Donate

Danna Staaf

Danna is a marine biologist, a science writer, a novelist, an artist, and an educator. She helped found the outreach program Squids4Kids, illustrated The Game of Science,
and has blogged at Squid A Day
since 2009. She holds a BA in Creative Studies from the University of California, Santa Barbara, and a PhD in Baby Squid from Stanford. She lives in San Jose with her husband, daughter, and cats.

rss feed Author's Website

Danna Staaf's Latest Posts

World’s Largest “Tentacles” Exhibit at Monterey Bay Aquarium Will Cultivate Its Own Cephalopods

KQED Science | April 8, 2014 | 2 Comments

World’s Largest “Tentacles” Exhibit at Monterey Bay Aquarium Will Cultivate Its Own Cephalopods

The Monterey Bay Aquarium's new exhibit will be the world’s largest, most diverse display of octopuses, squid and cuttlefish. To pull it off, aquarists are coaxing reproduction from the most reluctant critters.

Continue Reading

Can Cultivating Compassion Lead to Happiness?

KQED Science | March 4, 2014 | 0 Comments

Can Cultivating Compassion Lead to Happiness?

Compassion makes us happy, but the internet makes us jerks. Is there a way to cultivate kindness in the digital age?

Continue Reading

Using Art to Imagine a Restored Bay Delta Watershed

KQED Science | February 3, 2014 | 1 Comment

Using Art to Imagine a Restored Bay Delta Watershed

The San Francisco Bay Delta watershed is enormous. It has also been enormously altered. Volunteer, non-profit and government efforts have all done a great deal to restore the watershed. But according to Derek Hitchcock, an ecologist with The Watershed Project, “Cultural healing is needed before watershed healing.”

Continue Reading

Stunning Fish Skeletons Serve Science and Art

KQED Science | January 7, 2014 | 0 Comments

Stunning Fish Skeletons Serve Science and Art

Cleared and stained skeletons are strikingly beautiful. But not many people outside the lab would ever know it—until now. "Cleared" is an exhibit of stained fish skeletons currently on display at the Seattle Aquarium, prepared and photographed by Adam P. Summers. Recently, Summers and his colleagues used a cleared and stained manta ray to discover how these curiously flat fish filter food out of the water.

Continue Reading

Here’s Some Sweet Research: Increased Chocolate Consumption Linked to Less Body Fat

KQED Science | December 3, 2013 | 0 Comments

Here’s Some Sweet Research: Increased Chocolate Consumption Linked to Less Body Fat

‘Tis the season to indulge—and perhaps make up for it at New Year’s with a resolution to exercise more. But what if all that chocolate doesn’t require penitence? A new paper has linked chocolate consumption to reduced “fatness” in European teens. This confirms and extends a recent study from UCSD that found a similar link in Californian adults.

Continue Reading

Creepy Cat Eyes Inspire Road Markers (And Other Unexpectedly Interesting Inventions)

KQED Science | November 12, 2013 | 0 Comments

Creepy Cat Eyes Inspire Road Markers (And Other Unexpectedly Interesting Inventions)

Nature's inventiveness often inspires human innovation, as in the well-known case of Velcro. Learn about other inventions featured in "Hidden Heroes: The Genius of Everyday Things," an exhibit currently on display at the San Jose Museum of Art.

Continue Reading

A Squid’s Switchable Cells Offer Key to Camouflage

KQED Science | October 1, 2013 | 0 Comments

A Squid’s Switchable Cells Offer Key to Camouflage

New research shows that market squid may have something to offer the engineering sector: skin cells that can switch between transparent and white. Humans could use these cells to develop new bio-inspired materials; squid probably use them for cross-dressing.

Continue Reading

Kids Explore the World Through Science Photography at San Jose’s Children’s Discovery Museum

KQED Science | September 3, 2013 | 0 Comments

Kids Explore the World Through Science Photography at San Jose’s Children’s Discovery Museum

The San Jose Children's Discovery Museum has a new program that introduces seventh, eighth and ninth graders to digital SLR cameras and the basic principles of photography. It's also a first-time science experience for many students.

Continue Reading