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Molly Samuel

Molly Samuel joined KQED as an intern in 2007, and since then has worked here as a reporter, producer, director and blogger. Before becoming KQED Science’s Multimedia Producer, she was a producer for Climate Watch. Molly has also reported for NPR, KALW and High Country News, and has produced audio stories for The Encyclopedia of Life and the Oakland Museum of California. She was a fellow with the Middlebury Fellowships in Environmental Journalism and a journalist-in-residence at the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center. Molly has a degree in Ancient Greek from Oberlin College and is a co-founder of the record label True Panther Sounds.

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Molly Samuel's Latest Posts

New Species Discovered by Bay Area Scientists

KQED Science | January 3, 2014 | 0 Comments

New Species Discovered by Bay Area Scientists

The work of finding and describing species new to science isn't just something Charles Darwin did. Scientists at Bay Area institutions have discovered ants in Madagascar, barnacles in the Gulf of Guinea and legless lizards here in California.

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The Endangered Species Act Turns 40

KQED Science | December 27, 2013 | 0 Comments

The Endangered Species Act Turns 40

President Richard Nixon signed the Endangered Species Act into law in 1973, saying, "Nothing is more priceless and more worthy of preservation than the rich array of animal life with which our country has been blessed." Opponents criticize it for punishing private landowners. Some supporters say it doesn't do enough to protect whole ecosystems.

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49ers Tackle Sustainability With New Green Stadium

KQED Science | December 23, 2013 | 5 Comments

49ers Tackle Sustainability With New Green Stadium

49ers fans may miss the cold weather at Candlestick Park, but can look forward to solar panels, bicycle parking and grass watered with recycled water. Levi’s Stadium in Santa Clara is being touted as the greenest stadium in the NFL.

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Activists Take Aim at Bay Area Crude Oil Projects

KQED Science | December 4, 2013 | 1 Comment

Activists Take Aim at Bay Area Crude Oil Projects

Local activists are sounding an alarm over four proposed crude oil projects in the Bay Area. They say they're concerned about the health and environmental implications of the developments.

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What Does a Federal Safety Investigation Mean for Tesla?

KQED Science | November 19, 2013 | 0 Comments

What Does a Federal Safety Investigation Mean for Tesla?

Tuesday morning, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration announced it would investigate two incidents in which Tesla Model S sedans caught fire. Both times the cars hit debris on a highway and the undercarriage and batteries were damaged.

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Can California Burn its Way Out of its Wildfire Problem?

KQED Science | November 15, 2013 | 3 Comments

Can California Burn its Way Out of its Wildfire Problem?

People who fight and study fire generally agree that one of the best tools for preventing massive wildfires is prescribed burning: intentionally setting smaller fires before the big ones hit. But there are major challenges to fighting fire with fire.

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Inside the New Tunnel 100 Feet Below San Francisco Bay

KQED Science | October 17, 2013 | 0 Comments

Inside the New Tunnel 100 Feet Below San Francisco Bay

The $286 million tunnel is the first ever to cross under the Bay, and -- once it comes online in 2015 -- will carry 300 million gallons of water a day from the Hetch Hetchy Reservoir to San Francisco and Peninsula residents.

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NASA’s ‘Mohawk Guy’ on the Search for Signs of Life on Mars

KQED Science | October 15, 2013 | 0 Comments

NASA’s ‘Mohawk Guy’ on the Search for Signs of Life on Mars

NASA's "Engineer with a Mohawk" has become a pop culture phenom (62,000 Twitter followers isn't too shabby). But under that comb beats the heart of a true explorer, as we found when he dropped by for a visit.

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New State Laws on Fracking and Toxics: A Mixed Bag for Environmentalists

KQED Science | October 14, 2013 | 0 Comments

New State Laws on Fracking and Toxics: A Mixed Bag for Environmentalists

Now that California's legislative session is now over, here's a roundup of the environmental bills that passed -- and a review of some big ones that didn't.

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Carbon Nanotube Computer Paves Way for Faster, Smaller Tech

KQED Science | September 26, 2013 | 1 Comment

Carbon Nanotube Computer Paves Way for Faster, Smaller Tech

The quest for ever-smaller and faster computers has taken a significant step forward. Engineers at Stanford have developed a process to build computers that use carbon nanotubes instead of silicon.

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California Lake’s Toxic Algae Among Worst in U.S.

KQED Science | September 24, 2013 | 3 Comments

California Lake’s Toxic Algae Among Worst in U.S.

A lake near Santa Cruz has the highest levels of toxic algae in the state, and some of the highest in the country, according to a new study. The report highlights Pinto Lake, which is in a park just outside of Watsonville.

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Birders Flock to See Blue-Footed Boobies

KQED Science | September 19, 2013 | 2 Comments

Birders Flock to See Blue-Footed Boobies

Blue-footed boobies are most commonly seen down in the Gulf of California or the Galapagos, but this week they’ve been flooding the Southern California coast, and making their way up north, where very few have come before.

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Tracking Wildlife (Not Wild Life) on San Francisco’s Market Street

KQED Science | September 9, 2013 | 1 Comment

Tracking Wildlife (Not Wild Life) on San Francisco’s Market Street

Studying the "wildlife" of San Francisco's Market Street isn't exactly what you might think. Turns out it's a habitat that seems to attract butterflies and other critters.

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Appeals Court Rules Against Drakes Bay Oyster Company

KQED Science | September 3, 2013 | 2 Comments

Appeals Court Rules Against Drakes Bay Oyster Company

A new court order may be the final blow for the Drakes Bay Oyster Company, located within the Point Reyes National Seashore. The oyster farm will not be allowed to continue operating while it awaits an appeal to the decision not to renew its lease.

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Rare Meteorite Lands Permanently at UC Davis

KQED Science | August 21, 2013 | 0 Comments

Rare Meteorite Lands Permanently at UC Davis

UC Davis is acquiring a chunk of meteorite that landed in Northern California last year. The meteorite's age makes it rare and valuable. It contains dust from ancient stars that exploded, the same stuff that eventually formed our solar system.

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California’s Redwoods May be Benefiting From Climate Change

KQED Science | August 14, 2013 | 4 Comments

California’s Redwoods May be Benefiting From Climate Change

The world's biggest trees are experiencing a growth spurt, and scientists think climate change may be playing a part in it.

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Valero Rail Project Fuels Tar Sands Speculation in Bay Area

KQED Science | August 9, 2013 | 2 Comments

Valero Rail Project Fuels Tar Sands Speculation in Bay Area

Valero wants to start using trains to bring crude oil to its Bay Area refinery. But the project is raising concerns about congestion, safety and air pollution in the East Bay city of Benicia – and the connection it may have to Canada’s controversial tar sands.

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Google Looking to Launch High-Flying Wireless Project

KQED Science | July 30, 2013 | 0 Comments

Google Looking to Launch High-Flying Wireless Project

Google is testing a project that would bring the internet to people in rural areas and developing nations via high-altitude balloons.

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Embattled Oyster Farm Faces New Legal Challenge

KQED Science | July 17, 2013 | 0 Comments

Embattled Oyster Farm Faces New Legal Challenge

The Sebastopol-based environmental group California River Watch claims Drakes Bay Oyster Company is polluting the waterway known as Drakes Estero, and is threatening to sue the company.

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How the Bay’s Natural Buffers Can Help Defend Us From Sea Level Rise

KQED Science | July 16, 2013 | 0 Comments

How the Bay’s Natural Buffers Can Help Defend Us From Sea Level Rise

When it comes to protecting people and property from rising sea levels and catastrophic storms, it turns out that Mother Nature can often provide a better solution than an expensive engineering project.

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