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The Great Space Race Continues On Mars!

KQED Science | July 12, 2013 | 0 Comments

The Great Space Race Continues On Mars!

NASA's enduring Mars Exploration Rover, Opportunity, which has been traipsing about and exploring Mars' Meridiani Planum for nearly ten years now, recently broke a record for distance traveled on the surface of another world.

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It’s Dune-Boarding Season on Mars!

KQED Science | June 28, 2013 | 0 Comments

It’s Dune-Boarding Season on Mars!

NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and its high-powered HiRISE camera has been capturing extremely detailed pictures all over the surface of Mars for a few years now. MRO now reveals a number of surprising, curious, and often captivating landscape features, many of which have inferred the action of dynamic weather processes on Mars.

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The Supermoon Is Coming

KQED Science | June 21, 2013 | 0 Comments

The Supermoon Is Coming

No need to feel all deflated once the longest day of the year is over: you still have the supermoon to look forward to. That's when the full moon is especially close to the Earth. And it's coming this weekend.

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Curiosity Prepares to Set Forth From Base Camp At Last

KQED Science | June 14, 2013 | 0 Comments

Curiosity Prepares to Set Forth From Base Camp At Last

After ten months of studying a small patch of Mars half a mile from its landing point, NASA's Curiosity rover pulls up stakes, packs its bags and prepares to set forth on a trek to reach the base of Mount Sharp, a layered mound of Martian geologic history with secrets just waiting to be discovered.

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Is NASA’s Kepler Spacecraft Down For The Count?

KQED Science | May 31, 2013 | 0 Comments

Is NASA’s Kepler Spacecraft Down For The Count?

Is NASA's Kepler spacecraft, that amazing extrasolar-planet-spotter in the sky, down for the count?

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Giant Asteroid “QE2″ is Due for a Fly-By

KQED Science | May 30, 2013 | 1 Comment

Giant Asteroid “QE2″ is Due for a Fly-By

A rock the size of nine cruise ships will whiz past Earth on Friday afternoon. The asteroid, called QE2, will pass by at a safe distance of about 3.6 million miles, the closest we’ll get to it for another 200 years.

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B612 Foundation: Defending the Earth from Merciless Asteroids

KQED Science | May 17, 2013 | 1 Comment

B612 Foundation: Defending the Earth from Merciless Asteroids

Envision the Earth plunging through space and passing a sign that warns, “Watch for falling rocks.” Now, what are we going to do deflect a catastrophic collision from space?

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Kepler Scientist: “A Beautiful Instrument Has Died”

KQED Science | May 15, 2013 | 0 Comments

Kepler Scientist: “A Beautiful Instrument Has Died”

One of NASA’s most popular and successful missions has hit a disabling technical snag. The Kepler space telescope was launched on a search to disprove the notion that Earth is unique in the universe. Over four years, it found more than 100 planets orbiting distant stars.

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2013/05/03/the-state-of-the-universe-matter-and-age-up-dark-energy-down/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=the-state-of-the-universe-matter-and-age-up-dark-energy-down target=_blank >The State of the Universe: Matter and Age Up, Dark Energy Down</a>

QUEST | May 3, 2013

The State of the Universe: Matter and Age Up, Dark Energy Down

Smile, universe, for your baby picture! Maps of the early universe by the COBE, WMAP, and Planck missions. Image credit: NASA On news that the universe may be 100 million years older than previously estimated, cosmological markets have seen a reduction in the benchmark of ...

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<a href=http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2013/04/23/119834/androids_in_orbit_smartphones_become_satellites?category=science target=_blank >Androids in Orbit: Smartphones Become Satellites</a>

KQED News | April 24, 2013

Androids in Orbit: Smartphones Become Satellites

Smartphones do some impressive things these days: navigation, speech recognition, Angry Birds. Now, add “flying through space” to that list. Engineers at NASA's Ames Research Center have turned three off-the-shelf smartphones into miniature satellites, currently orbiting 150 miles above the Earth. “A cell phone has all the kinds of sensors ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/audio/attack-of-the-killer-electrons-new-mission-searches-for-mysterious-space-particles/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=attack-of-the-killer-electrons-new-mission-searches-for-mysterious-space-particles target=_blank >Attack of the Killer Electrons! New Mission Searches for Mysterious Space Particles</a>

QUEST | March 9, 2013

Attack of the Killer Electrons! New Mission Searches for Mysterious Space Particles

