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Amy Standen

As a radio reporter for KQED Science, Amy's grappled with archaic maps, brain fitness exercises, albino redwood trees, and jet-lagged lab rats, as well as modeled a wide variety of hard hats and construction vests. Long before all that, she learned to cut actual tape interning for a Latin American news show at WBAI in New York, then took her first radio job as a producer for Pulse of the Planet. Since then, Amy has been an editor at Salon.com, the editor of Terrain Magazine, and has produced stories for NPR, Living on Earth, Philosophy Talk, and Pop Up Magazine. She's also a founding editor of Meatpaper Magazine.

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Amy Standen's Latest Posts

Historic San Jose Observatory Faces Closure

KQED Science | December 17, 2013 | 0 Comments

Historic San Jose Observatory Faces Closure

Lick Observatory, on top of Mount Hamilton, is in danger of being mothballed if University of California officials can't come up with new sources of revenue.

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Jupiter’s Moon Has Vast Geysers, Says NASA

KQED Science | December 12, 2013 | 0 Comments

Jupiter’s Moon Has Vast Geysers, Says NASA

If there’s life swimming around in Europa's ice-covered oceans, the geysers are most certainly spewing it into the atmosphere, where future NASA missions might be able to grab and study it.

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En Route to Jupiter, Juno Sends First-Ever Video of Earth and Moon

KQED Science | December 11, 2013 | 0 Comments

En Route to Jupiter, Juno Sends First-Ever Video of Earth and Moon

In San Francisco this week, NASA scientists presented rare video footage of the Earth and moon, plus a first for citizen space science.

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Meet ISON, the “Comet of the Century” That, Sadly, Wasn’t

KQED Science | November 29, 2013 | 0 Comments

Meet ISON, the “Comet of the Century” That, Sadly, Wasn’t

Comet ISON may not have survived its close brush with the Sun, but astronomers are still going to "study the heck out of it," says Foothill College astronomy professor Andrew Fraknoi.

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It’s Official: Toxic Flame Retardants No Longer Required in Furniture

KQED Science | November 21, 2013 | 20 Comments

It’s Official: Toxic Flame Retardants No Longer Required in Furniture

California overturns a nearly 40-year-old law that made your sofa potentially menacing.

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NASA Launches its New Mars Mission

KQED Science | November 18, 2013 | 0 Comments

NASA Launches its New Mars Mission

NASA's newest Mars probe, MAVEN is now shooting through the solar system. A mere 440 million miles stand between the robotic explorer and its final destination: the Martian atmosphere.

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Why Astronauts and Telecommunications Companies Fear the ‘Solar Maximum’

KQED Science | November 12, 2013 | 0 Comments

Why Astronauts and Telecommunications Companies Fear the ‘Solar Maximum’

Every 11 years, the magnetic field of the sun changes its polarity (in fact, this may already be happening) sending a ripple of changing current out way past Pluto, to the outer reaches of the heliosphere. This solar "flip" is happening now.

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Meditation May Ease PTSD in Combat Vets

KQED Science | November 8, 2013 | 0 Comments

Meditation May Ease PTSD in Combat Vets

The crisis of post-traumatic stress disorder -- both for newly returned vets and Vietnam vets who have lived with PTSD for decades -- is forcing the US military to explore some unorthodox treatments, including "compassion meditation."

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Meteor Crashed with the Force of 600,000 Tons of TNT, Say Scientists (And It’ll Happen Again)

KQED Science | November 6, 2013 | 0 Comments

Meteor Crashed with the Force of 600,000 Tons of TNT, Say Scientists (And It’ll Happen Again)

The Chelyabinsk meteor was a 65-foot hunk of space rock that entered the Earth's atmosphere at about 12 miles per second before exploding with a force equal to 600,000 tons of TNT, enough to level buildings and send 1,200 people to local hospitals.

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Kepler Team: Universe “Crowded” with Earth-Like Planets

KQED Science | November 4, 2013 | 0 Comments

Kepler Team: Universe “Crowded” with Earth-Like Planets

A NASA scientist sums it up: “If we ever get star travel, we’ll probably see a lot of traffic jams.”

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How to Fly a Model Helicopter With Your Brain and Other Adventures in EEG Gaming

KQED Science | October 25, 2013 | 0 Comments

How to Fly a Model Helicopter With Your Brain and Other Adventures in EEG Gaming

In recent years EEGs, devices that measure brain waves, have gotten easier to use and much less expensive. They used to be mainly for scientific and medical research, but now developers are coming up with ways to harness them for fun.

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Should Every Newborn Undergo Genetic Testing?

KQED Science | October 11, 2013 | 1 Comment

Should Every Newborn Undergo Genetic Testing?

The NIH has launched a five-year, $25 million dollar effort to explore what may be one of the great ethical dilemmas of the 21st century: Just because we can do genetic testing on infants, should we?

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What Does an Epileptic Seizure Sound Like?

KQED Science | October 1, 2013 | 0 Comments

What Does an Epileptic Seizure Sound Like?

A neurologist collaborates with a music professor to translate the electrical signals of hidden seizures into sound. The result: a "stethoscope for the brain."

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Flame Retardants Fade Faster From Our Bodies Than Expected

KQED Science | September 25, 2013 | 0 Comments

Flame Retardants Fade Faster From Our Bodies Than Expected

Researchers wanted to know: Now that they've been banned, how soon would a controversial class of flame retardants called PBDEs start disappearing from women's bodies? The answer: Sooner than they thought.

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Epilepsy Reveals the Brain in Action

KQED Science | September 20, 2013 | 3 Comments

Epilepsy Reveals the Brain in Action

It's common sense: If you want to study the brain, open it up and take a look. That's not an opportunity scientists often get. One rare exception: patients with severe epilepsy, who volunteer their time as research subjects in the course of their treatment.

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Humpback Whales Crowd Monterey Bay

KQED Science | September 13, 2013 | 1 Comment

Humpback Whales Crowd Monterey Bay

This weekend is a great time to go whale watching, especially if you live near Monterey Bay. Local tour guides say they're seeing surprisingly large of humpbacks offshore.

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New NASA Moon Mission Aims to Solve a 40-Year-Old Mystery

KQED Science | September 3, 2013 | 0 Comments

New NASA Moon Mission Aims to Solve a 40-Year-Old Mystery

In 1972, an Apollo 17 astronaut glimpsed a strange phenomenon of streaming light from the window of the command module as it orbited the dark side of the moon. Now, a new NASA mission aims to discover what caused that phenomenon, and whether it could be a hazard for future lunar landings.

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In the Experience of Doubt, a Possible Cure for Alcoholism

KQED Science | August 2, 2013 | 3 Comments

In the Experience of Doubt, a Possible Cure for Alcoholism

In some alcoholics, the act of overriding one's better judgment to have another drink can be traced to a specific network in the brain. The question is, can you make it do something else?

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Put Your Smart Phone to Work Doing Real Science

KQED Science | July 25, 2013 | 2 Comments

Put Your Smart Phone to Work Doing Real Science

Your cell phone can now help research climate change, hunt for pulsars, or design new AIDS drugs, thanks to a new crowd computing phone app from UC Berkeley.

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Air Travel: Why that Sardine Can of a Coach Section Could Save You

KQED Science | July 9, 2013 | 1 Comment

Air Travel: Why that Sardine Can of a Coach Section Could Save You

In the "bad roller coaster ride" of an aircraft mishap, that cramped coach seat might just save you.

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