A comet named ISON has been hailed as a possible "comet of the century." But scientists aren't sure yet if it will survive a hairpin turn around the sun.

Continue Reading

New NASA Moon Mission Aims to Solve a 40-Year-Old Mystery

KQED Science | September 3, 2013 | 0 Comments

New NASA Moon Mission Aims to Solve a 40-Year-Old Mystery

In 1972, an Apollo 17 astronaut glimpsed a strange phenomenon of streaming light from the window of the command module as it orbited the dark side of the moon. Now, a new NASA mission aims to discover what caused that phenomenon, and whether it could be a hazard for future lunar landings.

Continue Reading

Generations of Exploration: From Hubble to the James Webb Space Telescope

KQED Science | August 23, 2013 | 0 Comments

Generations of Exploration: From Hubble to the James Webb Space Telescope

If you think the list of achievements of NASA's Hubble Space Telescope is impressive, consider that its successor, the James Webb Space Telescope, will sport a mirror 21 feet across, with more than 20 times the light-collecting capability of its predecessor!

Continue Reading

Rare Meteorite Lands Permanently at UC Davis

KQED Science | August 21, 2013 | 0 Comments

Rare Meteorite Lands Permanently at UC Davis

UC Davis is acquiring a chunk of meteorite that landed in Northern California last year. The meteorite's age makes it rare and valuable. It contains dust from ancient stars that exploded, the same stuff that eventually formed our solar system.

Continue Reading

The Perseids Are Coming! Find Out When And Where To View Them

KQED Science | August 9, 2013 | 1 Comment

The Perseids Are Coming! Find Out When And Where To View Them

It's time to enjoy the annual Perseid meteors, the Old Faithful of meteor showers that lights up the August night and thoroughly delights those sleepy souls willing to stay up past midnight for one of nature's original fireworks shows.

Continue Reading

The Temptation to Treat Hunches As Science in Earthquake Prediction Research

KQED Science | August 1, 2013 | 8 Comments

The Temptation to Treat Hunches As Science in Earthquake Prediction Research

The science of earthquake prediction is fraught with the human tendency to seek conclusions beyond the reach of the data. In this setting, even the fruitless hypothesis of sunspots is seductive.

Continue Reading

Smile! You’re On NASA’s Cassini Camera

KQED Science | July 26, 2013 | 0 Comments

Smile! You’re On NASA’s Cassini Camera

On July 19, NASA's Cassini probe captured a picture of the Earth and Moon, offering us a perspective of all of humanity on one tiny dot in space, and a reminder that Cassini is still out there exploring the distant reaches of the Solar System.

Continue Reading

The Great Space Race Continues On Mars!

KQED Science | July 12, 2013 | 0 Comments

The Great Space Race Continues On Mars!

NASA's enduring Mars Exploration Rover, Opportunity, which has been traipsing about and exploring Mars' Meridiani Planum for nearly ten years now, recently broke a record for distance traveled on the surface of another world.

Continue Reading

It’s Dune-Boarding Season on Mars!

KQED Science | June 28, 2013 | 0 Comments

It’s Dune-Boarding Season on Mars!

NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and its high-powered HiRISE camera has been capturing extremely detailed pictures all over the surface of Mars for a few years now. MRO now reveals a number of surprising, curious, and often captivating landscape features, many of which have inferred the action of dynamic weather processes on Mars.

Continue Reading

The Supermoon Is Coming

KQED Science | June 21, 2013 | 0 Comments

The Supermoon Is Coming

No need to feel all deflated once the longest day of the year is over: you still have the supermoon to look forward to. That's when the full moon is especially close to the Earth. And it's coming this weekend.

Continue Reading

Curiosity Prepares to Set Forth From Base Camp At Last

KQED Science | June 14, 2013 | 0 Comments

Curiosity Prepares to Set Forth From Base Camp At Last

After ten months of studying a small patch of Mars half a mile from its landing point, NASA's Curiosity rover pulls up stakes, packs its bags and prepares to set forth on a trek to reach the base of Mount Sharp, a layered mound of Martian geologic history with secrets just waiting to be discovered.

Continue Reading

Is NASA’s Kepler Spacecraft Down For The Count?

KQED Science | May 31, 2013 | 0 Comments

Is NASA’s Kepler Spacecraft Down For The Count?

Is NASA's Kepler spacecraft, that amazing extrasolar-planet-spotter in the sky, down for the count?

Continue Reading

Giant Asteroid “QE2″ is Due for a Fly-By

KQED Science | May 30, 2013 | 1 Comment

Giant Asteroid “QE2″ is Due for a Fly-By

A rock the size of nine cruise ships will whiz past Earth on Friday afternoon. The asteroid, called QE2, will pass by at a safe distance of about 3.6 million miles, the closest we’ll get to it for another 200 years.

Continue Reading