They’re out there… Traveling at close to the speed of light high above the Earth and damaging any satellite in their path. They’re called “killer electrons” and this year, Bay Area researchers are working with a new NASA mission to unlock their mysterious behavior. Killer electrons aren’t a threat to life ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2013/03/08/comets-may-have-delivered-lifes-early-building-blocks/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=comets-may-have-delivered-lifes-early-building-blocks target=_blank >Comets May Have Delivered Life's Early Building Blocks</a>

QUEST | March 8, 2013

Comets May Have Delivered Life's Early Building Blocks

NASA The building blocks of life on Earth may have originated in space. Chemists at the University of California, Berkeley and the University of Hawaii, Manoa have found the complex compounds essential for life can be forged in the vacuum of space. The linked pairs of ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2013/03/08/how-big-is-your-world/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=how-big-is-your-world target=_blank >How Big is Your World?</a>

QUEST | March 8, 2013

How Big is Your World?

Is your world big or small? Is the universe really so big, or are we just very, very small? Okay, I admit it, this is a question I've toyed with for a very long time—since sometime back in childhood. It all started around the time I ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2013/02/22/mars-rovercuriosity-digs-a-little-deeper/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=mars-rovercuriosity-digs-a-little-deeper target=_blank >The Mars Rover Curiosity Digs a Little Deeper</a>

QUEST | February 22, 2013

The Mars Rover Curiosity Digs a Little Deeper

Before sending the Curiosity rover to Mars, its drilling technology was tested exhaustively by drilling many holes in samples of Earth rock. Add another word to your vocabulary of Martian geological exploration: thwacking…repeat, not fracking, but thwacking! Thwack: to strike with or as if with ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2013/02/15/asteroid-2012-da14-in-line-for-a-rim-shot/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=asteroid-2012-da14-in-line-for-a-rim-shot target=_blank >Asteroid 2012 DA14: In Line For a Rim Shot</a>

QUEST | February 15, 2013

Asteroid 2012 DA14: In Line For a Rim Shot

Asteroid 2012 DA14 Flyby February 15 2013 Update: A 150-foot asteroid hurtled through Earth's backyard Friday, coming within an incredible 17,150 miles and making the closest known flyby for a rock of its size. Get more info at KQED News. Duck! Here comes ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2013/01/25/mars-mountainclimbing-mashup/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=mars-mountainclimbing-mashup target=_blank >Mars Mountain Climbing Mashup!</a>

QUEST | January 25, 2013

Mars Mountain Climbing Mashup!

Comparison of heights of Mars' Mount Sharp and some of Earth's tallest mountains Ready for a real mash-up of explorer-history-science-mountaineering yack? A tale of two mountains on two planets? You have been forewarned… The comparison between Earth-side mountain exploration and the planned expedition by the Mars ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2013/01/17/placing-a-bet-on-the-surface-of-mars/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=placing-a-bet-on-the-surface-of-mars target=_blank >Placing a Bet on the Surface of Mars</a>

QUEST | January 17, 2013

Placing a Bet on the Surface of Mars

Mars has been on my radar for a very long time, since the astonishing day back in 1965 when Mariner 10 first sent back a picture of craters on its surface. So I'm not a Johnny-come-lately to the red planet. I've followed the news from every Mars mission, orbiters and ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2012/12/28/weighing-in-with-gravity/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=weighing-in-with-gravity target=_blank >Weighing in With Gravity</a>

QUEST | December 28, 2012

Weighing in With Gravity

Veitimilla Summit, Ecuador How do you feel today? Heavy as a ton of lead, or a ton of feathers? Light on your feet, or dragging on the ground? It probably depends on a lot of things, most particularly your present physical state, and possibly on ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2012/12/14/touch-the-sun-at-chabot-space-science-center/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=touch-the-sun-at-chabot-space-science-center target=_blank >Touch the Sun at Chabot Space & Science Center</a>

QUEST | December 14, 2012

Touch the Sun at Chabot Space & Science Center

Ultraviolet image of the Sun, NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory-July 28 2012 Just in time for the imminent event of Solar Maximum, when the sun reaches a crescendo in its 11-year cycle of magnetic activity and all the sunspots, solar flares, coronal mass ejections, and other ...

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<a href=http://science.kqed.org/quest/2012/11/30/still-curious-about-mars-in-2012/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=still-curious-about-mars-in-2012 target=_blank >Still Curious About Mars in 2012</a>

QUEST | November 30, 2012

Still Curious About Mars in 2012

Artist illustration of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory rover, Curiosity. We've been thinking about life on Mars for a long, long time. At first it was easy. Before the telescope, Mars was a brilliant spark of orange light that moved about the sky with the other ...

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