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Molly Samuel

Molly Samuel joined KQED as an intern in 2007, and since then has worked here as a reporter, producer, director and blogger. Before becoming KQED Science’s Multimedia Producer, she was a producer for Climate Watch. Molly has also reported for NPR, KALW and High Country News, and has produced audio stories for The Encyclopedia of Life and the Oakland Museum of California. She was a fellow with the Middlebury Fellowships in Environmental Journalism and a journalist-in-residence at the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center. Molly has a degree in Ancient Greek from Oberlin College and is a co-founder of the record label True Panther Sounds.

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Molly Samuel's Latest Posts

One Step Closer to Nuclear Fusion Reactions

KQED Science | February 12, 2014 | 2 Comments

One Step Closer to Nuclear Fusion Reactions

Physicists at Lawrence Livermore National Lab's National Ignition Facility said they've taken a significant step toward achieving nuclear fusion ignition.

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California Drought Could Take a Toll on Electricity Supply

KQED Science | February 4, 2014 | 0 Comments

California Drought Could Take a Toll on Electricity Supply

California's deepening drought could have an effect on the electricity supply. Hydropower usually accounts for about 14 percent of the state's power, but with low reservoir levels, officials are preparing for it to be less.

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California Drought: 17 Communities on the Critical List

KQED Science | January 29, 2014 | 1 Comment

California Drought: 17 Communities on the Critical List

It finally rained and snowed in parts of Northern California, but we are still deep in a drought. Now, 17 communities in California are at risk of running out of water within 60 to 100 days.

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Mavericks Surf Competition Is Friday; How and Where to Watch

KQED Science | January 23, 2014 | 0 Comments

Mavericks Surf Competition Is Friday; How and Where to Watch

Tens of thousands of people are expected to descend on Half Moon Bay to watch the big wave surf contest, but the beach and cliffs are off-limits to spectators. If you want to watch the competition, your options are on TV, online or at a festival near the beach.

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Amateur Astronomer and Telescope Inventor John Dobson Dies at 98

KQED Science | January 23, 2014 | 0 Comments

Amateur Astronomer and Telescope Inventor John Dobson Dies at 98

John Dobson, the co-founder of San Francisco Sidewalk Astronomers and the inventor of a telescope that people can build themselves, died on January 15 in Burbank. He was 98. For decades, Dobson introduced the public to the sky, setting up telescopes in cities and parks and inviting passers-by to take a look into space. And […]

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New Fukushima Radiation Study Will Focus on West Coast Kelp Forests

KQED Science | January 15, 2014 | 28 Comments

New Fukushima Radiation Study Will Focus on West Coast Kelp Forests

Researchers are launching a new project to monitor California's kelp forests for radiation from the Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan. Scientists will fan out along the California coast to collect kelp and find out if it has absorbed any radiation from the 2011 meltdown.

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Proposed Pittsburg Oil Project Draws Protest

KQED Science | January 11, 2014 | 0 Comments

Proposed Pittsburg Oil Project Draws Protest

The East Bay city of Pittsburg is considering a new oil terminal, which would supply crude to Bay Area refineries. Some residents are hoping to stop the plan in its tracks.

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Governor’s Budget Plan Getting High Marks from Environmentalists

KQED Science | January 9, 2014 | 2 Comments

Governor’s Budget Plan Getting High Marks from Environmentalists

Environmental groups are generally lauding Governor Jerry Brown's new budget, which includes an outline for spending revenue from the state's carbon auctions.

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New Species Discovered by Bay Area Scientists

KQED Science | January 3, 2014 | 0 Comments

New Species Discovered by Bay Area Scientists

The work of finding and describing species new to science isn't just something Charles Darwin did. Scientists at Bay Area institutions have discovered ants in Madagascar, barnacles in the Gulf of Guinea and legless lizards here in California.

