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Molly Samuel

Molly Samuel joined KQED as an intern in 2007, and since then has worked here as a reporter, producer, director and blogger. Before becoming KQED Science’s Multimedia Producer, she was a producer for Climate Watch. Molly has also reported for NPR, KALW and High Country News, and has produced audio stories for The Encyclopedia of Life and the Oakland Museum of California. She was a fellow with the Middlebury Fellowships in Environmental Journalism and a journalist-in-residence at the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center. Molly has a degree in Ancient Greek from Oberlin College and is a co-founder of the record label True Panther Sounds.

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Molly Samuel's Latest Posts

SpaceX Launches its Dragon Spacecraft to the International Space Station

KQED Science | April 18, 2014 | 0 Comments

SpaceX Launches its Dragon Spacecraft to the International Space Station

SpaceX, a private space company, is trying again on Friday to launch its Dragon spacecraft to the International Space Station. Its first attempt to launch this mission was scratched on Monday because of a helium leak.

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Monday’s SpaceX Launch Cancelled; Next Opportunity is April 18

KQED Science | April 14, 2014 | 0 Comments

Monday’s SpaceX Launch Cancelled; Next Opportunity is April 18

SpaceX is launching a rocket to the International Space Station this afternoon. The live webcast begins at 12:45 PST and the launch itself is scheduled for 1:58.

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Chevron Tries Again With Richmond Refinery Revamp

KQED Science | April 14, 2014 | 2 Comments

Chevron Tries Again With Richmond Refinery Revamp

Chevron is looking to launch a billion-dollar construction project at its Richmond refinery. It’s a slimmed down version of a project that environmentalists stopped with a lawsuit a few years ago.

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IPCC: Climate Change Is Taking a Toll in California and It’s Going to Get Worse

KQED Science | April 1, 2014 | 1 Comment

IPCC: Climate Change Is Taking a Toll in California and It’s Going to Get Worse

The latest report from the U.N.'s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change focuses on impacts from climate change, both current and looming, and recommendations for how to adapt.

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Bay Area Cities and Environmentalists Respond to Crude-By-Rail Boom

KQED Science | March 28, 2014 | 1 Comment

Bay Area Cities and Environmentalists Respond to Crude-By-Rail Boom

More and more crude oil is being transported into California by rail lines, and questions about safety are prompting local governments and environmentalists to take action.

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Stanford Scientists Celebrate Evidence of Universe’s Early Growth

KQED Science | March 17, 2014 | 0 Comments

Stanford Scientists Celebrate Evidence of Universe’s Early Growth

In one of the first tiny fractions of an instant after the Big Bang, the Universe expanded explosively, faster than the speed of light. That exponential expansion of, well, everything, is described by the theory of inflation, which may now be confirmed.

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How Corrosive Water off the West Coast Threatens the Food Chain

KQED Science | March 17, 2014 | 14 Comments

How Corrosive Water off the West Coast Threatens the Food Chain

Earlier this year, managers at a hatchery near Vancouver, Canada said they lost three years' worth of scallops -- 10 million animals -- to acidic waters. Ocean acidification is worse off the West Coast than anywhere else in North America.

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Fukushima Radiation on its Way to California, Scientists Say it Poses No Threat

KQED Science | February 24, 2014 | 87 Comments

Fukushima Radiation on its Way to California, Scientists Say it Poses No Threat

Scientists are testing samples and using models to try to zero in on when it will reach the California coast and how much there will be when it does.

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Gas Tax Proposed for California Would Change Existing Climate Law

KQED Science | February 20, 2014 | 15 Comments

Gas Tax Proposed for California Would Change Existing Climate Law

State Senator Darrell Steinberg is proposing a carbon tax on gasoline that would put a price on the pollution that causes climate change. The plan would also dismantle a key piece of California's existing climate law.

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Ticks in the Bay Area Can Carry Lyme Disease – and That’s Not All

KQED Science | February 18, 2014 | 2 Comments

Ticks in the Bay Area Can Carry Lyme Disease – and That’s Not All

Contrary to a common misconception, ticks in the Bay Area can carry the bacteria that causes Lyme Disease. And it turns out local ticks carry another pathogen that can make you sick, too.

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Bay Area Residents Resist Crude-by-Rail as Accidents Rise

KQED Science | February 17, 2014 | 3 Comments

Bay Area Residents Resist Crude-by-Rail as Accidents Rise

The East Bay city of Pittsburg is considering a new oil terminal to supply crude to Bay Area refineries, but some locals are concerned about the safety of the project.

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One Step Closer to Nuclear Fusion Reactions

KQED Science | February 12, 2014 | 2 Comments

One Step Closer to Nuclear Fusion Reactions

Physicists at Lawrence Livermore National Lab's National Ignition Facility said they've taken a significant step toward achieving nuclear fusion ignition.

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California Drought Could Take a Toll on Electricity Supply

KQED Science | February 4, 2014 | 0 Comments

California Drought Could Take a Toll on Electricity Supply

California's deepening drought could have an effect on the electricity supply. Hydropower usually accounts for about 14 percent of the state's power, but with low reservoir levels, officials are preparing for it to be less.

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California Drought: 17 Communities on the Critical List

KQED Science | January 29, 2014 | 1 Comment

California Drought: 17 Communities on the Critical List

It finally rained and snowed in parts of Northern California, but we are still deep in a drought. Now, 17 communities in California are at risk of running out of water within 60 to 100 days.

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Mavericks Surf Competition Is Friday; How and Where to Watch

KQED Science | January 23, 2014 | 0 Comments

Mavericks Surf Competition Is Friday; How and Where to Watch

Tens of thousands of people are expected to descend on Half Moon Bay to watch the big wave surf contest, but the beach and cliffs are off-limits to spectators. If you want to watch the competition, your options are on TV, online or at a festival near the beach.

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Amateur Astronomer and Telescope Inventor John Dobson Dies at 98

KQED Science | January 23, 2014 | 0 Comments

Amateur Astronomer and Telescope Inventor John Dobson Dies at 98

John Dobson, the co-founder of San Francisco Sidewalk Astronomers and the inventor of a telescope that people can build themselves, died on January 15 in Burbank. He was 98. For decades, Dobson introduced the public to the sky, setting up telescopes in cities and parks and inviting passers-by to take a look into space. And […]

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New Fukushima Radiation Study Will Focus on West Coast Kelp Forests

KQED Science | January 15, 2014 | 30 Comments

New Fukushima Radiation Study Will Focus on West Coast Kelp Forests

Researchers are launching a new project to monitor California's kelp forests for radiation from the Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan. Scientists will fan out along the California coast to collect kelp and find out if it has absorbed any radiation from the 2011 meltdown.

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Proposed Pittsburg Oil Project Draws Protest

KQED Science | January 11, 2014 | 0 Comments

Proposed Pittsburg Oil Project Draws Protest

The East Bay city of Pittsburg is considering a new oil terminal, which would supply crude to Bay Area refineries. Some residents are hoping to stop the plan in its tracks.

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Governor’s Budget Plan Getting High Marks from Environmentalists

KQED Science | January 9, 2014 | 2 Comments

Governor’s Budget Plan Getting High Marks from Environmentalists

Environmental groups are generally lauding Governor Jerry Brown's new budget, which includes an outline for spending revenue from the state's carbon auctions.

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New Species Discovered by Bay Area Scientists

KQED Science | January 3, 2014 | 0 Comments

New Species Discovered by Bay Area Scientists

The work of finding and describing species new to science isn't just something Charles Darwin did. Scientists at Bay Area institutions have discovered ants in Madagascar, barnacles in the Gulf of Guinea and legless lizards here in California.

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