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Amy Standen

Amy Standen is a radio reporter for KQED Science. Her email is astanden@kqed.org and you can follow her on Twitter at @amystanden.

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Amy Standen's Latest Posts

NASA Sends Fruit Flies to Space to Prep for Mars Missions

KQED Science | March 24, 2014 | 0 Comments

NASA Sends Fruit Flies to Space to Prep for Mars Missions

Getting sick in space is no picnic. So scientists are sending bugs to the International Space Station, hoping to better predict some of the physical challenges that may befall astronauts when NASA eventually sends the first human mission to Mars.

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California Takes Aim at Toxic Nap Mats, Paint Strippers

KQED Science | March 13, 2014 | 1 Comment

California Takes Aim at Toxic Nap Mats, Paint Strippers

Six years after voters passed the California Green Chemistry Initiative, the state lays out its plan to get toxic products off shelves.

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New UCSF Lab Studies How Video Games Affect Our Brains

KQED Science | March 6, 2014 | 0 Comments

New UCSF Lab Studies How Video Games Affect Our Brains

Video games do one thing very well: train people to become better gamers. But whether those results transfer outside the game into the real world is a source of lively debate among neuroscientists.

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Is Brain Stimulation a Medicine of the Future?

KQED Science | March 3, 2014 | 0 Comments

Is Brain Stimulation a Medicine of the Future?

While scientists study whether "electroceuticals" might treat depression or chronic pain, among other ailments, DIY "brain hackers" (including this reporter) are trying it out on themselves.

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NASA’s LADEE Spacecraft Sends Back New Moon Images

KQED Science | February 13, 2014 | 0 Comments

NASA’s LADEE Spacecraft Sends Back New Moon Images

The NASA spacecraft is designed to answer a 42-year-old mystery about lunar dust, but it's also snapping photos along the way.

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Leaky Natural Gas Pipes Are a Bigger Problem Than Previously Thought

KQED Science | February 13, 2014 | 0 Comments

Leaky Natural Gas Pipes Are a Bigger Problem Than Previously Thought

U.S. could make substantial reductions in greenhouse gas emissions by stopping methane leaks from natural gas pipelines, says a new Stanford study.

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Should Wine Bottles Carry a Deposit?

KQED Science | February 3, 2014 | 16 Comments

Should Wine Bottles Carry a Deposit?

Some are calling for bottle deposits on wine and liquor bottles to solve the deficit in the state’s recycling fund, but the industry says its recycling rates are already high.

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As Toxics Regulations Increase, Companies Simply Switch Chemicals

KQED Science | January 16, 2014 | 0 Comments

As Toxics Regulations Increase, Companies Simply Switch Chemicals

A UCSF researcher explains how public pressure on makeup manufacturers seems to work, and why it's "common sense" to keep plastic dishware out of the microwave.

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Silicon Valley Billionaire Battles Surfers Over Beach Access

KQED Science | January 13, 2014 | 134 Comments

Silicon Valley Billionaire Battles Surfers Over Beach Access

A small beach in Half Moon Bay has become ground zero for a drawn-out legal battle between locals and one Silicon Valley billionaire who would like to keep the public out.

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Our Ten Favorite Science Sounds of 2013

KQED Science | December 27, 2013 | 0 Comments

Our Ten Favorite Science Sounds of 2013

From whales and elephant seals to brain music and killer electrons, our best sounds of the year.

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SF Clothing Company Accused of Knowingly Selling Lead-Laden Products

KQED Science | December 24, 2013 | 1 Comment

SF Clothing Company Accused of Knowingly Selling Lead-Laden Products

Three youth-focused clothing chains, including San Francisco-based retailer Charlotte Russe, sell products with illegal levels of lead, according to an Oakland-based nonprofit group.

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Historic San Jose Observatory Faces Closure

KQED Science | December 17, 2013 | 0 Comments

Historic San Jose Observatory Faces Closure

Lick Observatory, on top of Mount Hamilton, is in danger of being mothballed if University of California officials can't come up with new sources of revenue.

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Jupiter’s Moon Has Vast Geysers, Says NASA

KQED Science | December 12, 2013 | 0 Comments

Jupiter’s Moon Has Vast Geysers, Says NASA

If there’s life swimming around in Europa's ice-covered oceans, the geysers are most certainly spewing it into the atmosphere, where future NASA missions might be able to grab and study it.

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En Route to Jupiter, Juno Sends First-Ever Video of Earth and Moon

KQED Science | December 11, 2013 | 0 Comments

En Route to Jupiter, Juno Sends First-Ever Video of Earth and Moon

In San Francisco this week, NASA scientists presented rare video footage of the Earth and moon, plus a first for citizen space science.

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Meet ISON, the “Comet of the Century” That, Sadly, Wasn’t

KQED Science | November 29, 2013 | 0 Comments

Meet ISON, the “Comet of the Century” That, Sadly, Wasn’t

Comet ISON may not have survived its close brush with the Sun, but astronomers are still going to "study the heck out of it," says Foothill College astronomy professor Andrew Fraknoi.

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It’s Official: Toxic Flame Retardants No Longer Required in Furniture

KQED Science | November 21, 2013 | 27 Comments

It’s Official: Toxic Flame Retardants No Longer Required in Furniture

California overturns a nearly 40-year-old law that made your sofa potentially menacing.

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NASA Launches its New Mars Mission

KQED Science | November 18, 2013 | 0 Comments

NASA Launches its New Mars Mission

NASA's newest Mars probe, MAVEN is now shooting through the solar system. A mere 440 million miles stand between the robotic explorer and its final destination: the Martian atmosphere.

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Why Astronauts and Telecommunications Companies Fear the ‘Solar Maximum’

KQED Science | November 12, 2013 | 0 Comments

Why Astronauts and Telecommunications Companies Fear the ‘Solar Maximum’

Every 11 years, the magnetic field of the sun changes its polarity (in fact, this may already be happening) sending a ripple of changing current out way past Pluto, to the outer reaches of the heliosphere. This solar "flip" is happening now.

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Meditation May Ease PTSD in Combat Vets

KQED Science | November 8, 2013 | 0 Comments

Meditation May Ease PTSD in Combat Vets

The crisis of post-traumatic stress disorder -- both for newly returned vets and Vietnam vets who have lived with PTSD for decades -- is forcing the US military to explore some unorthodox treatments, including "compassion meditation."

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Meteor Crashed with the Force of 600,000 Tons of TNT, Say Scientists (And It’ll Happen Again)

KQED Science | November 6, 2013 | 0 Comments

Meteor Crashed with the Force of 600,000 Tons of TNT, Say Scientists (And It’ll Happen Again)

The Chelyabinsk meteor was a 65-foot hunk of space rock that entered the Earth's atmosphere at about 12 miles per second before exploding with a force equal to 600,000 tons of TNT, enough to level buildings and send 1,200 people to local hospitals.

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