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The Endangered Species Act Turns 40

KQED Science | December 27, 2013 | 0 Comments

The Endangered Species Act Turns 40

President Richard Nixon signed the Endangered Species Act into law in 1973, saying, "Nothing is more priceless and more worthy of preservation than the rich array of animal life with which our country has been blessed." Opponents criticize it for punishing private landowners. Some supporters say it doesn't do enough to protect whole ecosystems.

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49ers Tackle Sustainability With New Green Stadium

KQED Science | December 23, 2013 | 5 Comments

49ers Tackle Sustainability With New Green Stadium

49ers fans may miss the cold weather at Candlestick Park, but can look forward to solar panels, bicycle parking and grass watered with recycled water. Levi’s Stadium in Santa Clara is being touted as the greenest stadium in the NFL.

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Activists Take Aim at Bay Area Crude Oil Projects

KQED Science | December 4, 2013 | 1 Comment

Activists Take Aim at Bay Area Crude Oil Projects

Local activists are sounding an alarm over four proposed crude oil projects in the Bay Area. They say they're concerned about the health and environmental implications of the developments.

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What Does a Federal Safety Investigation Mean for Tesla?

KQED Science | November 19, 2013 | 0 Comments

What Does a Federal Safety Investigation Mean for Tesla?

Tuesday morning, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration announced it would investigate two incidents in which Tesla Model S sedans caught fire. Both times the cars hit debris on a highway and the undercarriage and batteries were damaged.

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Can California Burn its Way Out of its Wildfire Problem?

KQED Science | November 15, 2013 | 5 Comments

Can California Burn its Way Out of its Wildfire Problem?

People who fight and study fire generally agree that one of the best tools for preventing massive wildfires is prescribed burning: intentionally setting smaller fires before the big ones hit. But there are major challenges to fighting fire with fire.

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Inside the New Tunnel 100 Feet Below San Francisco Bay

KQED Science | October 17, 2013 | 0 Comments

Inside the New Tunnel 100 Feet Below San Francisco Bay

The $286 million tunnel is the first ever to cross under the Bay, and -- once it comes online in 2015 -- will carry 300 million gallons of water a day from the Hetch Hetchy Reservoir to San Francisco and Peninsula residents.

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NASA’s ‘Mohawk Guy’ on the Search for Signs of Life on Mars

KQED Science | October 15, 2013 | 0 Comments

NASA’s ‘Mohawk Guy’ on the Search for Signs of Life on Mars

NASA's "Engineer with a Mohawk" has become a pop culture phenom (62,000 Twitter followers isn't too shabby). But under that comb beats the heart of a true explorer, as we found when he dropped by for a visit.

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New State Laws on Fracking and Toxics: A Mixed Bag for Environmentalists

KQED Science | October 14, 2013 | 0 Comments

New State Laws on Fracking and Toxics: A Mixed Bag for Environmentalists

Now that California's legislative session is now over, here's a roundup of the environmental bills that passed -- and a review of some big ones that didn't.

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Carbon Nanotube Computer Paves Way for Faster, Smaller Tech

KQED Science | September 26, 2013 | 1 Comment

Carbon Nanotube Computer Paves Way for Faster, Smaller Tech

The quest for ever-smaller and faster computers has taken a significant step forward. Engineers at Stanford have developed a process to build computers that use carbon nanotubes instead of silicon.

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California Lake’s Toxic Algae Among Worst in U.S.

KQED Science | September 24, 2013 | 3 Comments

California Lake’s Toxic Algae Among Worst in U.S.

A lake near Santa Cruz has the highest levels of toxic algae in the state, and some of the highest in the country, according to a new study. The report highlights Pinto Lake, which is in a park just outside of Watsonville.

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Birders Flock to See Blue-Footed Boobies

KQED Science | September 19, 2013 | 2 Comments

Birders Flock to See Blue-Footed Boobies

Blue-footed boobies are most commonly seen down in the Gulf of California or the Galapagos, but this week they’ve been flooding the Southern California coast, and making their way up north, where very few have come before.

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